Oxford Diecast Rolls-Royce 25/30

By Maz Woolley

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

The model featured in this article is a recent release from Oxford Diecast. This is diecast to 1:43 scale in China for the UK. This is the second release using this casting. And continues the steadily release of Rolls-Royce licensed models from Oxford Diecast.

43R25002 Rolls-Royce 25/30 Thrupp and Maberly.

Just over one thousand and two hundred 25/30s were built between 1936 and 1938. It was an updated version of the 20/25 with a larger six cylinder engine of 4.2 Litres better able to carry the larger coach built bodies sometimes fitted. Other coachbuilders who built cars on this chassis were: Park Ward, H. J. Mulliner, Arthur Mulliner and Hooper. 

Thrupp and Maberly were a well respected coach builder based in Cricklewood in North London.  They even built the bodywork for Sir Henry Segrave‘s land speed record car, the Golden Arrow. They were acquired by the Rootes Brothers and started building top of the range Humber bodies from the early 1930s alongside bespoke bodies for Rolls-Royce, Bentley and Daimler chassis. As coach building declined after the Second World War they concentrated on the special bodied and open cars for the Rootes Group finally closing in 1967.

The car modelled by Oxford may be seen on the web and has chassis number GMP-37 and is registered BUE995, a Dudley plate, as printed on the plates on the Oxford model. The body style is stated to be that of an ‘owner driver sports saloon’. It is finished in a very deep green over black with an interior of black leather  and woodwork. Oxford have captured this well with the green looking considerably darker than the photographs show. A sunroof is fitted and Oxford have replicated that in a closed position.

The side view of the car shows how well the shape of the car has been caught by Oxford. The wheels are neatly done and initially I thought missed RR on the hub centres but looking at pictures of the real car I do not think they feature on that either.

Again the front three quarter view shows how good the model is capturing the curves which make the body a long way from a simple box shape. The real car has two auxiliary lights and not just one. The car released first, 43R25002, was based on BSG527 and that does have a single auxiliary light.  The rear view mirrors on BUE995 do not rise up anywhere near as much as they do on this model which can again be attributed to the fact they are based on those fitted to BSG527.

The rear three quarter view is excellent with the sculptural shape of the body work well captured.  The chrome mouldings round the ventilator in front door window, front screen, bonnet and sides are all printed crisply and finely. The trafficators are neatly highlighted in silver in the B pillars and the door locks printed on a raised part of the casting.

The interior is well done with dull black plastic leather finish, the wood trim well captured, and winder and door handles all picked out in silver on the door cards which are correctly painted black. The dashboard has been well modelled and appears to have some printed detail, though without taking the model apart it cannot be clearly seen.  The steering wheel is neatly moulded and has the large centre section for the advance/retard levers and horn.

The traditional grille has been moulded very well and there is a fine ‘Spirit of Ecstacy’ mascot on top. The RR initials are printed on the radiator shell but can only be seen when magnified. The lights are good with clear lenses but lack the three fine lines which should be seen on the face of the headlight glass.

To the rear another minor variation from the original car can be seen. The rear lights set on the rear wings are different to the ones fitted to BUE995 which are circular shapes on a chrome fitting which runs above and below the light. Here the lights are those fitted on BSG527 and many other 25/30s which are rectangular and jut out of the wing at the top of the housing.  Lights round the rear number plate are printed well with the multiple lens sections created by the printing. Even the small reflectors under the  rear bumper are captured.

The exhaust is fitted with a  fan shaped end but again this is not fitted to the car that the model is based on which has a simple pipe to the rear. Perhaps this is another feature carried forward from the first release of the casting.

Whilst the model has many small faults if you are looking for an exact replica of the original car on which it is based it is a great model overall. When judging it I also have to remember that this is a mass market, budget priced model, and not an expensive resin item. I think that Oxford Diecast show what they can do with their Rolls-Royce models which show a lot of detailed care and attention in design and manufacturing, something sadly lacking elsewhere in their ranges from time to time. There are compromises made but overall I think that they are making some of the nicest Rolls -Royce models available today with the great benefit that you will not get them out of store to find chrome parts peeling and dropping off as happens on many resin models.


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