Category Archives: Jaguar

Wiking Models March 2019

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

All text by, and copyright of the Author. All photographs provided by the Manufacturer.

Here is the latest news on the releases from Wiking in various scales. All these models are moulded in plastic in Europe for Germany.

Toy Fair “Silver News”

1:32 Scale

JCB Fasttrac 8000

John Deere 4-track 9RX – first articulated caterpillar

John Deere 7310R with twin tyres

Manitou MLT 635 telehandler

Krampe hook lift THL 30 L

1:87 Scale

Here are pre-release prototypes in plain silver plastic as shown at the Nuremberg Toy Fair earlier this year.


DKW 3=6 transporters 1955-1962

Büssing 4500

This model has been made using new moulds.


Mercedes-Benz LP 333 “Millipede” [Tausendfuessler]

Mercedes-Benz long distance Pullman cab

Bonneted tractor units with flat bed for heavy loads

Older tractor units get new trailers.

IHC 1455 XL tractor

New hose reel accessories for Rosenbauer AT

Volvo L350H wheel loader

New Items April 2019

1:87 Scale

0652 03 Volvo L 350F wheel loader

0368 03 Mercedes-Benz Unimog U401

0797 23 Volkswagen Transporter T1 Samba bus

0360 01 Mercedes-Benz Unimog S 404 globetrotter motor home

0224 47 Renault R4 fire brigade

0262 06 Citroen HY box van fire brigade
0623 03 Mercedes-Benz L 5000 fire brigade emergency vehicle

0430 20 Mercedes-Benz L 3500 makeshift wine tanker

0488 02 Henschel HS 165 T articulated flatbed truck ‘Haulier Schulze’, of Berlin.

0459 01 Mercedes-Benz 1638 drawbar for hauliers ‘Brothers Mönkemöller’

Model Upgrades April 2019

1:160 Scale


0982 42 Büssing 8000 articulated tanker ‘FINA’

1:87 Scale


0817 06 Jaguar E-Type roadster – yellow

0225 03 Renault R4 box van ‘Renault Service’

0290 02 Volkswagen Transporter T1 pick up ‘IKEA’

0092 38 T&B Caravan

0510 01 Magirus S3500 articulated flatbed truck

0388 16 Joskin tipper trailer

0631 02 Mercedes-Benz short bonnet breakdown truck

0460 01 Scania 111 flat bed drawbar

0990 95 Set “Porsche Tractor”

Matrix Models April 2019

By Maz Woolley

All text by, and copyright of the Author. All photographs provided by the Manufacturer.

Matrix has recently announced last release in April and future releases for May 2019. As ever a fascinating mix of models with a significant number of historical sports cars in addition to the coach built specials we expect to see.

All the models announced are moulded in resin to 1:43 scale and finished with photo-etchings. They are made in China for the Netherlands. Unfortunately there are only a few illustrations of the models available, most being illustrated by photographs of the real car which do not give us any chance to evaluate how good the model is.

Most of the models shown are new mouldings and announced for the first time, whilst others are new models that have been announced previously.

Expected April 2019

MX40604-062 Ferrari 212 Inter Coupe Vignale red / black 1953

Another version of the 212 Inter in well chosen colours and with Matrix good wire wheels. The interior models the tan leather seating well.

Expected May 2019


No photograph of Model issued by Supplier

MX40205-022 Bugatti T40 Roadster yellow / black 1921

MX40205-071 Bugatti T55 Roadster yellow / black 1932

A nice model of a classic Bugatti with typical nice Bugatti wheels well captured and the yellow stripe round the wings and running boards well applied.


No photograph of Model issued by Supplier

MX40205-072 Bugatti T55 Roadster black / red 1932


MX41001-021 Lister – Jaguar racing green 1958

A British motor racing classic. Designed around the straight six Jaguar engine that had powered the D Type.


No photograph of Model issued by Supplier

MX41001-102 Jaguar Pirana Bertone green metallic 1967


MX51001-061 Jaguar V12 Kensington Italdesign concept silver 1990

This is a design study that looks to the Author like a stretched Rover 75 and it was yet another attempt by an Italian designer to clothe Jaguars in a newer style of body in an era where they were determinedly traditional.


No photograph of Model issued by Supplier

MX51001-062 Jaguar V12 Kensington Italdesign concept green 1990

No photograph of Model issued by Supplier


MXR41001-021 Lister-Jaguar Daily Express Silverstone Moss #29 first green 1958

Malcolm Campbell was fond of fast cars for private use as well as for setting records. He had raced Type 37A Bugatti cars in grand prix races in France before he set his sight on world record breaking. His private cars were painted the same colour as the Bluebird record cars. A tradition his son, Donald Campbell, kept up. The model looks like it captures the Bugatti lines very well and the colour is convincing.

MX40205-091 Bugatti T57S Corsica Roadster Malcolm Campbell #57531 blue 1937

No photograph of Model issued by Supplier

MX40205-092 Bugatti T57S Corsica Roadster Malcolm Campbell #57531 blue half open 1937

No photograph of Model issued by Supplier

MX41607-082 Singer Design Porsche 911 orange 2014

No photograph of Model issued by Supplier

MX50205-022 Bugatti T101 Antem Coupe green 1951

A curious beast! Campers seem to be very popular models at the moment with a continental partwork given over entirely to them. Here Matrix do not credit the maker of the camper section and a whilst a search of the internet showed up a photograph of this camper at a show it did not give details of the maker. Perhaps the printed details to the rear of the caravan might give the maker away but the photograph’s resolution is not detailed enough to see what it says.


MX50304-061 Citroen ID Camper blue / gold 1973


MXR41302-011 Mercedes-Benz 300SLR Mille Miglia Jenkinson / Moss #722 winner 1955

The famous winner of the Mille MIglia modelled here with tyhe passenger area covered and with what looks like two flyscreens. This is curious as the car run in the race had a single one piece full with screen and was open on passenger and driver’s sides as Denis Jenkinson sat there alongside Stirling Moss.


