Category Archives: Jaguar

GFCC Toys – Jaguar SS1

By Maz Woolley

Photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

Earlier this month Graeme Ogg introduced us to the 1959 Pontiac model in this range. Now the Jaguar SS1 mentioned in that article has arrived from a China based eBay trader. Although called a Jaguar SS1 It should just be an SS1 as the name Jaguar was adopted by William Lyons after the production of the SS1 had finished.

This model is very different to the Pontiac Graeme covered. The SS1 being similar to earlier Dinky models with no glazing, suspension or interior. However, the bumpers and lights are solid shiny silver metal as are the wheels which is a little different to Dinky. The GFCC Jaguar SS1 model is available in dark red, cream, and dark green.

The model is well shaped with the lovely flowing rear end and a nicely detailed and painted grille, though that could have been painted to represent the silver radiator shell as well but has not been. It is based upon the Airline streamlined body available in the mid-1930s.

It is curious that the box of the Pontiac was artificially aged but the box for this older style model is not. More surprising still is the fact that the spare wheels are not fixed to the car at all and only stay on the running boards when pressed hard into the depressions moulded for them.

My model was sent from China but GFCC seems to be a registered brand of Tongbo Toys. This brand is registered in Europe as well as the US and may be a trading company brand rather than a pure producer. Maybe they pick up models developed in China for other ranges or speculatively and not proceeded with?

I will certainly keep my eyes open for what comes next from GFCC Toys.


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Tekno Wossat – Shedding some light

By Robin Godwin

Photographs are by, and copyright of the Author.

Back in November 2016, the editor posted my Wossat article on an unidentified Jaguar E-Type Roadster in 1:43 scale that had clearly been copied from the earlier Tekno model http://www.maronline.org.uk/tekno-wossat/

Well, I can now shed some light on the topic (hopefully you will forgive me for that as you read on) as I have now found a second, more complete example. The pictures show that this must have been a (possibly commercial) display model of some sort. I didn’t realise it when inspecting the first model for the earlier article, but the headlights are operative! The unexplained hole in the base is the pass through for the wiring to the headlights, and on re-inspection of my first model, I can see wires thru the hole in the base leading to the lights that were cut to make it a static display model.

The model is mounted to a chromed circular base with screws via the two screw holes discussed in the first article. A rotary switch turns the headlights on and off. But there is more – there’s an electric motor hidden in the chrome base with the drive axle protruding from the bottom, so it is evident that the whole chromed brace would rotate with the model fixed on it. I know nothing about electricity (except on and off), so cannot verify if the light switch also activated the motor via the two AA batteries, but if that were true, then my motor is inoperative. I don’t see any further attachment points for electricity supply, nor is there a pass through in the plastic insert for additional wires if the power source was exterior to the batteries housed in the chromed base. That said, there is obviously still something missing, as this whole structure would have been mounted to something else, but what? Of note, both the electric motor and white plastic insert to the chromed base, visible in the pictures, are marked “Japan” so that may be a clue to it’s origin. Japan has an early history of copying models, and the original Tekno E-Type was from the 1960s, but I can only speculate here.

I’ll continue to try to get to the bottom of this mystery.

 

4216 Lights on and firmly attached to chrome base

 

4218 This angle shows the on/off switch for lights and perhaps even for rotation of the whole unit

4221 Plastic disc on left fits snugly into the round chrome base. Hole in centre allow for axle of electric motor to pass thru, but no room for anything else. Motor is firmly attached to the chrome base, so the whole unit would have rotated on an additional base of some sort


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Neo and BoS September/October 2017

By Maz Woolley

All photographs supplied by, and copyright of, ModelCarWorld.

Market Positioning

Over the last year we have seen prices steadily rising from many suppliers. ModelCarWorld who own Neo, MCG, BoS and other ranges appear to be trying to contain their price rises in the same way that Oxford Diecast are. For example Neo models are now about 25% cheaper than Matrix models and MCG 1:18 scale models are about the same price as a 1:43 MaxiChamp. In contrast their BoS 1:87 scale models have crept up in price and now look rather expensive though their only competition is German made and is quite expensive too.

Many of the models shown are re-colours of previously released castings.

