Category Archives: Kässbohrer

Hachette Italy World Buses Part 19

By Fabrizio Panico

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

Numbers 55 to 57

 

Three successful buses, one from France and two from Germany, each one representative of a decade, from the fifties to the seventies. All of them are from the Italian Hachette partwork “Autobus dal mondo”, a collection of eighty 1:43 scale bus models, very similar to the French one “Autobus et autocars du monde”, produced in Bangladesh for Ixo.

 

No. 55 (no. 44 in the French collection) Renault R 4192 1956 – We have already met Renault and its AGP Saharien (see part seven, no. 19) and TN6-C2 (see part twelve, no. 34).

Renault is one of the oldest automobile manufacturers,  established in 1899 and by 1903 it was manufacturing its own engines and by 1906 it had introduced its first commercial truck. Renault experienced formidable development after the Great War, taking advantage of the industrial power acquired during the conflict the brand consolidated its place in the commercial vehicles market. In 1945 Renault was nationalised and its resources were concentrated on the new 4CV and one ton trucks. After the Second World War Renault slowly incorporated many of its competitors. In 1955 it formed Saviem (Société Anonyme de Véhicules Industriels et d’Equipements Mécaniques) with Latil and Somua. In 1957 it bought Isobloc and in 1960 Chausson. In 1978 the Renault name was back, when Saviem grouped with Berliet forming RVI (Renault Véhicules Industriels).

In 1946 the demand for vehicles of all kinds was growing quickly and Renault presented the 215 D, an advanced-cab bus, closely derived from the ZPD, and bodied on the chassis of the 208 D truck, a prewar concept. But the competition was very strong and soon Renault presented the new chassis-less R 4190. The engine was now placed horizontally on the right side between the two axles, and the body had a rounded shape with a chromed grille. It was an instant success and was produced in many different versions (the R 4192 is a low roof version). In line with company policy in 1955 it gained the Saviem logo, in 1957 it was restyled and renamed the Saviem ZR2. In 1960 a new engine was adde and it was renamed again to the SC1. By 1965 it was named the  S45 and it went on until 1993, with periodic updates.

The model is shaped accurately, the body is plastic while the chassis is metal with lot of details. It has single rear wheels. Many additional small parts are used as usual, like lights, front bumper, mirror (one only) and registration plates, plus a large ladder to reach the luggage area on the roof.  The long bars along the roof are very nice, these were used to fix the canvas cover to protect the baggage. The livery seems to be authentic and neatly printed.

There are no indications of a transport company, only the destination plate (Clermont) and the registration plates (63) from the Puy-de-Dôme department (region Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, prefecture Clermont-Ferrand, headquarters of the French tyre manufacturer Michelin).

 

The red circle on the front and rear means that the vehicle runs a regular service. The interior is quite basic, but it has a nice driver area. Also well reproduced are the doors, the windows and the wheels. There are no apparent differences to the French edition. A nice reproduction of a once familiar sight on French roads.

 

No. 56 (no. 46 in the French collection) Setra S 215 HD 1976 – Setra is a brand we have already met with the Setra-Seida S14 (see part eight, no. 24). Founded in 1951, its origins are from the Wagenfabrik Kässbohrer, founded in 1893 in Ulm, while its name is short for “selbsttragend” (self supporting), referring to the integral nature of the construction. Until 1995 the firm operated under the name Kässbohrer-Setra, but in that year economic difficulties forced its sale to Daimler Benz, and to operate as a division of EvoBus GmbH. Standardisation and modularity were Setra’s winning features. The integral construction allowed changes to the wheelbase, the engine, and the interior fittings. The series 200 was presented in 1976.

 

Its models are identified by the maximum number of rows of seats (like 15 for this bus), while the letters added after the type number indicate the equipment and features, like HD for Hochdecker (high floor). The engine was located behind the rear axle, usually a diesel by Mercedes-Benz Henschel, here a V8 delivering 256 HP. The body shape was indeed a glass box with flat sides and large sealed windows, a huge slightly inclined windscreen,  and an unobtrusive front grille. Almost perfect, it was very successful and was  produced until 1991, to be replaced by the new 315.

The quite large scale model is true to the original shape and the livery is authentic, created by Setra itself to commemorate the forty years of the series 200. As usual it has a plastic body and metal baseplate. The baseplate is largely undetailed apart a silver painted exhaust. Many small separate parts are fitted like mirrors, lights, bumpers, grille, wipers. It looks very real indeed from a picture you could almost believe that it is the real vehicle.

A nice driver area is included but the seats are basic. There are well reproduced wheels (twin at the rear axle) with the chromed hubcaps adorned with the “K” of Kässbohrer. The German registration plates are from Ulm and the code number (S 215) is a clear reminder of the bus name. No apparent differences to the French issue. An accurate reproduction of a bus known all over Europe.

