K&R Triumph GT6 Mark 3

By Maz Woolley

 

K&R models have been in business since 1977 making them one of the pioneers of the White Metal model industry.  The firm is now run by Stephen Roff who took over when his father Keith semi-retired. Their models are sold mail order, via their website  http://www.kandrreplicas.co.uk/ and at their eBay shop. Most of the models they offer have been available for some years, but they do add new models from time to to time.

At the time that the Author bought this kit some years ago there were no Triumph GT6s available on the market other than the K&R.  Prior to that Vitesse of Portugal made a Mark III and since that time Spark produced a nice resin model. It is a mystery why so many toys and models were made of the Triumph Spitfire and how few of the Spitfire derived GT6. K&R currently only offer the GT6 in  Mark One and Two versions but the Mark Three may well become available again in the future.

The GT6 used the Triumph straight six engine and gearbox in the 2 Litre configuration  used in the Triumph Vitesse. Its main competitor was the 1800cc MGB GT which was similar but had a rear bench useful for small children or luggage as standard. The GT6 came as a two seater as standard but could have a small rear bench added as an option. The GT6 was only ever produced in relatively small numbers with only around 13,000 of the Mark Threes being manufactured. By the time that the Mark Three was launched the GT6 was considerably faster than the MGB, 112MPH versus 105MPH and could go from 0-60MPH in 10.1 seconds rather than 13.0. The car was dropped from the Triumph line up in 1973 by which time British Leyland needed to start to rationalise its output. It kept the better selling selling MGB which soldiered on to 1980.

The K&R model is typical of their earlier output. With a body shell supplemented by a Vacform for the windows, a base plate and a number of individual components to make up the interior,exhaust and wheels. It is an earlier model so has fewer tiny parts than thee more recent kits. The door handles and rear lights are moulded in rather than being supplied as separate items for example.

 

The pretty rear end based on the Mark IV Spitfire
Shape captured albeit a little heavily
Neatly modelled front end with the higher bumper to meet US legislation

The model is perhaps a little “heavy” but does capture the GT6 style very well right down to the high level front bumpers which did not mar this car in any way or lead to the horrible handling imposed on the MG by raising the car to meet US legislation.

The wheels capture the special wheels used on this model well, in fact wire wheels were not even an option by the end of this cars production run.

The vacform is thin and not particularly tight fitting in the window area and the front lights are just rounded discs. In this case they have been replaced by clear domed lights formed from  Krystal Klear. Care is also needed to try to get the tyres to sit correctly on the wheel rims.

The colour chosen by the Author may not be authentic but it shows off the GT6s lines better than a solid colour would.

Not a perfect model by any means but fun to build and relatively inexpensive.


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