1:18 Scale

ModelCarWorld have models made for them in China to 1:18 scale. BoS models are resin cast and Model Car Group are diecast. Neither range has opening parts.

BoS-Models.

 

213751 Oldsmobile Rocket 88, Black 1949

 

213725 Triumph TR 7 DHC, Metallic Beige, RHD 1976

 

215128 Cadillac Fleetwood Series 75, Black 1967

 

214628 Jaguar XJ 4.2C, Yellow/Black, RHD 1974

 

214633 Maserati 5000 GT Allemano, Red 1960

 

Model Car Group (MCG)

 

220257 Barkas B 1000 Halbbus, Volkspolizei 1970

 

209979 Tatra 87, Silver and Dark Red 1937

 

220256 Wolga M24-10, Red 1985

1:43 Scale

Neo

All these models are moulded in resin in China for Germany.

There have been few 1:43 BoS releases lately and some recent Neo models have been regarded as BoS finish for Neo prices. Comments have been made suggesting the red shade shown in the pictures of the second issue of the Humber Sceptre is too bright and is also incorrectly sprayed at the rear where the red colour should go into the “V” round the rear lights and does not.

ModelCarWorld are certainly getting the most out of their S & S 1966 Ambulance moulding producing it in a variety of colours and equipment. The Buick Flxible Premier has recently been seen modelled by Ixo in the German Atlas series of Ambulances which may limit the sales of the Neo.

 

186011 Humber Sceptre MK I, Red and White, RHD 1963

 

186015 Morgan Plus 4 Plus, Red, RHD

 

180791 Cadillac S&S Ambulance Fire Rescue

 

156253 Cadillac S&S Ambulance, White 1966

 

215306 Dodge Sportsman, Metallic Green and White 1973

 

213737 Mercedes C111-IID, Metallic dark Orange 1976

 

156314 Cadillac S & S Ambulance, Red/White 1966

 

167757 Cadillac S&S Landau Hearse, Black

 

215577 Buick Flxible Premier,Red/White 1960 Ambulance

 

192388 Maybach SW35 Stromlinie Spohn, Black and Brown  1935

1:87 Scale

BoS Models

These resin models made in China for Germany replaced the previous Neo 1:87 range which was expensive and sold slowly with ModelCarWorld still having some available for bargain prices long after the range was stopped. The BoS 1:87 Range was supposed to offer similar interesting subjects but with less expensive finishing. Even so some models still feature p-e parts and some fine details.

For me the most interesting of this months releases are the tractor units from Pegaso and Bernard, though these are quite a bit more expensive than the cars. They certainly add options for 1:87 collectors and if they stick to cab units that the mainstream 1:87 producers are unlikely to release they could sell well.

215516 Mercedes AMG G 63 6×6, Metallic-Beige 2013

 

215124 Pegaso Comet, Beige and Brown 1964

 

218690 Horch 853 Special Coupe, Black 1937

 

214786 Studebaker Commander Starliner, red/white 1953

215122 Bernard TD 150, Light Blue 1955


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Oxford Diecast XK150 Roadster

By Maz Woolley

Oxford Diecast have now released their XK150 in Carmen Red which somehow looks more exciting than in white as it was before. This model is to 1:43 scale and diecast in Oxford’s China plant for the UK.

The XK150 roadster was the last development of the original XK shape before the E Type replaced it in 1961. It is beautiful classic car and the Oxford model is welcome especially as a Roadster as the Drophead Coupé was made in the Matchbox Dinky range.

The car Oxford based this model on can be seen on the web and the model is largely correct, though I think the interior may be in red or tan leather and the dashboard should probably be red with a sliver inset panel. However, this is not an issue on a model in this price range as the interior is generally accurate with items picked out on the door cards and for a budget priced model the dash detail has been nicely done with white panel printed instruments. There is a lovely steering wheel with chromed spokes and wooden rim too.

The Oxford model has with lovely paint and excellent “chrome fitments” for the most part. However, when you look close at the model I bought you can see issues which really shouldn’t exist.

Firstly you can see above the chrome number plate surround is miss-shaped and shorter on one side.  Secondly when supplied one of the rear light clusters was at an angle which I have carefully corrected for the photographs, and finally the printing of the rear lights was badly offset.

 

It really is a shame that these faults should exist as it does mar what is otherwise excellent model from Oxford Diecast.


