Category Archives: Saviem

Hachette Italy World Buses Part 27

By Fabrizio Panico

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

Parts 79 and 80

Here is the 27th and last part of my summary of the Italian Hachette partwork “Autobus dal mondo”, a collection of eighty 1:43 scale bus models, very similar to the French one “Autobus et autocars du monde”, produced in Bangladesh for Ixo. Here we’ll see two more French buses, a Berliet and a Chausson, but on the other hand we must remember that it is basically a collection of French origins. As an add-on we’ll also see a Fiat 418 Cameri, a model Italian Hachette offered only to the subscribers to the whole Italian collection, but which was available as a standard issue in the French collection.


No. 79 (no. 102 in the French collection) Berliet PCS 10 RATP 1960 – We have already seen the Berliet Crusair 3 (see part 8, no. 22), the PHL 10 (see part 10, no. 30), the PR100 range (Jelcz version, see part 14, no. 40), the PLR 10 (see part sixteen, no. 47), the original 1969 Crusair (see part twenty-one, no. 62) and the 1956 PLR 8 MU (see part twenty-three, no. 69). Berliet is one of the oldest automobile manufacturer, part of Citroën from 1967, then acquired by Renault in 1974 and merged with Saviem into the new RVI in 1978. Berliet produced many different vehicles, but after the Second World War only commercial vehicle production was resumed, and Berliet had to face strong competition from Chausson and Renault. Indeed Berliet had no experience outside the field of heavy commercial vehicles, and choose then to buy Rochet-Schneider for its capacity and it’s ‘know-how’. In 1951 it launched the PLR 8, a very powerful bus, but already dated. It was only in 1955 with the PCP 10 that Berliet was able to enter the profitable Parisian transport fleet, until then dominated by Renault. After the Second World War the RATP (Régie Autonome des Transports Parisiens) had expanded its suppliers list, and from 1950 started to use the Somua OP5 (see part seven, no. 20), an innovative bus with an almost all-steel closed body by Million-Guiet-Tubauto (MGT), which was more comfortable for driver and passengers. A very reliable bus, the OP5 modernised the Parisian fleet, slowly replacing the old open platform buses, which had been a real Parisian trademark. In 1955 the RATP choose to try the Berliet PCP10, using the same body of the OP5-3 by MGT (only the front grille was different), and ordered 100 buses, with a diesel Berliet six-in-line engine developing 145 CV placed longitudinally in the front of the chassis, and fitted with a Wilson pre-selector gearbox. In 1960 a further 50 buses were supplied by Berliet, named PCS10 and using a Somua chassis, easily identified by a more prominent front grille, a reduced front overhang and some minor details. More liked than the Somua, the Berliets were phased out in 1972.

The scale model sports the classic dark green and cream livery of the RATP. It is quite a large model with a plastic body, a metal chassis and the usual plastic added parts. Underside details are present, the exhaust is silver painted and there is a rear tow hitch. On both sides there are “Conord” ads, while in the rear there is a “Chantelle” one, all very agreeable.

The destination plate reads “#73 – Puteaux – Louis Blanc”, the route starting at the Paris Hotel de Ville and ending at Puteaux, a commune in the western suburbs of Paris, located in the heart of the Hauts-de-Seine department. It is host to La Défense, Paris’ business district with the tallest buildings in the metropolitan area. There isn’t a standard registration plate, because until March 2003 RATP buses used special registration plates with their own serial number. The interior is fairly detailed and it is fitted with nice four-leaf doors and large windows. No apparent differences to the French edition exist. Indeed another beautiful model, very likely a smart re-use of a previous mould (no. 20, Somua OP5).


