Some small Oxford Diecast Releases February 2018

By Maz Woolley

All photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

Oxford Diecast‘s outstanding models from their last Release are now being sold. There must have been a rush to get them finished and onto a ship before the Chinese New Year holiday began which is when most workers living away from their home areas go on an extended holiday to visit their family.

Their 1:76 scale models are extremely popular sellers here in the UK. 1:76 scale used to be heavily tied to railway modelling circles but Oxford’s models have spread its popularity over a much wider collecting base here in the UK over the last few years. This post has a look at two of the latest releases: one a new casting, and the other the sixth release of a casting that has been around for some time.

76RRC001 Rolls-Royce Corniche

The first release in 1:76 scale of this vehicle. The same car UTU353 has already been seen in 1:43 from Oxford with its hood down and reviewed on this site, click here to see it. A 1:76 scale model with the hood down painted persian sand is due later in the year to complement this one. Editors correction: Reader Andrew Davies quite rightly points out that all the 1:76 scale Corniche models will be hood-up so the Persian Sand model will be Hood up again.

The 1:43 model was excellent and Oxford has made an excellent job of making this model in the smaller scale.  The imitation fabric roof has been nicely painted on and the lines of the framework well modelled.

At the front the radiator, lights and bumper assembly are all excellent. Even the RR logo is printed on the radiator. The Spirit of Ecstacy is a little oversize but that is necessary or it would be too frail.

From the side the very thinly cast pillars become obvious. These are wonderful and allow the printed on chromework round the windows to look accurate. This shows what Oxford can do which makes the very thick pillars on some of their other models, and their printed window surrounds which are a scale 3 or 4 inches proud of the windows, even more frustrating.

At the rear of the car the lights are nicely painted on and number plates, reversing lights, and badging are all neatly printed.

The wheels are a little over-simplified but do not let the model down.

On the debit side the hood (roof) painting could be more neatly masked in places and I did have to scratch off a little overspray of “chrome” above windows printed on roof. But these are very minor points. This is an excellent model.

76FB006 Vauxhall FB Victor

The sixth appearance of this casting, and to my eyes one of the best. The single tone paint and printing are beautifully applied.

Most of the previous FBs have been two-tone cars with the exception of a single tone red one. To my eyes the single tone cactus green used here really suits the casting and the period.

This is another model where Oxford has got nice thin pillars around the windows and where the printed chromework works well. From the rear the lights are neatly painted on and the “Deluxe” badge is printed very well.

At the front this casting captures the somewhat plain grille and lights accurately. The Vauxhall lettering on the bonnet and the Victor lettering on the wing are excellent too. The wipers are printed slightly too thick but it is not too obvious.

The number plates initially caused me to go online and ask why Oxford Diecast was using reflective plates as they were not fitted until 1968 by which time the FB has been out of production for four years.

Many people pointed out that lots of people fitted reflective plates when they were introduced on cars made in previous years to make them look more up to date. So before I wrote an indignant letter to Oxford saying the plates were incorrect I looked on the web and there was ABC958B fitted with reflective plates. So the Oxford model is true to how the car is today, and probably has been for some time, rather than to when it was first sold.

So to summon up another lovely model. And with new castings like the Heinkel Kabine and the Isetta to look forward to in the next release any sixties street scene will be easy to populate with models from Oxford.

And one final photograph shows how well the Oxford models, and particularly the FB Victor, fit into a diorama of period buildings.

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