No photograph of Model issued by Supplier

MXR41302-012 Mercedes-Benz 300SLR RAC TT Moss/Fitch #10 first silver 1955

No photograph of Model issued by Supplier

MXR41302-013 Mercedes-Benz 300SLR GP Sweden Fangio #1 winner silver 1955

Merit 1:24 Scale Racing Car Kits

By Aldo Zana

All text, photographs and models by, and copyright of, Aldo Zana.
Reprinted with permission of VeloceToday.com on-line magazine
.

When the editor of Veloce Today was collecting Merit kits in the late
1950s, he could not have known that another writer-to-be was doing
exactly the same thing, at the same time, but in faraway Italy. His
Italian counterpart, Aldo Zana tells us all about these British models.

The whole range of the Merit 1:24-scale plastic kits assembled and painted in period liveries: mid-Fifties. Front line: British F1 and the Jaguar D-Type. Mid row: Italian F1 and Grand Prix racers and the Lotus 11. Rear row: French racers, Mercedes W196, Cooper 500 MkIX and Aston Martin DB3S.

It was hard times in the second half of the Fifties for European kids in love with Formula One and longing to become part of its world by collecting and playing with model racers. We Italians faced especially limited choices: the hard-to-find die-cast Nigam, the elusive Zax, or the old Mercury racers of the Forties: oddly scaled, with questionable faithfulness and tires fit for an all-terrain army truck. The rise of globalisation brought from the UK to the best Italian toy shops the die-cast Dinky Toys and the first Corgi Toys. The former listed obsolete F1/F2 single seaters of the early Fifties in its catalogue. Corgi featured more updated models of British production: however, merely two, already non-competitive in real life against our all-conquering Ferraris and Maseratis after Mercedes-Benz’ withdrawal in 1955. And they looked too small alongside the Dinkies and Mercuries. And then, out of the blue, cameMerit, although quite difficult to locate among the contemporary fast-growing and highly visible offerings of plastic (polystyrene) kits dominated by the leading US brands of Monogram, Revell, and Aurora.

Italian racers of the Forties and Fifties. From the left: Maserati 250F, Maserati 4CLT/48, Lancia Ferrari, Alfa Romeo 158.

In 1957 Merit produced precise 1:24 scale models of current Formula One protagonists: Lancia-Ferrari V8, Maserati 250F, Gordini T-16, as well as milestones of the pre-1952 F1 seasons: Alfa Romeo 158, Talbot-Lago T26, Maserati 4CLT/48 San Remo”. And thanks to a flurry of new offers in a few months’ span, we could also buy and build the emerging British single-seaters striving for the limelight after a decade of playing second fiddle to the Italians in the form of the Connaught B-Type “Syracuse” 1956, BRM P25 1956, and the Vanwall VW4 1956.

It became easier for Italian kids to become loyal to Merit’s growing offer of racing cars. The company enlarged its range with three sports car icons, all made in the UK: the well-known multiple winner
Jaguar D-Type, the lesser known Aston Martin DB3S and the as yet unknown Lotus Mk XI, a name on the verge of becoming a leader.

All British: the three sports cars in the series. From the left: Aston Martin DB3S, Lotus 11, and Jaguar D in Ecurie Ecosse livery.

The Merit kits came from a company called J & L Randall Ltd., based in the town of Potters Bar, Hertfordshire, north of London. They were all sold in a standard, nondescript box, the same for every model: small and unappealing at a time when competing US brands already showcased their products on box-lids with colourful and attractive art to win the prime spots in shop windows . The only way to select the right Merit kit was a small label glued on one of the narrower sides.

The Alfa Romeo 158 with the standard box in the background. The box was the same for every kit.

They were quite expensive for the period, too: 1,100 Liras, when
the average monthly salary of a worker was about 45,000 Liras.
By comparison, a Mercury die-cast model racer cost 180 Liras and a Dinky 230-250 Liras.

The kits were moulded in flawless plastic; the surface was so clean and regular that it was possible to skip painting the body. It wasn’t a simple task for a kid to smoothly hand brush the Humbrol enamels; airbrushes for modellers were still a long way into the future. The solvent used at that time by Humbrol allowed, nevertheless, a clean and uniform finish even when working with the brush.

The instruction sheet of the 4CLT/48 Maserati. The front side tells in short the history and the races of the real car, the back side presents a clear illustration of the easy assembly procedure.

Assembly was quite straightforward too: the body was split in two halves, top and bottom. Axles and driver seat had to be glued to the bottom half, other details (exhaust pipes, windscreen, dashboard, steering wheel) to the top section, before joining these two sub-assemblies. Each wheel/tire was moulded in two halves and the tire had to be carefully painted matte black. The spokes were a decal (transfer, in British parlance) to be applied on a little transparent celluloid disc, subsequently set onto the outside of the wheel prior to gluing the hub cap. The quality of the decals was only fair and I preferred to avoid them.

The racing number decals were usually quite hard and dry, prone to
cracking. Yet, it was possible to soften them using highly diluted vinyl glue, given the lack of softening liquids on the market. The instruction sheet had a pedantic list of building steps on the front, ending with the painting scheme, but a clear assembly drawing on the back. More interesting was, at the top of the first page, a short presentation of the real car, a summary of its main successes as well as a basic description of its technical characteristics and performance.

Talbot-Lago T26, 1949, one of the two “super” kits featuring engine detail. The body was left unpainted. Note the smoothness of the plastic injection.

Two kits were super-detailed to include the engine and a removable engine bay cover: the 1950 Alfa Romeo 158 and the 1949 Talbot-Lago T-26 4.5 litre. Both were probably made so detailed because the moulds were already available when pressure to launch new models forced the company to simplify and shorten the production cycle.