No. 80 (no. 103 in the French collection) Saviem E7 1970 – We have already seen the 1965 Saviem SC10 U (see part thirteen, no. 39) and the 1960 SC1 (see part twenty-four, no. 71), and how at the end of 1955 Renault, facing strong competition from Berliet and lacking factory capacity decided to unify its forces with Somua and Latil creating LRS Saviem (Latil-Renault-Somua Société Anonyme de Véhicules Industriels et d’Equipments Mécaniques), later incorporating Isobloc and Chausson. But during the 1960s the competition was changing, and the ‘battlefield’ was now the whole of Europe. The innovative products from Setra and Van Hool were international successes and both Berliet and Saviem soon realised the urgent need for a rear engined vehicle, with sufficient power, large luggage spaces beneath the floor, large windows and, very important, a higher level of passenger comfort. Berliet’s prompt answer was the Crusair range (see part eight, no. 22, and part twenty-one, no. 62), but Saviem was seriously disadvantaged : it was lacking the ‘know-how’ (Isoblocs were its last rear engined buses), had to build a new assembly line and was forced to launch the new bus if possible at the same time as Berliet. The result was the E7, presented in May 1969, a bus with a modern angular shape, a modular body for different versions, large windows and symmetrical front and rear sides, excellent comfort, a powerful longitudinal rear engine by MAN, but …. the vehicle suffered from the hasty development. Problems quickly appeared in service: with the electrical system, the heating system, and even the body structure itself. Disappointed users’ complaints soon became public and, despite making changes to resolve the problems, market confidence evaporated. Less than 3,500 units were produced, with many exported to Africa.

The quite large scale model shows faithfully the E7L‘s angular shape. As usual there is a plastic body and metal chassis, and it is finished in a cream and gold livery. The interior is basic though there is a nicely detailed driver’s cockpit. There are very detailed side windows and roof lights. Many separate small plastic parts are used, and excellent decoration, even the small details between the side windows are captured.

However, the Saviem logo is difficult to read (silver print on gold paint). It is a replica of a bus of the Société des Transports Allauzen, based in Joyeuse, a commune in the Ardèche department in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region in southern France. Voyages Sotra are now part of Voyages Ginhoux, a family business founded in 1830 to transport goods and passengers in the Ardèche region. It is fitted with a correct “07” registration plate. There are no apparent differences to the French edition. It is a worthy reproduction of an “unlucky” bus.


Unnumbered (no. 53 in the French collection) Fiat 418 AC Cameri 1972 – As already stated in part five, Italian Hachette offered its subscribers a model of a Fiat 418, a 1972 Cameri from the AMT of Genova, (no. 53 in the French collection). I did not qualify to receive one as I prefer to buy collections at a news stand in order to avoid delays, or problem with the mail. Luckily it was quite easy to find the 418 Cameri on eBay to complete the collection.

We have already met the Fiat products and in particular the 418 (see part five, no. 13), a typical urban bus adopted in all the large cities of Italy to replace the ageing 409 and 410. It was of the same general design, a separate chassis fitted with a longitudinal engine placed centrally under the floor. The usual body was by Cameri, already absorbed into Fiat Group in 1936 and operating under the CANSA name (see part 10, no. 28), but the chassis was also made available to outside specialised bodywork manufacturers like Portesi, Pistoiesi, Breda, Dalla Via, Padane and Menarini. The 418 was equipped with the Fiat 8200.12 diesel engine, a flat straight six, of 9,819CC developing 143 kw of power. Some versions had an automatic gearbox, but a manual gearbox was also available.

The scale model, based on a preserved vehicle, has a plastic body and a metal baseplate with little detail. It is finished in an orange and grey livery, typical of Genoa (Genova) in the North of Italy, one of the most important ports on the Mediterranean. The shape is well reproduced, with nice details, but inside the seats are poorly coloured (it could be specific to this example). It has very nice front and rear ends, and the rear lights are excellent.

The destination plate reads “Brignole – San Nicolò”, where Brignole is the main railway station and San Nicolò is a village belonging to the municipality of Genova, on its west side. A correct registration plate is featured. A good choice, a bus warmly remembered.

Conclusions

The collection has now ended and it is time to draw some conclusions. The choice of subjects was quite interesting and rightly included all the Italian buses from the French collection and a selection of all the others. Though it must be said that after the decision to extend the partwork from sixty to eighty models, it then copied the French one, offering the same models issued in France a couple of weeks later. It is very likely that Italian collectors might have preferred some of the previous models from the larger French collection whichdid not appeared in the first 60 of the Italian collection, like the Hispano Suiza or the Floirat.