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Atlas Jaguar Collection is complete

By Maz Woolley

Advert below for this collection from the Atlas Editions UK Website.

Atlas Customer Service has confirmed that the Atlas Jaguar Series is now complete after 31 parts. It has been a well balanced collection of Jaguars from the SS1 to the latest models and includes their key sports racing cars too.  I was personally particularly pleased to get a well made Jaguar S Type.  I have only had a few quality control issues and despite being fitted with many small parts the models have survived the journey well even if the boxes have not always done so. I have listed all the parts below and pictures of them all can be seen in reviews elsewhere in MAR Online, just search using “Atlas Jaguar” in the search box to find them.

One wonders what series they will launch to replace this. Having test marketed the Mercedes Series one wonders if that will be launched shortly?

  • E Type
  • Mark II
  • XK140 Convertible
  • D Type
  • SS1 Airline
  • Mark VII
  • C Type
  • XJR 9
  • XK Coupe
  • XKR S
  • XKSS
  • XJ8
  • XJ-S
  • Mark 10
  • E-Type Coupe
  • XJ12c
  • Mark IV 3.5 litre
  • F Type Coupe
  • Mark IX
  • XFR
  • Mark I
  • XK150 Convertible
  • XJ
  • Mark V
  • XK120
  • S-Type
  • XJ6 Series 1
  • 240
  • XJR12
  • X-Type
  • F Type Cabriolet

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TSM Jaguar F Pace

By John Quilter

All photographs taken by, and copyright of, the Author.

True Scale Models, also known as TSM, have recently launched a 1:43 scale replica of the new Jaguar F Pace, Jaguar’s first entry into the cross over market. The TSM model reviewed is in Rodium silver with a black interior although they also offer a white version.

This version is in left hand drive and is fitted with the silver 20” “Venom” wheels. Other photos of this model show it with black “Venom” wheels. For a period the official Jaguar UK website showed a bright blue version in the scale models section of their accessories listings.

Jaguar North America’s website does show some 1:43 scale models but no F Pace currently. There is no model brand shown on these websites but it is assumed that TSM makes these available to Jaguar UK for marketing as promotional items much as BMW, Mercedes, VW, and others have done for a number of years. Inspecting the underside of this model shows no chassis detail except for two silver rear silencers and there is no indication it is a TSM product.

The model comes on an elegant white display plinth inside a clear plastic cover and that in turn is inside of a clear Perspex cover.


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Atlas Jaguar Collection – F type Cabriolet

By Maz Woolley

 

The latest issue in the Atlas Jaguar Collection has been released recently. It is an F type Cabriolet in metallic blue. This follows and earlier issue of the F type “R” Coupe reviewed elsewhere by MAR Online http://www.maronline.org.uk/atlas-jaguar-collection-jaguar-f-type-r/.

Checking images on the web this model appears to use the same casting as the Lunar Grey LHD model already issued by Ixo and an orange LHD model issued by Whitebox.

Here the model is in RHD form and in a blue metallic colour which is attractive but fades at all the panel gaps under any lighting as can be seen on the photograph below. As usual the wheels and tyres are good with brake calipers showing nicely, though one tyre on my model has a chunk out of it.

As can be seen the above the printed leaper logo at the rear is a little thin and one dimensional and as shown below the badging at the front is not as good as Ixo usually manage either. The inserted light clusters front and rear are good but the bonnet and wing inserts are a little basic and the wing ones are not neatly printed as the silver edges are “wavy”.  The grille is a little basic, not capturing the mesh detail particularly well, and the silver line round it is not properly printed on the driver’s side either.

The interior again disappoints. Although the seats and door cards are nicely done the dashboard has been crudely moulded with detail far from being crisp and only two instruments printed on. One wonders if a rush job was done to make a RHD format dash assembly. The picture below also shows how the front screen is not a good fit to the frame leaving an unrealistic gap.

So all in all this is a nice casting which has been let down by small details and the standard of finish. This perhaps indicates the cost pressures that are now being felt by Chinese producers.


