Making a Jaguar XF Sportbreak

By John F. Quilter

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

Picture copyright of Car Magazine

A few years ago Jaguar launched the estate version of the midsize XF saloon which was introduced around 2010. One of my model vendors had Whitebox 1:43 scale models of the XFR at a bargain price and combined with that, and the fact I did not have a model of the Sportbreak, Jaguar’s name for their estate, I decided to make one myself. Currently no model maker does a Sportbreak so my Jaguar collection was lacking.

The process, which replicates to some extent things I have done before, entailed first, a complete disassembly and strip down of the red Whitebox XFR. Off came the base plate, interior, lights and in this case even the door handles which are not cast into the model. Then out came the jeweler’s saw to cut off the rear quarter of the top and the boot lid area.

I was in luck on this model as Jaguar’s massive sales brochure had outstanding photos of both the saloon and the estate as 90 degree side shots, 90 degree front and rear shots. These, and photos found on Google are invaluable in getting the shape and details correct. The rear portion of the diecast roof which was not cut off was gently bent upwards to replicate the angle of the estate roof. Then using sheet aluminum an extension of the roof was created and new side window frames from the B pillar back were cut out and shaped.

Since the Sportbreak has a large glass roof I filled in the existing smaller sunroof opening. To create the glass roof effect I simply painted this in gloss black as these roof panels are heavily tinted for sun protection.

A spoiler, (or is it a rear mounted sun visor?) was made from a section of aluminum sheet. I noted that the Sportbreak is from the “facelift” XF so that meant that some details had to be changed, minor shape differences to the tail lamps, relocation of the exhaust pipes, the shape of the front valance side vents and the vent below the central grill. The vents on the bonnet had to be eliminated and the front wing vents reshaped. Side window glazing was some clear plastic from a food container and since this was flat, presented no special issues. The rounded rear tailgate window was also a piece of repurposed food container with a suitable curvature.

My spare parts inventory contained a black rear window wiper that fit well. Photos from the sales brochure showed an interior and seats in two tone black and grey so the stock Whitebox all black interior was enhanced with some grey panels to the seats.

Final paint was with a “rattle can” of Krylon white, finished a few days later with a clear coat of Testors Model Master clear gloss enamel. This is a new technique to me and it does give a superior finish almost to the extent of a factory built model. One must remember that the gloss enamel takes a number of days to fully dry so one must resist the temptation to start handling the model for a number of days after painting.

So this Sportbreak represents the second production Jaguar estate, the first being the X Type which was done in 1:43 scale by Premium X. It appears that now many of the current Jaguar and Land Rover models are being done by TSM, (True Scale Models) who I’m told are a client of Premium Collectibles Trading (Editor: the group which produces Ixo and Premium X brands as well as making models under contract for many others like DeAgostini and White Box). In 1:43 scale they currently make the two crossover Jaguars the F Pace, and E Pace, as well as the electric I Pace. Time will tell if they launch a Sportbreak making my effort redundant.