It is possible to see the whole French collection on the web on a very interesting site. All the models have been of really high quality and have been excellent value for money. Packaging was quite basic, but was effective at avoiding any damage, but due to the wildly different sizes and shapes no clear plastic box was provided. If the collection had one problem it is the sheer size of the collection’s models. You need a very large space to display or even just to store them! A problem well known to a lot of collectors. Happy collecting!


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Hachette Italy World Buses – Part 24

By Fabrizio Panico

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

Here we are at part 24 of this series covering the releases from ‘Autobus dal mondo’. Something of  record to reach two years of issues of models and history.  And there are still more to go!

Parts number 70 to 72

At last a Swedish bus and two more French buses: a gas-fed war-time Renault and a Saviem used in Morocco (former French protectorate). They are from the Italian Hachette partwork ‘Autobus dal mondo’”, a collection of eighty 1:43 scale bus models, very similar to the French series ‘Autobus et autocars du monde’”, produced in Bangladesh for Ixo.


No. 70 (no. 93 in the French collection) Renault TN4 F (Gaz de ville) 1940 – This is the fifth Renault in the collection. Aside from those produced after mergers in the French bus and coach industry which combined Latil, Renault and Somua, into Saviem in 1955 . Later Isobloc and Chausson. were also absorbed. After the AGP Saharien (see part seven, no. 19), the TN6-C2 (see part twelve, no. 34), the R4192 (see part nineteen, no. 55 and part twenty one, no. 61) it is now the turn of another TN, a TN4 F modified to run on city gas, due to the scarcity of fuels during the Second World War. The STCRP (Société des Transport en Commun de la Région Parisienne) had already tested the use of a gasifier (tried on over 300 buses) and a mixture of alcohols (with poor results), and in 1940 decided to use uncompressed city gas (a mixture of methane and hydrogen). This choice needed each vehicle to have a very large storage tank (about 17-20 cubic metres) and it gave a very limited range on one fill (about 20 kilometres, just a round trip).

A container in rubberised canvas (from the stocks of balloons manufactured by Goodrich, in the outskirts of Paris) was placed on the roof, protected by a large fairing made of wood fibre panels. Over 500 buses were converted, TN4 F/H and TN6 only, but fuel wasn’t the sole problem; the scarcity of oil, tires and spare parts soon left many buses out of service and in June 1944 only 275 bus were still operative. Besides, the population preferred to move by the underground, the bus fleet being heavily affected by requisitions and evacuations. The result was a reorganisation of the Parisian transport system, with the STCRP and the Compagnie du chemin de fer Métropolitain de Paris (CMP) merging from 1942 to officially become the RATP (Régie Autonome des Transports Parisiens) in 1949. It is interesting to note that despite the exceptional height (4.10 metres) and the extreme flammability of the gas there were never any major incidents.

The original bus, the first TN4 (a bus with a length of 9.5 metres, more powerful engine and with a larger capacity of up to 50 passengers) was introduced in 1931 at the request of the STCRP. It was the first Renault bus with the radiator in front of the engine instead of behind as used on previous ones. The first TNs had an open platform and an inline four cylinder engine of 58 CV, while in 1932 the TN6 received an inline six cylinder engine of 68 CV. After the war, all the TNs in service were refurbished, even adopting a more enclosed cabin to protect the driver. They were then slowly phased out, the last in 1971.

The scale model is a faithful reproduction of thevehicle from the large “AMTUIR” collection (Association du Musée des Transports Urbains, Interurbains et Ruraux), its museum is now located in Chelles, Seine-et-Marne, part of the Parisian agglomeration (see www.amtuir.org). But TN4F No. 3158 is a replica. A false raised roof was placed on the vehicle and the vehicle is currently running on petrol (all roof fairings were eliminated during general revisions, completed in 1948).

As usual there is a plastic multi-part body with a metal chassis. Classic green and cream livery is well reproduced, and is lacking any advert. Like the chassis (where a printed name replaces the original one) and the interiors, the central part of the body is common with the previous TN6-C2 (no. 34), whilst the driver’s cab is now an open one. Many separate small items are fitted. Note the blacked-out headlight. It is a shame that there is a shiny metal support inside the rear platform. There are no apparent differences to the French release. A fair witness of past war times.