The whole range of 1956 F1 and Sports cars went on sale in 1957,
a remarkably short time to market: Lancia-Ferrari, Maserati 250F,
BRM P25, Connaught B-Type “Syracuse”, Gordini T16, Vanwall VW4. A very British choice was the addition of the Cooper 500 Mk IX, 1956.

A tribute to the former German dominance was the kit of the Mercedes-Benz W196, the 1954 road-racing version mistakenly presented as the 1955 model. The Maserati 4CLT/48 was another obsolete racer in the series. The kit didn’t have the inner details of the Alfa Romeo and the Talbot-Lago. It was an unusual selection of a car that wasn’t a winner, yet it was well-known being driven by Thailand’s Prince Bira and Brit Reg Parnell.

A real piece of history outside F1 and sports cars, the Cooper 500 Mk IX, 1956, recalls a glorious period of British racing. Body unpainted.

A final touch of class was the colour of the ink used for the instruction sheets: dark red for the Italians, British Racing Green for the British, blue for the French. The Mercedes sheet fell outside the paradigm, printed in dark blue as the historically correct white or silver would have been impossible to read.

The boxes of the later kits contained a small multi-page
educational leaflet on Motor Racing, a more detailed description of the prototype, and a promotional bottom line advertising the brand of motor oil used in races by the car. The leaflet on the Vanwall doubled to eight pages and ended with a tribute to Tony Vanderwell who “raised the prestige of British Automobile Engineering throughout the world”.

The four-page leaflet in the Jaguar D-Type box. A good recap of the car’s history. Britain still ruled. And the following year it also became true in F1.
Below, all fourteen of the Merit models in individual photos. You won’t see this often!
Vanwall VW4, 1956, when the Brits knocked at the forefront of F1. Decals are original.
1956 Lancia Ferrari. The Merit kits was on sale early 1957, a remarkably short time-to-market.
Gordini six-cylinder F2, 1952. Humbrol paint (“Enamel” on the original British tin) to cover the body.
Alfa Romeo 158 with engine cover removed to show the inner details. The other “super” kit together with the Talbot-Lago
Alfa Romeo 158, 1950, hood in place.
Talbot-Lago T26, 1949. A good representation of the engine.
Mercedes W 196, 1954, open wheel version. Decals are original including the chequered cover of the driver’s seat
The diminutive Cooper Mk IX, 1956. The silver exhaust was easier to paint.
Maserati 4CLT/48 in Argentinian livery, as raced by Fangio in Europe.
Aston Martin DB3S, 1956. The yellow trim is an addition of the kit builder.
Connaught B-Type “Syracuse”, 1956. Quite a rare bird in real and scale model worlds.
Lotus 11, 1956. Airbrush repainted after 60 years when the plastic suffered signs of shrinking.
Jaguar D-Type, 1954. The gap at the rear end of the front section of the body is due to having modified the part to make it tilting forward like the real thing.
Maserati 250F, 1956 version.
BRM P25, 1956. To use the brush for the semi-metallic finish was quite a brave endeavour over- sixty years ago.

Wossat? Plastic Models

By Maz Woolley

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

I recently acquired some plastic models. All approximately three inches (7.5cm) in length. The upper portion is moulded in a soft plastic whilst the lower section is in a harder grey plastic. The upper part has four small lugs moulded in that fit through holes in the chassis and the lug is then moulded into a cap to retain it. The wheels are plastic mouldings and they attach to four lugs extending out of the chassis which are again moulded into a cap shape to retain them. The name of the vehicle is moulded into the base, in some cases it is part of the mould and in others the lettering has been pressed in by a hot tool. There is no manufacturer’s markings of any kind that I can see.

I have no idea who made these toys and having exhausted my reference works I am asking you, our readers, to identify the maker and tell me when they were made, and where if you can!

Sunbeam Alpine

Rather a caricature here with the front end being pretty inaccurate it obviously represents and earlier series Alpine with the larger rear fins and split window top. The Series One Alpine was made from 1959 to 1960.


Bristol 406

Again not very accurate as a model, lacking the characteristic front air intake. And sadly it has lost the ends of the front bumper as well. But apart from Spot On who else made a Bristol model.? The 406 was introduced in 1958.


MGA 1600

May 1959 the MGA 1600 was introduced to replace the previous 1500cc version. Here there has been a little more effort at capturing features of the real car with quite a good representation of the MGA Grille moulded in. The wrap around rear screen of the coupe is also included although being unglazed it looks a little strange.


Jaguar XK150

Recognisably an XK 150 Coupe even with the hugely over high side windows. Another vehicle introduced in the late 1950s, 1957 to be precise. Like the MG there is some detail captured such as the 150s chrome strip to the number plate area on the boot and a moulded in Jaguar radiator on the front.

I am sure someone must know who made these. I suspect they would have been produced at the start of the 1960s reflecting vehicles current when the model maker made the master for the moulds. They look too large and finished for cereal premiums and rather smaller than many of the cheap plastic models of the time. Were they sold as a set or with some other model? I will be fascinated to hear from readers.


Oxford Diecast Jaguar Mark V DHC

By Maz Woolley

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

I am a little late to look at this model which is one of Oxford Diecast‘s releases to 1:43 scale from 2018. The Jaguar Mark V Drop Head Coupe (DHC) is available with top up and top down, here we show the top down release in opalescent silver. The top up versions are available in dark blue and British racing green. It follows Oxford’s excellent 1:43 scale SS Jaguar. Like the SS Jaguar I expect that a version of this model will appear in the 1:76 scale range eventually.

Photograph copyright of HIstoric Auctioneers recognised.

