Category Archives: Land Rover

Big Hand Crafted Four by Fours – Part Four

By Robert Gunn

Readers of MAR magazine will have been familiar with Robert’s contributions as an expert on pickup trucks. Since retirement he has been making a selection of 4×4 vehicles by hand which he will share with us over a series of articles. All photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

The Models

The models are hand made to 1:10 scale. Each is a unique creation and when finished is displayed on a modelled plinth in a clear cabinet. Here we look at the fourth of my models the 2016 Land Rover ‘Heritage Edition’ Defender.

How the models are made

All have a softwood chassis of pine or deal. Most body sides are tempered hardboard, as are the floors, but bonnet lids are metal – either aluminium or or nickel-silver sheet. Rounded corners are of timber beading, usually hardwood. Small details are made of anything which suits from my huge boxes of bits – parts of old pens, pieces of metal or plastic, nuts and bolts, tubes and so on. Sticks of solder are good to file into manifolds, carburetors and similar. Windscreen frames are either brass sheets and strips, or latterly in sheet polystyrene plastic.

Parts which I can’t make are brought-in, such as wheels, tyres, mirrors, lights, and badges.

Glues used vary from white PVA (Woodworking Glue) through super glue, Scotch glue and others. “JB Kwik” two pack epoxy is also very useful stuff – a combined glue and filler.

Part Four – Land Rover Defender ‘Heritage Edition’ 2016

 

On it’s diorama. Real chestnut rail fencing made from a 30 year old post found in my garden.

 

Front axle and steering gear.

 

Front axle and steering gear again.

 

Underside view

 

Details of lower door hinge. Tiny screws out of an old camera. Aluminium brush finish obtained using wire brush in a mini electric drill.

A view of the engine.

 

Another engine view.

 

Interior view. Canopy lifts off to enable inside to be seen.

 

Rear view of finished model.

 

Front view of finished model. The real ‘last Defender’ had an egg-crate grille in plastic which looked a bit ugly. So I made mine in real wire mesh, like a traditional Land Rover. The etched Land Rover badges are from a specialist – they’re quite expensive but are superbly made.

 

A view of the driver’s side of the completed model showing mirrors, black grilles in the wings and a host of other fine details.

 

Higher view of the front and side of the completed model.

 

Low view of front and side of completed model.

 

Engine installed. The thick sturdy metal bonnet stay was unaltered on the real Land Rover from 1948 to the last Defender!

 

Rear corner. Lights from an eBay supplier from the Czech Republic. Tiny screws from an old camera. The ‘reversing lights’ jewel was a motor scooter’s headlamp on a Birthday card I received.

 

Rear view of completed model

 

Front/Side view of completed model.

 

Seats and console. The real ‘Last Defender’ which the factory are keeping for their museum has cream leather seats. I bought cream leather on eBay ‘same as used by Aston Martin’  and glued it over timber patterns. The seats come from a ‘Bratz Doll’ 1:10 scale Cadillac car and were much modified to the correct shape.

 

The main body early on before the ride height was adjusted by shortening the springs.

 

Rear end. Early test fit. The tailgate is brass and aluminium with hard wood ‘triangle pieces’ in corners.

 

Primed chassis and front bulkhead. Coil spring towers are pen-caps!

 

The Land Rover’s chassis. Two pieces of structural quality softwood, glued together then cut to correct profile. Wood filler has been applied and it is ready to prime.

 

The finished Land Rover on it’s diorama with chestnut fencing.

Editor – Robert’s latest project is a 1:10 scale hand made 1955 Land Rover Series One 107 inch long wheelbase pickup. We at MAR Online look forward to Robert sharing the pictures and details of that build with us when it is finished.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please contact us at our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Oxford Diecast – Range Rover Classic

By Maz Woolley

All photographs by, and copyright of, the Author except for the picture of the real car whose copyright is recognised.

Oxford Diecast‘s models from the Second Release of 2017 are now starting to arrive thick and fast. This article looks at the first release of the Range Rover Classic, so called as it was built alongside its replacement for a period of time.  Most readers will be familiar with the fact that in the 1950s Rover developed a set of prototypes of an upmarket Land Rover estate car based on the P4 chassis but with the ability to be used on or off road. The programme got so close to release that Corgi had developed a Road Rover model of its own and when Rover decided it was not going ahead with the Road Rover Corgi had to scrap theirs too.

By the 1960s the agricultural nature of the Land Rover was allowing Japanese makers like Nissan and Toyota who offered 4x4s with options of civilised cabins with nice seats and a more car like ambience to attract customers tired of the hard ride, discomfort and rudimentary cabin on even the Land Rover Estate versions.  In the US the Jeep Wagoneer and other 4x4s were much less like a truck. To fight back against this Rover developed the Range Rover powered by the 3.5 Litre V8 and with full off road capacity. It was a much more comfortable vehicle but retained the go anywhere capacity. In its initial form it was fitted with an interior that could be hosed down, rubber matting and plastic seats but the requests for a less utilitarian interior lead to an interior that became more luxurious at each upgrade.