No. 71 (no. 94 in the French collection) Saviem SC1 1960 – We have already met the Saviem SC10 U (see part thirteen, no. 39), and how at the end of 1955 Renault, faced with strong competition from Berliet, and lacking factory capacity, decided to merge with Somua and Latil creating LRS Saviem, later incorporating Isobloc and Chausson. In 1949 Renault presented the R4000 series, the first “modern” Renault bus (previously they were based on a truck chassis, heavy and uncomfortable) with a unitary structure. The engine was now placed horizontally on the right hand side between the two axles, and the body had a rounded shape with a chromed grille. It was an instant success and was produced in many different versions (the R 4192 was a low roof version with a more powerful diesel engine). Following the mergers in 1955 it gained a Saviem logo, in 1957 it was restyied and renamed the Saviem ZR20. In 1960 a new engine was fitted and the SC1 name used. In 1964 the S45 name was used and it stayed in production up to 1993 with periodic updates.

Compared to the R4192 (see part nineteen, no. 55 and part twenty one, no. 61) the SC1 presented the same new front and rear “panoramic” screens already seen on the ZR20, a simplified front grille and improved wipers. But much more important were the new engine, the Fulgur diesel six with 150 CV (30 CV more than the previous one, which was aptly named “fainéant” or loafer), and the Grégoire suspension, the “aérostable”, a variable flexibility system, which gave a very comfortable ride.

The scale model is a faithful reproduction of an interesting vehicle, a bus exported to Morocco, which was up to 1955 a French protectorate. As usual there is a plastic body and a metal chassis, very likely partly recycled from the previous R4192. The name on the baseplate is now printed, but the front and rear of the body are entirely new. The white and blue livery shows the logo of CTM, the Compagnie de Transport au Maroc, the line Casablanca-Marrakech, is still active today. Since its creation in 1919, the history of CTM accompanied that of modern Morocco, contributing to its development. In 1969 CTM merged with Lignes Nationales and extended its services to the whole Morocco.

It was the first Moroccan company privatised in 1993, at the same time as it was introduced on the stock exchange of Casablanca. Very nice white-wall tires and driver’s cab feature. The usual luggage rack is fitted to the roof and a large ladder provided for access. Many separate parts are used and the headlights pods are particularly notable. The characteristic long bars are fitted along the roof which are used to fix the canvas to protect the baggage. No apparent differences to the French series. Nice to have something from another continent.


No. 72 (no. 95 in the French collection) Volvo B375 1957 – Nice to see a Swedish bus at last. Today the Volvo Group (Aktiebolaget Volvo, shortened to AB Volvo) is a Swedish multinational manufacturing company headquartered in Gothenburg, and its main activity is the production, distribution and sale of trucks, buses and construction equipment. Automobile manufacturer Volvo Cars was part of AB Volvo until 1999, when it was sold to the Ford Motor Company, and then re-sold in 2010 to the Chinese Geely Holding Group. The brand name Volvo means “I roll” in Latin, conjugated from “volvere”. Volvo was established in 1915 as a subsidiary of SKF, a ball bearing manufacturer however both Volvo Group and Volvo Cars regard their founding to be in 1927, when the first Volvo car left the assembly line. The first truck debuted in 1928, an immediate success soon exported in Europe, while the first bus, named B1, was launched in 1934. After a very complicated (and too tedious to report here) sequence of partnerships, purchases and sales, the Volvo Group is focused on heavy vehicles and its operations include among other things Volvo Trucks, Volvo Buses, Mack Trucks, and Renault Trucks.

The Volvo Brage/Starke/Raske was a series of medium size trucks produced between 1954 and 1972 : the L370 Brage was named after the Norse god Bragi and sported an overhead valve petrol engine, in parallel with the Brage Volvo offered a diesel version called L375 Starke (Strong), likewise with a payload of 4.5 tonnes, to be replaced in 1961 by the sturdier L475 Raske (Swift) with a payload of 5 tonnes. From the L375 (L as in Lastbil, Swedish for truck) Volvo derived the B375 (B as in Buss, for bus), with the same chassis and mechanics of the truck. The engine was a diesel six in-line, with 95 CV. Early trucks had a non-synchronised four-speed gearbox, soon replaced by a synchronised five-speed transmission by ZF. The body was usually built by local coachbuilders, in this case a Danish one, V. Frandsen Karosserifabrikk. This long distance bus had a very long body, far outweighing the rear overhang and could carry 31 passengers. The spare wheel was hung at the rear externally, freeing more space for luggage compartments. A bus not avant-garde, not specially original, and lacking modernity, but very suitable for difficult Scandinavian roads.