 

No. 57 (no. 57 in the French collection) Büssing Senator 12 D 1964Büssing AG was established in 1903 in Braunschweig (Germany) by Heinrich Büssing, heir of a blacksmith dynasty and founder of many bicycle, engineering and railway signal works. From heavy duty trucks to omnibus and armoured cars, Büssing soon developed into one of the largest European producers. In 1923 it presented the first rigid three-axle chassis and the world’s first full-size bus which allowed Büssing to lead the market share in Germany in commercial vehicles. In 1934 Büssing took over NAG. After the Second World War civilian production was resumed and in 1950 the company name became Büssing Nutzkraftwagen GmbH while production was concentrated on underfloor-engined trucks.

The company was taken over by MAN AG in 1971, which continued production of its underfloor-engined truck range through to the late 1980s, still using Büssing’s Brunswick Lion emblem. We have already met MAN and its 535 HO (see part fifteen, no. 43). The Senator 12 D was part of a new bus family (11R, 12R, 13R and 15R) launched in 1959.

 

The self-supporting bodywork was based on welded steel tubes and was fitted with a rear underfloor six inline diesel engine. Both city and long distance versions were made in different lengths and with different interior designs. Their names were changed regularly: Konsul, was followed by Senator, President and Prefekt. During the sixties they represented about 50% of all the buses in Germany. The Senator 12 D was presented in 1965 and gained an enlarged engine producing 150 HP. Their robustness and reliability combined with good performance allowed them to perform a very long working life with many still in service until the eighties.

This is another nice reproduction. Again with a  plastic body and metal baseplate, which in this case is well detailed with twin rear wheels. A red and cream livery is used, probably from the city of Hamburg based on the registration plates and the destination board (Altona train station). A neat “Lion” emblem can be seen on the front and the rear. The model has the usual added plastic parts like lights, bumper, mirrors, and destination boards. Like the other buses covered in this article it has a basic interior. The windows are well reproduced and on the sides is a well printed advert for the AEG washing machine. No apparent differences to the French issue. Another good choice, a well known bus.


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JC-Jägerndorfer

By Robin Godwin

All photographs by, and copyright of the Author unless otherwise stated.

Who is JC-Jägerndorfer? As far as I can tell, it is a large Austrian toy retailer. They also have certain products manufactured for them to sell under the Jägerndorfer brand, and perhaps even act as the middleman/manufacturer contact for promotional products.  Most of their “brand name“ products revolve around the Austrian skiing industry; ski lifts and Pisten Bullys, but they also produce trains in HO and N scales. But it is the Jägerndorfer 1:43 diecast Pisten Bully line that I’ll feature here (they also do 1:32 diecast Pisten Bullys as well as radio control ones). The Pisten Bully 600 shown is what appears to be a promotional model for Kässbohrer, judging by the packaging. Although the Jägerndorfer company detail is there, it is clearly designed to highlight the real machine.

It is a well-done diecast, perhaps not ROS (Italy) overall quality, but arguably better in one important aspect – the tracks. ROS tracks are like the old Solido tanks or modern tracked plant (construction) crawlers – all metal linked construction. Real Pisten Bullys feature a rubber track with aluminum (or aluminium for UK readers) or stainless steel cleats for traction, so an all-metal track is nice but incorrect. The Jägerndorfer model features more accurate vinyl/rubber tracks, improving the scale look significantly. The tracks feature a barely noticeable join, which means they are moulded flat. When looking at the pictures, it would seem that the manufacturer has painted the cleats greyish to look like metal. Closer inspection shows it is not paint at all but what looks like an advanced manufacturing process – the cleats would be the “deepest” part of the mould, and it appears those depressions have been filled with grey vinyl/rubber, and then the rest of the track mould has been filled with black vinyl/rubber. The two colours have bonded to each other to appear as a one-piece moulding, but with perfect colour separation. The net result is very impressive and, as mentioned, more realistic than all-metal tracks. My only criticism of the model is that, other than the cab and plow (plough) blade, almost everything else is made of plastic.

The photos show a comparison between a slightly earlier version of a PB 600 by ROS and a previous century PB 300 by German company Brami (now defunct). The Brami has “Made in EU” cast on the base, but the other two give no indication of where they were actually made. Retail price point vs model detail would imply Chinese manufacture, but I don’t know for certain. I also do not think the PB600 models were ultimately made by the same manufacturer (in China, I suspect), as there are virtually no common parts.