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Tin Tin Mark 10 makeover

By John Sharpe

John is a retired mechanic who spends quite a lot of his time running and restoring real cars and who has a love of Saabs and Jaguars. Running a Saab and a Citroen Ambulance and having an E Type awaiting restoration. After an email discussion with the editor about the relative accuracy of Atlas, Norev, and Atlas Tintin models he decided to have a go at turning the Tintin car pictured below into a standard saloon.

  

Little did I know when I set out on this conversion that it would turn out to be so problematic. I painted and polished and it looked lovely, but then the troubles started. When I tried to apply the centre bonnet line it bled through the masking tape, so I finished up re-spraying the bonnet. Then to cap it all the new masking tape that I was using round the windows pulled off most of the window silver surround I had painted so I had to do it all again without masking. After that all I had to do was to touch in around the roof with the colour used.

When I looked at the Tintin models interior I found that the build quality was atrocious The seats had been glued down askew and epoxy glue had been used as if it was going out of fashion!

Although you can’t see it in the pictures I got carried away with the interior two tone seats, wooden door capping, dashboard and steering wheel and the final touch, a privacy partition, The seats were covered in a plastic tissue type of material the lighter colour first, then the darker panels spaced to look like duo tone seats.

Editors tip – I find that standing the model on its end well supported is necessary to get front lights to set symmetrically when using Krystal Klear and I think that the same technique would work gluing on jewels with white glue.

I managed to find some self adhesive clear jewels for the front lamps of varying sizes, but they keep slipping down.This is my first foray into customising any model this small. On any future ones I may leave the window frames unpainted as trying to emulate Oxford or MInichamps is difficult.

Comparing the converted model with the Atlas Mark 10 shown above it rides lower but I think that helps it  has more presence. And with the square axles fitted to the Tintin Jaguar it won’t roll off the shelf!

Anyway here is my first attempt at making a small conversion. It nearly went in the bin twice, but I kept persevering, I may even buy another and try again!

Editor: We would like to thank John for sharing the story of his conversion and encourage other readers to do the same. 


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Atlas Jaguar Collection – X Type

By Maz Woolley

 

The latest model to arrive in this series is a Jaguar X Type. The car modelled is the 2.0 Diesel introduced in 2003. The X Type was built when Jaguar was owned by Ford. It was an attempt by Jaguar to compete with the BMW 3 Series,  Audi A4, and Mercedes-Benz C Class. To make such a car profitably Jaguar had to design a car based upon the chassis of the Ford Mondeo of the day and to build it in a Ford Factory. Its sales were held back by purists not regarding it as a “true Jaguar” whilst others quickly realised that the top line Mondeos were better equipped and cheaper.

This model is made by Ixo for Atlas and we have already seen this casting used in the Premium X range I believe, see John Quilter’s article about those models at  http://www.maronline.org.uk/premium-x-jaguar-x-type/. Here the casting does not have a sunroof but retains the leaper which is not entirely accurate for a UK market car, though many owners did fit them as an accessory. This casting lacks the sunroof fitted to the Premium X Car but otherwise looks very similar though the Atlas is RHD and not LHD.

The model looks good in solid blue though the metallic silver/blue which was very common here in the UK might have been a better choice.  The printed badging and boot trim is very good.

Inside the matt finish to the dashboard top, seats and door cards is excellent and the dashboard with its instruments printed and wood effect dash panel are good too. Looking at the steering wheel even the ancillary stalks are fitted to the steering column and the wheel itself is nicely modelled and has the Jaguar boss printed in the middle.

Outside good mirrors with printed glass and good, if perhaps over shiny, alloy wheels are fitted. The flush fitting “glass” is excellent employing the four separate inserted window sections: front, side and rear with printed black edges seen before in this series.

The Atlas Jaguar Collection may now be drawing towards its close as their Customer Service team recently stated that the series would probably finish after the 31st model is produced.

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Matrix announcements for May/June 2017

By Maz Woolley

All photographs supplied by Matrix and are of prototypes not shipped models. Shipping dates shown are as forecast by Matrix

Expected in May

 

MX51705-272 Rolls-Royce Phantom Barker Torpedo Tourer

Car owned by HRH Maharaja of Kota #23RC with Canon “Tiger edition” red and silver 1925

Expected in June

 

MX41607-081 Singer Porsche 911 blue 2014 

MX41001-012 Jaguar XK140 Ghia 2-door Coupe red 1955 


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