The scale model has the usual plastic body and metal chassis, with an added exhaust, in front of a rear wheel, it is not very well connected either. The red and white livery is well applied, but there is no indication of the transport company. The destination board reads “Ystad (Rønne)”. Ystad is a town in Skåne County, in the south of Sweden, dating back to the 11th century, nowadays more famous for being the primary set for the detective series “Wallander”. Rønne is the largest town on the Danish island of Bornholm in the Baltic Sea, just in front of Ystad and connected to it by ferry.

The registration plate seems to be Danish, the yellow one for buses and trucks. A very nice radiator grille is fitted with the Volvo logo on show. The headlights and indicators are well modelled too. There is a well reproduced interior though the steering wheel seems to be a bit oversize. There is no apparent difference to the French edition. A similar bus, with a different livery, was produced in 1:72 scale by Editions Atlas. This is a nice reproduction of a classic bus, worthy of the long wait.


News from the Continent September 2018 – Norev

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

All text by, and copyright of, the Author. Photographs supplied by the Manufacturer.

The newsletters from Norev continue to announce a wide range of models in a variety of scales. This article looks at releases from August and September.

Releases August 2018

1:12 Scale

 

121562 Citroen DS 19 Saloon 1959

Prototype shown of this very large model painted Marron glace and Carrara white.

1:18 Scale

 

183200 BMW X6 M 2016

Another prototype image showing opening parts, painted silver

 

185726 Caravan Henon 1955

As modelled by Dinky in the 1950s. Here made in a large sacle with opening components. Painted the typical white colour.

 

185230 Renault Clio Williams 1993

Model of the special edition associating Renault with their partners in Formula One Williams  – Finished in blue with the characteristic special wheels.

 

188442 Volkswagen Golf GTI 1990

Photographs of the prototype model showing opening features. Painted in grey metallic paint as so many originals were.

 

188419 Volkswagen Golf GTI “20th Anniversary 1996”

Another GTI to contrast with the 1990 car. This time in silver

1:43 Scale

 

154543 Citroen HY van 1962 – silver

 

509001 Dacia Duster 2018 – Vision brown

 

509003 Dacia Duster 2018 – Dune beige

 

517594 Renault Clio R.S. 2013 – Flame red

 

530040 Saviem S105M Coach 1969 – “Bordeaux”

1:87 Scale

 

151477 Citroen 2CV AU 1951 – grey

 

474337 Peugeot 403 Cabriolet 1957 – black

 

475462 Peugeot 504 Coupe 1971 – silver

 

576085 Simca Aronde Montlhery Speciale 1962 – grey metallic

1:43 Scale JET-CAR

 

471713 Peugeot 205 GTI 1986 – red

 

310608 Citroen C3 WRC “Rally of Mexico 2017”

310607 Renault R.S. 01 – 2015 “Oregon Team”

Releases September 2018

1:18 Scale

 

183230 BMW 507 Cabriolet 1956 – silver

 

181615 Citroen DS5 2011 – pearl white

 

181616 DS5 2015 – ink blue, white, or red

 

183464 Mercedes-Benz 560 SEL saloon 1990 – Pearl blue metallic

 

183594 Mercedes-Benz A-Class 2018 – red

 

183598 Mercedes-Benz CLA Shooting break 2015 – black

 

183592 Mercedes-Benz CLS-Class 2018 – black

 

183479 Mercedes-Benz S-Class AMG-Line 2018 – Iridium silver

 

183483 Mercedes-Benz S-Class AMG-Line 2018 – Ruby pearl metallic

 

185145 Renault Alpine A442 – Winner France 24 hours 1978 drivers Pironi / Jaussaud

1:43 Scale

 

155560 Citroen C5 Aircross 2018 – Pearl white & red decoration

155561 Citroen C5 Aircross 2018 – Volcano red & silver decoration

 

170013 DS7 Crossback Performance line 2018 – Platinum grey

 

472403 Peugeot 204 Coupe 1967 – Maroon

 