The Mark V was produced from 1948 to 1951 replacing the 2.5 and 3.5 litre saloons and inheriting their six cylinder pushrod engines based upon pre-war Standard units.  It was available as a four door saloon and a two door convertible known as the Drop Head Coupé, both versions being full five seaters.  It was a transitional model and introduced engineering developments that would take Jaguar from being a small specialist car firm to a major player in the luxury and sports car market by the end of the 1950s. For the first time a Jaguar was fitted with independent front suspension, hydraulic brakes, and was specifically designed to be produced in both right and left hand drive. Also introduced were the classic wheels fitted with smaller 16″ tires, sealed headlamps and flashing turn signals for the important American market. It was the last car whose styling was influenced by the classic SS Jaguar lines developed by William Lyons before the Second World War. It was replaced by the more streamlined  Mark VII whose style was developed from that introduced with the the XK120 and which took the large Jaguars forward during the 1950s and which not only featured integrated wings and mudguards but also the classic XK engine .

The car modelled by Oxford Diecast was featured at auction in 2014. It was built on the 1st of December 1950 and first registered on the 3rd of February 1951  by the Northampton licensing office. The model looks very true to the original car in colour and finish with the wheels accurately reflecting the Ace wheel trims, painted rims, and Jaguar details on the wheel centre.

I am glad to say that this model reaches the same standards that their excellent Rolls-Royce models have in this scale. The metallic flake in the opalescent paint finish is quite fine and the overall paint finish is very good indeed.

The hood irons looked too large to me until I looked at the original car and saw that Oxford has got them quite right they are huge on the real car too. The crumpled effect of the folded hood has been well realised though the plastic is perhaps a little too reflective.

Door handles are moulded in and painted silver. They are so small on this car that separate items would have possibly looked over scale so I am perfectly happy with the moulded in ones.

The interior is well modelled too with nice wood effect dash and door cappings. The leather seats and door trimming is nicely matt and matches the colour of the real car. Even the nice matt floor is the light grey of the original car’s carpet.

One criticism is that the dash board has been rather simplified with the secondary dials and radio not shown.

The grille, bumper and lights are excellently moulded and finished and the number plates are excellent. The light lenses are first class with a representation of the bulb moulded in and the chrome light rims are delicately modelled.

A leaper is fitted and is quite finely modelled and does not look over scale. This was actually an optional accessory on the original car and the car this model is based on is fitted with one.

There is a small gap round the main lights faired in pods, which are separate plastic items, but it is scarcely noticed at normal viewing distances so it is no real issue.

The rear lights are part of the rear bumper assembly and are painted over silver background which is an effective solution. A neat boot handle is good.

After a run of disappointments with some recent Oxford Diecast models this model reminds me how good they are when they get it right.


Other versions of the Mark V available include an Atlas Jaguar Collection model, made by Ixo, of the DHC with top up as shown in the photograph below.

Neo produce a Mark V Saloon as shown below, a vehicle that is also available as a 1:43 unglazed pewter model by Danbury Mint also shown below.

Neo Jaguar Mark V Saloon – Photograph from Neo Models
Picture copyright rights of eBay vendor recognised.

Brumm Automodelli – 100% made in Italy

By Jerry J. Broz with Rio Tattarletti

Text by and copyright of Authors.
Photographs provided by the Brumm Automodelli snc.

Located in one of the beautiful parts of Italy, near Lake Como, is one of the Italy’s oldest, family-owned manufacturer of 1:43 scale collectable die-cast metal model cars, Brumm Automodelli snc.

The name Brumm comes from the term Brumista a Lombard dialect term for a “cabbie” that was adopted by horse-drawn carriage cab drivers from Milan who named the carriages Brumm de Milan.

In 1952, after the end of the Second World War, Reno, one of the three sons of Giuseppe and Aide Tattarletti, founded the Fratelli Tattarletti company. Then in 1961, he founded Stampoplastica to produce dies for a well known electric model train manufacturer Rivarossi and the famous manufacturer of scale model cars Dugu Miniautotoys, as well as for a variety of products and equipment produced by other companies. This led to the founding of RIO Models in 1962 which produced its own line of 1:43 scale model cars.

In the following ten years, from 1962 to 1972, Reno Tattarletti and his  brothers Nilo and Diego operated Rio and Stampoplastica companies. In 1972, Reno left Rio to his brothers (who continued to produce 1:43 scale model cars) and left Stampoplastica to his best employees, Molteni and Bianchi.  From 1972 to 1975, Molteni & Bianchi produced tooling for other companies and were primary suppliers to Rio. At the same time they started to develop the coach collection for themselves.

During this time, Reno devoted his time to collecting real cars and constructing a museum-like building in which to showcase and store his collection of various cars. Some tooling machines were also moved into the building with the collection. Molteni & Bianchi eventually partnered with Reno Tattarletti and formed the Brumm Automodelli snc.

For Reno Tattarletti, and Brumm’s co-founders Virginio Bianchi and Emilio Molteni, the carriages were memories of their youth. Because of this, the Brumm and Historical series, dedicated to Carriages and Horse-drawn Carriages, were the first of Brumm’s series. These were soon followed by Old Fire series. All three initial series were produced in plastic. The subsequent Revival series, which came after the Carriages and Horse-drawn Carriages series was the first produced in metal.

Throughout the evolution of Brumm, additional products have been added, and are divided into seven major groups: Newsletters (listing the dates and numbers), News (listing all the news of the years – from 2012 to 2018), Series (grouping of the models), Brand (marques of the car modelled), Category (list of models’ functions), Street (list of model types), and Racing (list of racing types). Each group features historic, vintage,classic, production, sports and racing cars and car related items.

Special cars, collections, drivers and events are instantly accessible
through the following lists:  Ferrari, Porsche 917, GTO Collection,
Gilles Villeneuve, Fiat 500, Formula 1, World Champions, Le Mans,
Lupin, Transporters, Carousel, Monza, and Drivers.