There is a new Jägerndorfer PB100 model available in 1:43 scale, but this is not yet indicated on the website (below). The full range of models from Jagerndorfer, from last year, is available as a catalogue download from the website, but there have been no updates for at least a year. See www.jaegerndorfer.at

JC Jägerndorfer Pisten Bully 600 Polar SCR featuring excellent detail. Note seamless colour separation between grey and black on tracks
JC Jägerngorfer on the left, with ROS older generation PB600 on right. The 600 Polar SCR features upgraded hydraulics and engine, among other smaller improvements. ROS has all metal tracks – nice but inaccurate
JC Jägerndorfer, left, and ROS, right. The Jägerndorfer retails for less than the ROS and can be ordered off the website listed in the article.
JC Jägerndorfer, left, Brami, right. Brami has rubber tracks, but nowhere near the quality of the JC Jägerndorfer. Brami also lacks many fine details evident in modern models. I bought my Brami in 1998
Brami base, indicating Made in EU
Packaging, which all appears to be promotional. Brami top. ROS middle, JC Jägerndorfer bottom
Same boxes, same order, but end view

Back of JC Jägerndorfer box with technical detail. Small print on right hand side is the only reference to the JC Jägerndorfer company

Back of ROS box. No Technical detail, but also only a small reference to the ROS company

Brami box states clearly “Made in EU… “
Superb detail on the 1:43 scale JC Ja1gerndorfer model. Note join on bottom of track. Neither cab nor bed are openable (but they are on the ROS model)

(Thanks to Hans Georg Schmitt for help on Jägerndorfer research).


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Atlas Buses Collection

By Gunnar Bernstrup

This article was originally hosted on the first MAR Online website. As access to that site is no longer available from zeteo.com we have copied over a number of articles to ensure that they are saved for the future. This article has been adapted from its original form to appear in this blog.
These models are produced for Atlas in China to 1:72 scale and the Author’s photographs of some of this range may be seen below.

Atlas releases are confusing. Like a lucky dip you never know what you get next time. Certainly the releases often appear out of sequence. When I started collecting the European Bus collection and writing about it, I was ‘advised’ in MAR and on a Swedish collector site, that I had missed the Scania D11 (1964) and that Atlas would not send me one. So I bought one on EBay and now Atlas has sent me one too. So now I have two what do I do with the second one?

It appears that after just over 30 models the partwork has reached its end.

I’d say all the models are good. Very good. Choosing a favourite then very much depends on my own memories or impressions of the real thing. I love the rounded forms on the Volvo B375 from the late 1950s when I was a kid. I do like the MB Lop 1935, a simple but for its time modern design, though I wasn’t around then to see them operating myself! The ‘Holland Coach’, ‘dressed’ in the colors of my home team Malmoe FF, Swedish champions and at the moment playing in the the Champions League, look so friendly with good touches from the advertisements along the roof line. Saurer Swiss Post models are always nice too, I guess I have a soft spot for bonetted buses. Finally, the Opel Blitz 54 is diminutive, but rather cheerful model.

Some are less to my taste. The Fiat 306 is a boring bus in a rather boring all blue color. The Volvo B57 is dull in all green as well: Shoe boxes on wheels. The Robur Garant and the DDR Star N52 were again not favourites. The Star N52 is really ugly, but then so was the original, an overbodied small vehicle. Even my much wanted Scania D11 isn’t a very inspiring bus, but it’s well modelled.

Edition ATLAS Bus Collection

7163101 Kässbohrer S8 red/white
7163102 Borgward BO 4000 grey/blue
7163103 Henschel HS 100 N maroon
7163104 Saurer L4C swiss post
7163105 Büssing DSU Berlin
7163106 M-B O 3500 blue/white
7163107 Van Hool 3006 grey
7163108 IFA H6 creme
7163109 Magirus-Detz Saturn II orange/cream
7163110 Holland Coach 1955 light blue/white
7163111 Steyr 3380q ‘marooninsh’ red/white
7163112 Krupp Titan black
7163113 Brossel Jonckheere red/cream
7163114 Leyl.RTW LT-red
7163115 Büssing Senator 12D cream
7163116 Skoda 706 RTO 1963 creme
7163117 Ikarus 66 1955 creme
7163118 Fiat 306/3 blue
7163119 Volvo B 616 1:76 grey/red
7163120 FleischerS5 1977 creme
7163121 Scania Vabis D11/64 orange/creme
7163122 Reo Speedwagon white/black
7163123 Tatra 500 HB 1950 cream/blue
7163124 Ikarus 311 red/white
7163125 Volvo B375 red
7163126 MB LoP 300 1935 begie, brown
7163127 Robur Garant yellow/brown
7163128 Star N52 1953 green
7163129 Volvo B57 -72 green
7163130 Neoplan NH9L creme/white
7163131 Opel Blitz -54 blue/white
7163111 Steyr 380 Q 1955 Maroon/White

 

Volvo B375

Volvo B57

Star N52

Scania Vabis D11

Robur Garant

Opel Blitz

Mercedes-Benz LoP3500

Magirus-Deutz Saturn

Krupp Titan

Kassbohrer Setra S8

Holland Coach

Borgward BO4000

Ikarus 66

Mercedes-Benz Coach

Steyr 380Q