472443 Peugeot 204 Cabriolet 1967 – beige metallic

 

476503 Peugeot 605 saloon 1998 – white

 

475821 Peugeot 508 saloon 2018 – dark blue,white, or red

 

475820 Peugeot 508 GT Saloon 2018 – Ultimate red

 

473887 Peugeot 5008 GT 2016 – Pearl white

 

517704 Renault Megane RS Trophy 2014 – Pearl white

 

517744 Renault Talisman 2016 – Palatine silver

 

870054 Volvo XC90 2015 – Magic blue, white, or red

NOREV CLASSICS to 1:43 Scale

 

CL5811 Talbot-Lago T26C 1949 #24 – Louis Rosier

 

CL5812 Talbot-Lago T26C 1950 #8 – Georges Grignard

PLASTIGAM to 1:43 Scale

431020 Camion Renault Trucks D 2.1 “Eboueur” (dustbin lorry)

 

431025 Camion Renault Trucks D 2.1 “Depanneuse” (breakdown truck”

 

431035 Camion Renault Trucks D 2.1 “Benne” (dump truck)

MINIJET 1:64 Scale

 

310808 Citroen 15/6 saloon 1939 – black

 

310809 Citroen 15/6 saloon 1939 – grey

 

310704 Citroen SM 1971 “French Gendarmerie”

 

310906 Citroen C5 Aircross 2018 – grey & orange

 

310909 DS7 Crossback 2018 – gold

 

310907 Peugeot 508 saloon 2018 – blue, white, or red

 

310806 Renault Master 2014 “Fire brigade”


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News from the Continent September 2018 – Wiking

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

Text and some photos by, and copyright of the Author. Other Photographs are from the Manufacturer.

Planned Releases

Here are the Wiking Releases for October 2018. As ever this is a mix of new items and re-colours and upgrades which will be shown separately. Wiking models are made in plastic and in the EU for Germany unless otherwise stated.

New Releases

All photographs in this section provided by Wiking.

Latest Wiking Publication

0006 25 Wiking magazine 2018

1:87 Scale

0433 07 Mercedes-Benz LP 2223 high-sided flatbed truck with loading crane

 

0661 49 Krupp Ardelt crawler crane

 

0206 01 Alfa Romeo Spider

 

0183 05 BMW 2002 Police car

 

0227 08 Mercedes-Benz E-class S213 estate “Taxi”

 

0601 31 Mercedes-Benz Unimog U20 with loading crane “Fire Brigade”

 

0645 03 Magirus dump truck

 

0620 02 Magirus S 3500 turntable ladder “fire brigade”

 

0672 05 MAN TGX Euro 6c Meiller roll on-roll off dump truck

1:160 Scale

 

0949 04 Magirus flat bed truck “German Red Cross”

Model Upgrades

1:160 Scale

 

0953 04 Hanomag R16 with trailer

 

1:87 Scale

 

0877 05 Fahr tractor

 

0844 37 Hanomag K55 crawler tractor

 

0802 08 Volkswagen Beetle Convertible

 

0071 49 Opel Rekord P2 1961 Caravan estate car

 

0149 25 Mercedes-Benz 250 T-model (estate) “Taxi”

 

0789 05 Volkswagen Transporter T1b pick up with crew cab

 

0521 02 Chevrolet articulated Box truck loaded with furniture

 

0382 38 Joskin vacuum barrel trailer

 

0806 98 Henschel HS 14/16 articulated Tanker

 

0518 45 Mercedes-Benz 1620 articulated Stanchion trailer truck

Then and Now

All photographs in this section by the Author.

In the last set of upgraded models there were some interesting ones which were first issued in the 1960s.  I have the original models in my collection and so I took the opportunity to do a comparison between the original release and the current one. It also unearthed some interesting background history. All models are to 1:87 scale.

0797 33 Volkswagen T1c 1963

Camping vans were an early use of the Microbus.  Westfalia was the most popular manufacturer, and they converted the buses into “campmobiles”, many of which were exported to the United States of America. The latest release shows up to the minute details like printed curtains and a roof rack. The accurate model has the US specification vehicle with the second bumper at the front. It is a 1963 model with a widened tailgate.

Also shown are older Microbus models released by Wiking.