Eventually the current owner of Brumm, Rio Tattarletti (son of the Brumm founder Reno), and co-owners, Emilio Molteni and Virginio Bianchi, mainly focused on producing 1:43 scale die-cast metal models of Italian racing, sports and street cars. Later on, the model library was expanded to include similar styles of 1:43 scale die-cast metal models from Germany, Britain, France, and other countries. Some of the cars were made in several different liveries.

Today, Brumm primarily produces new models and a few older die-cast models of 1:43 scale Formula One Ferrari and other F1 and Sports racing cars.  Additionally, they produce an assortment of out-of-production racing cars and other vintage, classic, sports and street models of collectable, die-cast metal model cars. One special type of model they make are “damaged replicas” of Formula One models which accurately recreate damaged bodywork and deflated

tires and which form part of the Autostory Collection. This also includes diorama sets and figures such as drivers with and without umbrellas, as well as spare tires and wheels, spare wings, mechanics, garage equipment and tools. There are even paddock girls and pit stop mechanics with and without umbrellas, various spectators. These all help us recreate “Great Moments of Motorsport” like:

  • Villeneuve’s spectacular accidents
  • The domination of Porsche at Le Mans
  • The 1955 Mille Miglia Mercedes 300SLR
  • The 1951 British Grand Prix Ferrari 375
  • The famous 1981 duel between the Ferrari 126CK Turbo and the F 104 Starfighter

Race Transporter Sets come with trucks and cars and are made with the cooperation of another small Italian company “Old Cars” improving and updating  some of their transporter products. For example, the set of Transporter 642RN includes three Ferrari
156 cars, 2 drivers, 2 mechanics, and 2 sets of tires.

A new product line, called the “Commercial Series” which included a “Carousel“, was added featuring models of Fiat 500, 600, 600 Multipla, and Fiat 1100 in different promotional liveries. This includes Campari Rum, Coca-Cola, Pasta Buitoni, Macchine Singer, Galbani, and others. The models were also presented in nationalist themed sets such as a Porsche Speedster with Eva Peron markings, a Fiat 500 for the Pope Habemus Papam Francesco, and others.

Production for the promotional market is growing and Brumm is becoming more and more involved in that market. Every promotional model made is unique and unrepeatable. The production of a promotional model, including development of the packaging, must be done quickly and meet the buyer’s specifications, timing and budget.

The “Anniversaries Series” as well as the 50th Anniversary Series
spanning 1968-2018 have been added to Brumm’s output. These editions were limited to 100 pieces each and presented in commemorative box sets. One of the first of these editions celebrated the 50th anniversary of the historic
band, Pooh.Another to appear is a replica of the legendary “Fiat 600 Multipla” car which appeared in the 1981 video of Chi Fermera la Musica” (“Who will Stop the Music“).

Another release from Brumm celebrated Jim Clark 50th Anniversary 1968-2018. This featured the two time Formula One World Champion and his Lotus 25 race car. And let’s not forget the 50th Anniversary of Ed. Lupin, the famous Japanese gentleman thief.

Brumm recently introduced models of the “Little Boy” and “Fat Man” atomic bombs dropped by U.S. on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, respectively, at the end of the Second World War.  Each bomb was presented in a display inscribed with the date, time of detonation, and location. Although well accepted by collectors, Brumm was criticised for making the models of the atomic bombs, even though these are part of world history and the atomic age.

Occasionally, Brumm produce items unrelated to model cars like the Happy Easter 2016 Greeting Card with a picture of Chocolate model car, a true, full scale driving simulator, for visitors of the Brumm stand at Hobby Model Expo 2014, and the 2017 Fiat 500 Babbazza Merry Christmas diorama.

The “Fairs and Events Series” highlights Brumm’s participation in the Hobby Model Expo in Milano, the International Nuremberg Toy Fair in Nuremberg, the Model Expo in Verona, and the 35th and 45th anniversary of Brumm itself. In previous years Toy Fair models were also sold to customers in shops as well as used as promotional items at the Fairs themselves.

The beautiful Brumm exhibits at various Expos and Fairs attract Brumm model car enthusiasts and curious visitors. The series
also lists and highlights photographs of participation at the various events. Brumm exhibits at a wide range of shows and collectors meetings such as Miss Brumm 2007. Some displays have been very special such as the unforgettable Brumm exhibit/stand at the 2009
Nuremberg Toy Fair. The “Fairs and Events Series highlights many of the other Brumm activities besides their model cars.

Continuing the long family tradition, 100% of everything in Brumm’s factory is made in Italy, thus the promotion line “Brumm Automodelli -100% made in Italy” / “Brumm Automodelli – Prodotto Italiano Al 100%“. This makes the Brumm models different from all other Italian die-cast model car companies whose products are not entirely made in Italy. Brumm’s lines differ from other companies through their long life, the fact they are made entirely in Italy and the wide range of models offered. The company remains a private business and is still producing models today when many competitors have closed or have been swallowed up by international companies producing elsewhere.

During the last two years, the Brumm Factory has organised at least five tours each year dedicated to collectors and car enthusiasts.  This year the owners of Ferrari model cars were treated to a special event during which they had access to real Ferrari cars and their owners.

Brumm’s die-cast, metal model cars and accessories are made in 1:43 scale using state-of-the-art computerised equipment to digitise photographs and measure actual cars in order to produce the tooling and steel dies needed for plastic components and metal casting. The models and accessories are hand spray-painted, oven dried, tampo printed,and decaled (numbering, striping, national colours as needed for a driver or race). They are detailed with photo-etched parts.  After assembly, each model is inspected (road tested) before being packaged and sent to dealers around the world. The historically accurate models are available at an affordable price and are very popular with collectors world-wide. Note Brumm models are not toys and are recommended for ages 14 and up.

In 2018, Brumm manufactured and delivered 120 different items, (30 new, 2 promotionals, 62 re-runs, and 26 updated models). The complete catalogue has an assortment of 595 different model cars and accessories available exclusively in 1:43 scale. The current status of those 595 models is: one not available, 390 out of
production, and 102 available to pre-order).

