Jello and Chips- Part Two

By Robin Godwin

Except where otherwise acknowledged all pictures are by the Author.

In January 2018, I wrote an article on General Foods CanadaFamous Car Picture Wheels” and mentioned that there was a second series of coins produced perhaps a year or two later – “Famous Aircraft of the World.” This series must have been produced in 1962 or 1963, as the last entries in the series are the De Havilland Trident and John Glenn’s Friendship 7 Mercury Capsule, both from 1962 (Glenn was the first US Astronaut to orbit the earth in Feb 1962).

The main difference with the aircraft series is that they are organized by role rather than era. The photos clearly show the roles represented, with role exceptions being the first 25 coins, called “Pioneers” which includes a bit of Greek mythology, and the final 25, called “Others” which includes missiles, gyroplanes and hovercraft. There are only a few helicopters that appear in the “Transports” section, but I’m surprised they didn’t warrant their own section.

The booklet was compiled and written by James A. Hornick, a noted Canadian Aviation journalist at the time. Illustrations were done by Don Watt.

The back of the Aircraft coins includes the Hostess (Chips) brand name, which was missing from the Car wheels (see photo in my earlier article).

Image from the Web

So this is another great little bit of nostalgic collectability from the 60s. If you are interested in seeing more coins you can “Google” “famous aircraft of the world jello coins” and look for the Google images.

The full carousel of 200 airplane coins, colour coded by role/theme. Note “partially cloudy” blue sky colour

Detailed 76 page booklet with descriptions and specifications for each coin. There is also a section at the back explaining aerodynamics, with some expanded detail on aircraft structures and engines. Booklet and carousel were mail-order items from General Foods

Initial coin for each role as identified at top of coin

Who would have known back in 1962 or 1963 when the author was 12 that he would serve in the Canadian Air Force for his whole career, and among others, fly each type shown here. The Link Trainer was in use when I went through pilot selection in Toronto in 1973. I’d like to say that these coins provided inspiration for my later career, but they had been in storage and forgotten in my parents attic for years when I joined the Air Force.

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