This Lincoln Green painted model is Oxford’s first Classic Range Rover and is diecast in Oxford’s Chinese facility to 1:76 for the UK.

It is a nice model with an excellent shape. The printing is well registered and the Range Rover black script is neatly done as are the side badges .

Some have commentated very favourably about the wing mirrors but I think that their shaft is so very over scale that they may have been better left off altogether. Not all pictures of the original have mirrors and those that do are on a very spindly shaft. I guess that some collectors would not agree with me and want mirrors and are happy to live with the overscale shafts needed to prevent the mirrors breaking off.  I also think that the black printed grille should actually run along under the lights and to the level of the bumper and not end at the bottom of the grille cutouts.

At the side the wheels are good  and the mudflaps good with an exhaust exiting at the correct place. The door lock should have a black rim printed round it as the silver “blob” looks much too large and flat.

Inside there is a good matt finish suitable for this first generation of Range Rover and the typical very long gear lever. Sadly there is not the additional small lever to select low ratios next to it but in this scale that is not as obvious as it would be in 1:43. At the passenger side of the luggage area the spare wheel hanger is moulded in but no spare wheel is fitted.

The rear is generally good with the lifting rear window convincingly moulded above the handle unit and the Land Rover badge printed well. I am unconvinced by the number plates. I don’t know what process causes it but the characters are too wide for their height. In addition members of modelling boards on the web have pointed out that the lights are incorrectly printed. Checking the real vehicle myself against the model shown above, this seems to be the case. A web picture of YCX 348K as shown below confirms this.

© Land Rover Centre Huddersfield.

Oxford Diecast has often listened to criticisms of minor issues with  their initial releases and sorted them out for later ones. I hope that they do as the model is excellent apart from a few details which could be easily fixed and I look forward to it in the mid-blue and yellow/beige so many were painted.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please contact us at our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

News from the Continent August/September 2017 – Busch

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

All photographs by, and copyright of, the Manufacturer.

The releases from Busch, and allied brands, expected by the end of September are shown below. All models are moulded for Germany to 1:87 scale.

Mercedes-Benz 170V

The pleasing shaped 170V was first presented to the public in February 1936 during the 26th International Automobile and Motorcycle Exhibition (IAMA) in Berlin.

41448 Mercedes-Benz 170V Cabrio limousine – two-tone green/cream
41450 Mercedes-Benz 170V Cabrio limousine – two-tone red/cream

 

Cadillac 66 Saloon

42958 Cadillac 66 Saloon “Metallica” – silver
42960 Cadillac 66 saloon “Metallica” – blue metallic

 

Toyota Land Cruiser Crawler

43038 Toyota Land Cruiser crawler vehicle

This special power train has been in use for 15 years and has even passed strict military tests.

Mercedes-Benz 300 Landaulet

44807 Mercedes-Benz 300 State Landaulet

Only three of this type of body were built. This was in the early 1950s and they users were the German Federal Public for state occasions, the Pope for his tours, and an Arab State.

Chevrolet Bel Air

More variations upon the old Revell-Monogram 1957 Chevy moulding bought by Busch.

45045 Chevrolet Bel Air Saloon 1957 “Metallica” – grey metallic
Chevrolet Bel Air Saloon 1957 “Metallica” – red metallic

 

Cadillac Eldorado

Another long running moulding in the Busch range. Here with custom wheels and a metallic paint job.

45118 Cadillac Eldorado Cabriolet, open, “Metallica” – brown metallic
45119 Cadillac Eldorado Cabrioet, open, “Metallica” – green metallic
45121 Cadillac Eldorado Cabriolet, open, “Metallica” – silver

 

Ford Probe

The Ford Probe 24V was made from Summer 1988 to Autumn 1997 in Flat Rock, Michigan, USA. It was imported into Europe too though it was never a strong seller.

47413 Ford Probe 24V “Metallica” silver
47414 Ford Probe 24V “Metallica” red
47420 Ford Probe 24V “Sport” blue

 

Mercedes-Benz M-Class

In the livery of the German motor rescue outfit.

 

48546 Mercedes-Benz M-Class facelift “ADAC”

Land Rover Defender

50361 Land Rover Defender “Carabinieri”

Caribinieri are a special Police Force unit in Italy.

 

50363 Land Rover defender “DLRG” with surfboard

This vehicle is equipped for rescue activities. The Deutsche Lebens-Rettungs-Gesellschaft e.V. (DLRG)  is the German Life Saving Group and is the biggest such organisation in the world.

Smart Fortwo

50712 Smart Fortwo Coupe 2014 “German Police”

Mercedes-Benz V and G Class

Many public services represented here. From the Fire Brigade to the Emergency Doctor Service and the Technical Assistance Service.

51169 Mercedes-Benz V-Class “Fire Brigade of Karlstein
51411 Mercedes-Benz G-Class 1990 Emergency Doctor
51460 Mercedes-Benz G-Class 2008 THW

EsPeWe IFA W50

95231 IFA W50LA TLF16 GMK “Fire brigade of Ellrich

The TLF16 appliance went into production in 1985 based upon the 4×4 chassis of the IFA W50.


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