The wide availability of Brumm models and accessories is a great reason to start an enviable 1:43 scale collection.  To see what is available view the Brumm website (www.brumm.it) and request the General Catalog, Year-book or the current Qui Brumm Catalog (announcing the new models). The Brumm Store newsletter can be subscribed to from the right hand bar on their website. Collectors may also follow Brumm on Facebook, Twitter, Youtube,
Google, Pinterest, Instagram as well.

Collectors are highly recommended Danilo Castellarian’s “Brumm Librumm 1972/2002 a story of models“. This is very well written and illustrated and consists of 64 pages of the Brumm Modelli Company evolution and 180 pictures of Brumm history, production facilities, catalogues and products. The book is available in English,Italian, French and German.

Also available are Brumm Newsletter #078 / November News 2018 and the Qui brumm 2018 News Catalogue featuring all news, updates and promotional materials of the current year. The Qui brumm 2018 (updated catalogue with all the 2018 news) is available in hard copy or digital format.

E N C O R E !

                          2019  PREVIEW:  Ferrari 312 T4 “snowplow”.

Brumm has chosen the Ferrari 313 T4 Grand Prix car to introduce the first Brumm 1:43 scale model with steering front wheels.
Currently, this is the only model car on the 1:43 scale die-cast model market with steerable front wheels. About 10 years ago, “Quartzo”, a brand name used by Sun Star company, made the 1:43 scale model of Renault F1 R330B N 15 with steerable front wheels.


News from the Continent January 2019 – Norev

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

All text by, and copyright of the Author. All photographs provided by the Manufacturer.

In this article I look at the last two Norev releases from 2018. These models are produced in China for France and are diecast unless otherwise noted. 

November 2018 Releases
1:12 Scale

127500 Porsche 917K

Le Mans 24 Hours 1970 – Driven by Siffert and Redman and suffered an engine failure after 12 hours. The picture from Norev is marked to show clearly how large the model is at this scale.


127501 Porsche 917K

Winner of the Le Mans 24 hour race 1970 – Driven by Attwood and Herrmann.


1:18 Scale

185300 Alpine Renault A110 1600S 1971 – blue


183303 Alpine Renault A110 1600S 1971 . white with red striping


185301 Alpine Renault A110 1600S 1971 – Gendarmerie


183268 BMW M535i Saloon 1980 – gold metallic


183593 Mercedes-Benz S600 saoon 1997 – green metallic


183497 Mercedes-AMG GT S 2018 – black metallic


184833 Peugeot 404 saloon 1965 – Antique green


Scale 1:43

153051 Citroen Light 15 saloon 1949 – Dark blue and Cream


158218 Citroen GS 1220 Club 1973 – Tholonet beige metallic


154205 Citroen Xantia 1993 – Mauritius blue


475447 Peugeot 504 Pick-up with canvas cover – clear blue


511317 Renault Duster Oroch 2015 – white


517728 Renault Megane R.S. 2018 – Platinum silver


517732 Renault Scenic 2016 – Cassiopee grey and black


518399 Renault Alaskan Pick-up 2017 – silver


574055 Simca Vedette Marly 1957 – Pale yellow and black


840029 VW Touran 2015 – white


518393 Renault Alaskan Pick-up 2017 – “Fire Brigade”


Norev Classics 1:43 scale

CL2711 Ford Thunderbird 1960 – adriatic green


CL2712 Ford Thunderbird 1960 – aquamarine


1:87 scale

517818 Alpine A310 1977 – Alpine blue


574116 Matra-Simca Bagheera 1975 – Sun yellow


451731 Panhard PL 17 saloon 1961 – Atlantide blue


518582 Renault Galion 1963 Brewery La Meuse with bottle crates


518583 Renault Galion 1963 Brewery Jean Renard with barrels


530262 IVECO Bus Crossway LE 2014 “Car du Rhone”


530263 IVECO Bus Urbanway 2014 “TCL”


December 2018 Releases

1:18 Scale

183224 BMW M1 1980 – blue


181592 Citroen DS 21 Break 1970 – Bordeaux


183400 Mercedes-Benz 190SL 1955 – blue


183567 Mercedes-Benz 300 CE Cabriolet 1990 – Bornite metallic


185169 Renault Dauphine 1958 – Medicis black


1:43 Scale

517863 Alpine A110 2017 – white and blue test version


830074 Audi 200 Quattro 1989 – white


270321 Bentley Continental GT coupe 2018 – silver


270061 Jaguar E-Type Coupe 1964 – grey


351305 Mercedes-Benz CLS-Class 2018 – ruby red metallic


351175 Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 2018 – silver


475825 Peugeot 508 SW GT 2018 – Amazonite grey


475626 Peugeot 508 SW GT 2018 – Pearl white


517791 Renault Megane Estate 2016 – Glacier white


517799 Renault Megane Estate 2016 – red


517963 Renault Symbioz Salon of Francoforte 2017


517962 Renault R.S. 2017 Vision Salon of ShangHai 2017


840096 Volkswagen Corrado G80 1990 – silver


517796 Renault Megane Estate 2016 “Douanes – Customs”


517798 Renault Megane Estate 2016 “Douanes – Customs” – red and yellow stripes

517794 Renault Megane Estate 2016 – “Police Municipale”


517795 Renault Megane Estate 2016 – “Police Municipale Intercommunale”


MINIJET Scale 1:64

310908 Peugeot 508 SW 2018 – white


310904 Renault Symbioz 2017 – copper


310905 Renault R.S. 2017 – black and gold


Making a Jaguar XF Sportbreak

By John F. Quilter

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

Picture copyright of Car Magazine

A few years ago Jaguar launched the estate version of the midsize XF saloon which was introduced around 2010. One of my model vendors had Whitebox 1:43 scale models of the XFR at a bargain price and combined with that, and the fact I did not have a model of the Sportbreak, Jaguar’s name for their estate, I decided to make one myself. Currently no model maker does a Sportbreak so my Jaguar collection was lacking.