 

0368 02 Mercedes-Benz Unimog U401

A former Daimler-Benz aero-engine engineer developed this vehicle after the end of the Second World War. He named it “Universalmotorgerät”, in short UNIMOG. In 1948 the U 411 was shown to the public. Limited production capacity led to production being moved from the Boehringer company to Mercedes-Benz in Gaggenau.

From Autumn 1953 onwards the Unimog was available with a closed driver’s cabin, which was made by Westfalia during the earlier years. The first miniature of this type was launched by Wiking in 1956 when their range was still not glazed.

The new model is based upon the same real vehicle and the difference between the models shows the huge progress in quality and detail mould making has undergone in the last 60 or so years. The new miniature is highly detailed, some parts are moulded separately and then inserted like the radiator grille. Looking through the windows on the new model the interior can be seen. The wheels are fitted with realistic tyres with different rims front and rear. Finally the printed “UNIMOG” badging is clearly readable.


0513 22 Saviem artic. Box truck “Kronenbourg Beer”

Created when MAN and Saviem cooperated in the 1960s, when a common cabin was used for both manufacturers tractor units. It was quite easy for Wiking to create a Saviem tractor for this articulated French beer truck. Kronenbourg SAS is the biggest French brewery. It was formerly located in the Cronenbourg area of Strasbourg. In 2001 they moved to Obernai, a small Alsatian town. In a rural area there was much more space for economic expansion.  Kronenbourg has a beer market share in France of 30 %. The consolidation of the brewing industry means that today Kronenbourg is a subsidiary company of Carlsberg.

In the 1950s and 1960s different model trucks were issued in Kronenbourg like the JRD truck with a Berliet tractor shown in the photograph above.


 

0526 02 Volvo F89 articulated container truck 20´ “ASG”

In 1935 AB Svenska Godsbilcentraler was founded as a transport company. In 1978 it was re-named ASG. In 1999 the Swiss company DANZAS bought ASG and was itself bought by the German Post/DHL. ASG model trucks have long featured in the Wiking model range. So the new model of the Volvo F89 tractor with an articulated trailer carrying a 20′ container is a ‘new pearl in the string of pearls’. The model is shown above with a Scania 110 drawbar which would have operated in the ASG fleet at the same time.


 

0794 34 Volkswagen Beetle 1200 “Herbie”

In the small scale of 1:87 there was no model of Herbie available. Wiking has now released the movie star on four wheels with authentic decoration and open sun roof. However, they have made the same mistake that Tekno did many years ago Tekno in their 1:43 model. The original movie-Herbie was fitted with double-bumpers, which were developed especially for the USA, but it could be ordered as option also in Europe. Mattel/Elite fitted their models of Herbie in both scales 1:43 and 1:18 with the correct bumpers and with correct decorations but Wiking and Tekno did not.


 

0861 44 Mercedes-Benz 180 saloon “Fire Chief”

The 180 saloon is a re-issue of an old mould, which has been changed over the years. The latest release now looks like a mixture of different versions.  The front doors have no vent windows like the first 180, which was manufactured between 1953 and 1957 and the rear bumper is also fitted with overriders from this time. The front end is closer to version 180b, which was manufactured between 1959 and 1962, with a widened radiator grille and bumper without overriders


 

0100 04 Land Rover

In 1962 the Land Rover 99 appeared in a civilian version, most were moulded in green and came with or without a driver, and with canvas cover or without. A few years ago, it was issued in a range of Army vehicles, which were used in Berlin. Now it has been released moulded in the dark blue livery of the Royal Air Force, authentic logo has been printed with the blue-white-red national emblem. It also now has the spare wheel at the bonnet.


 

0279 01 Borgward mobile shop “MIGROS”

The mobile shop with movable blinds revealing a fully equipped sales room first appeared in the Wiking range in 1963. It was  moulded in white or light blue. The cab front showed a moulded radiator grille, but lacked the Borgward emblem, indeed the company was already bankrupt at this time. Now it has been re-issued with same features, but the old radiator grille was removed and the flat surface printed with a radiator grille with the Borgward emblem, the rhombus. The new model was is moulded in the colour of the Swiss company MIGROS and carries their livery on this mobile shop.


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