The process, which replicates to some extent things I have done before, entailed first, a complete disassembly and strip down of the red Whitebox XFR. Off came the base plate, interior, lights and in this case even the door handles which are not cast into the model. Then out came the jeweler’s saw to cut off the rear quarter of the top and the boot lid area.

I was in luck on this model as Jaguar’s massive sales brochure had outstanding photos of both the saloon and the estate as 90 degree side shots, 90 degree front and rear shots. These, and photos found on Google are invaluable in getting the shape and details correct. The rear portion of the diecast roof which was not cut off was gently bent upwards to replicate the angle of the estate roof. Then using sheet aluminum an extension of the roof was created and new side window frames from the B pillar back were cut out and shaped.

Since the Sportbreak has a large glass roof I filled in the existing smaller sunroof opening. To create the glass roof effect I simply painted this in gloss black as these roof panels are heavily tinted for sun protection.

A spoiler, (or is it a rear mounted sun visor?) was made from a section of aluminum sheet. I noted that the Sportbreak is from the “facelift” XF so that meant that some details had to be changed, minor shape differences to the tail lamps, relocation of the exhaust pipes, the shape of the front valance side vents and the vent below the central grill. The vents on the bonnet had to be eliminated and the front wing vents reshaped. Side window glazing was some clear plastic from a food container and since this was flat, presented no special issues. The rounded rear tailgate window was also a piece of repurposed food container with a suitable curvature.

My spare parts inventory contained a black rear window wiper that fit well. Photos from the sales brochure showed an interior and seats in two tone black and grey so the stock Whitebox all black interior was enhanced with some grey panels to the seats.

Final paint was with a “rattle can” of Krylon white, finished a few days later with a clear coat of Testors Model Master clear gloss enamel. This is a new technique to me and it does give a superior finish almost to the extent of a factory built model. One must remember that the gloss enamel takes a number of days to fully dry so one must resist the temptation to start handling the model for a number of days after painting.

So this Sportbreak represents the second production Jaguar estate, the first being the X Type which was done in 1:43 scale by Premium X. It appears that now many of the current Jaguar and Land Rover models are being done by TSM, (True Scale Models) who I’m told are a client of Premium Collectibles Trading (Editor: the group which produces Ixo and Premium X brands as well as making models under contract for many others like DeAgostini and White Box). In 1:43 scale they currently make the two crossover Jaguars the F Pace, and E Pace, as well as the electric I Pace. Time will tell if they launch a Sportbreak making my effort redundant.


A look around in November 2018

By Maz Woolley

All text by, and copyright of, the Author. Photographs provided by manufacturers and wholesalers.

There is a huge range of models being released in the final quarter of this year. This article looks at models from a wide range of manufacturers that we do not often review.

Bburago and Maisto

Both brands from the same maker. Well known for budget models and often selling in toy shops and stores which offer few other model vehicles. The models are often in larger scales but 1:43 models also feature.

B18-11040 1:18 Bugatti Chiron


Bburago Triumph Bobber 1:18


M31409 1:10 Honda Repsol 2017 Marc Marquez #93

Ready painted assembly kits 1:24 ferarri FXX-X


M39124 1:24 Build your own Lamborghini Aventador LP700-4

B18-31456 Mercedes Benz car transporter with 1 x 1:43 die cast car

B18-30393 1:43 Suburu WRX STI 2017 sold from trade pack

 

CMC

 

CMC models are famed for being both expensive and beautifully modelled. Here we see a group of Ferrari racing cars built to their usual very high standards. All the models date back to the classic 1950s racing scene.

CMC M183 Ferrari D50, 1956, GP Italy (Monza) #26 Collins/Fangio


CMC M184 Ferrari D50 yellow GP Belgium #20 Pilette and Lancia D50 #6 Ascari


CMC M185 Ferrari D50,1956 long nose, GP Germany #2 Collins

Ixo

Many of the Atlas Jaguar models have yet to be seen under the Ixo brand. Here we have the Mark Ten which appeared in the Atlas series with a rather ‘tip-toes’ appearance in maroon. Here we see it in a pale blue with slightly more detailed wheels. It still has Jaguar on the number plates rather than realistic ones.

 

IXO CLC291 Jaguar MK 10, metallic-light blue, 1961

Almost Real

They are makers of detailed 1:18 scale resin models, many sold in as promotionals by the manufacturers. This is a model of one of the last Defenders made.

ALM 810307 Land Rover Defender 110 Heritage Collection Green

Road Kings

Following the Scania recently looked at in MAR Online  there is now a new model. Again this is a classic tractor unit, this time from Mercedes-Benz. Again it looks a large and impressive diecast model.

Mercedes LPS 1632 1969 blue/red/black 1:18

Tecnomodel

These resin kits are very detailed resin models mostly to 1:18 scale and are made in Italy.

TEC 18111C Lotus Evora 410 met green 2017

These models are made in small batches. Batches are also to be made in yellow, silver and black


TEC 1897A Bizzarrini P538 Le Mans 1966 #10

Driven by Edgar Berney and Andre Wicky. The same mould has been used to produce two press versions in red and blue. There is also to be a blue Can-Am version.

CMR (Classic Model Replicars)

CMR make diecast models in China. They make a wide range of classic racing models. Most models are in 1:18 scale.

CMR 045 Porsche 917 LH #18 24h LeMans 1971 Rodriguez, Oliver


CMR 070 Ferrari 340 Berlinetta Mexico #20

3rd placed in the Carrera Panamericana  in 1952 driven by Chinetti and Lucas


CMR 111 Shelby Cobra Daytona coupe #12 24h LeMans 1965

Driven by Schlesser and Grant


CMR 112 Shelby Cobra Daytona #59 24h LeMans 1965

Driven by Harper and Sutcliffe


CMR 113 Aston Martin DBR1 #5 Winner 24h LeMans 1959

Driven by Shelby and Salvadori

CMR 12006 Ferrari 330 P4 #21 2nd 24h LeMans 1967 1:12 Scale

Driven by Scarfiotti, Parkes

BoS (Best of Show)

Best of Show is a brand produced for ModelCarGroup in Germany. The models are made in resin in China. Initially BoS models were made in 1:43 and 1:18 scale at a lower standard than the premium brands MCG own like Neo. After they stopped making 1:87 scale Neo models they introduced a slightly less detailed range of resin 1:87 scale models under the BoS brand. Here we see two of the Renault cars available which feature good wheels and detailing.

Renault 18, rot, 1978


Renault Fuego, metallic-dunkelbeige, 1980

CMF

Another MCG brand made in China from resin to 1:18 scale. These are detailed models and considerably dearer than their MCG diecast 1:18 scale range.   Following the fashion to model the immediately pre-war German streamliners that is popular with many ranges this year.

Maybach DS8 Stromlinien-Cabriolet Spohn, light grey and black  1934


Maybach SW35 Stromlinie Spohn, black and beige 1935


 

New models – 2018 Jaguar I Pace and E Pace

By John F. Quilter

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

Jaguar is finally following the lead of Mercedes-Benz, BMW, and others in Europe of making available a range of their cars, both past and very current, in my favourite international collecting scale of 1:43. These are, at least in the UK, available from the official Jaguar UK website, https://shop.jaguar.com/uk/model-cars. The US Jaguar website does not have as large a range and it seems to lag what is offered on the UK site. I’ve been told by at least one dealer parts manager, and have prior experience, that scale models are a popular item in dealership lifestyle accessory boutiques. Unfortunately, US models collectors cannot order from the UK site but enterprising 1:1 car retailers have made some of these models available on eBay. So for die-hard collectors there is a way to obtain them which is what I did buying from Guy Salmon Jaguar in Bristol.

The two newest Jaguar products, the cutting edge all-electric I Pace, and the compact crossover vehicle, the E Pace are now available in multiple colours in 1:43 scale. The I Pace is in Photon Red or Corris Grey and the E Pace in Yulong White or Caldera Red, all official Jaguar colours. These items come on a black plinth covered by the usual clear Perspex box and the black card stock sleeve is surrounded in a clear plastic outer covering. This elegant packaging is marked “Jaguar” making these official promotional items. In the USA promotional models of cars dates back to the early 1950s when AMT and Johan produced a continuous series of 1:24 scale plastic models of each US automaker’s latest car. They were accurately done in proper colours with glazing and interiors, but unfortunately they were made of a type of plastic that tended to warp severely with age greatly disappointing avid long term collectors. By the early 60s this issue had been dealt with and later items are more durable.

The Europeans tended to be inclined to do promotional items in the more compact 1:43 scale though larger scale items are available on the Jaguar and Land Rover websites. These two items are made by TSM Model in China and judging by their heft are diecast, not resin. TSM, also known as True Scale Models, is a maker of many 1:43 scale models and have apparently landed the contract with Jaguar for these items and perhaps others going forward. TSM’s range of 1:43 items includes Honda, Toyota, Bentley, Aston Martin, Porsche and others. https://www.tsm-models.com/product.php

The I Pace I received from Guy Salmon Jaguar is in Corris Grey, one of 12 colours the prototype car can be ordered in and is left hand drive. Its interior is a single colour light Oyster one of five interior colours Jaguar offers on the 1:1 version according to my US brochure.

This model comes with one of the nine wheel styles offered, the 22 inch Style 5069. The roof is a very large tinted glass panel. The 1:1 car comes in three specification packages, S, SE, and HSE with varying levels of equipment and features. The HSE includes a Driver Assist Package that incorporates Adaptive Cruise Control with Steering Assist, High Speed Emergency Braking, 360 Degree Surround Camera with Blind Spot Assist. Exterior colours on the prototype vehicle include two different whites, two different silvers, two different greys, three different blacks, two reds and a dark blue.

Wheels are the 21 inch split spoke type, one of no less than 10 Jaguar offers for this vehicle which vary from 18 inch to 22 inch. Overall length of the full size I Pace is 184 inches making it a bit bigger than the 173 inch E Pace. The model measures 4.27 inches making it within .05 of an inch of correct 1:43 scale.

Jaguar’s E Pace is the next size down from their first crossover vehicle, the F Pace which is based on the XF saloon (length 195 inches) platform launched in 2007. The E Pace, based on the XE saloon (length 184 inches) is a size smaller and expands the range of crossover vehicles. E Pace, at 173 inches is a relatively compact vehicle.

The E Pace model by TSM is in Yulong white which is one of 10 colours offered on the real Jaguar. Interestingly they are heavy on whites, there are two shades, blacks, two shades, and greys or silvers, three shades. Surprisingly there are no greens in the selections but I am told by a US Jaguar salesman that white, black, and silver are currently the most popular colours. The model is also left hand drive and with an all Ebony interior. The E Pace model measures 4.02 inches making it exactly correct 1:43 scale. It should be noted that TSM also produce a 1:43 scale replica of the F Pace.

On both of these models there is some chassis detail including a chrome exhaust system on the plastic base plate on the E Pace. Obviously no exhaust system on the I Pace. There is a lot of commonality in the styling of these two cars with such things as a glass roof, a uniform Jaguar trapezoidal grill in black, and the visor over the rear window. The I Pace has a “reverse” scoop in the middle of the bonnet which is, according to the brochure, an exit for air entering the grill adding to aerodynamics.

So for those who follow the Jaguar developments and products, these are great models of the vehicles to add to one’s collection and in my case will bring my display of Jaguars from 1932 on up to current. I look forward to others as Jaguar’s range of products continues to expand and develop.


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