Category Archives: Jaguar

New models – 2018 Jaguar I Pace and E Pace

By John F. Quilter

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

Jaguar is finally following the lead of Mercedes-Benz, BMW, and others in Europe of making available a range of their cars, both past and very current, in my favourite international collecting scale of 1:43. These are, at least in the UK, available from the official Jaguar UK website, https://shop.jaguar.com/uk/model-cars. The US Jaguar website does not have as large a range and it seems to lag what is offered on the UK site. I’ve been told by at least one dealer parts manager, and have prior experience, that scale models are a popular item in dealership lifestyle accessory boutiques. Unfortunately, US models collectors cannot order from the UK site but enterprising 1:1 car retailers have made some of these models available on eBay. So for die-hard collectors there is a way to obtain them which is what I did buying from Guy Salmon Jaguar in Bristol.

The two newest Jaguar products, the cutting edge all-electric I Pace, and the compact crossover vehicle, the E Pace are now available in multiple colours in 1:43 scale. The I Pace is in Photon Red or Corris Grey and the E Pace in Yulong White or Caldera Red, all official Jaguar colours. These items come on a black plinth covered by the usual clear Perspex box and the black card stock sleeve is surrounded in a clear plastic outer covering. This elegant packaging is marked “Jaguar” making these official promotional items. In the USA promotional models of cars dates back to the early 1950s when AMT and Johan produced a continuous series of 1:24 scale plastic models of each US automaker’s latest car. They were accurately done in proper colours with glazing and interiors, but unfortunately they were made of a type of plastic that tended to warp severely with age greatly disappointing avid long term collectors. By the early 60s this issue had been dealt with and later items are more durable.

The Europeans tended to be inclined to do promotional items in the more compact 1:43 scale though larger scale items are available on the Jaguar and Land Rover websites. These two items are made by TSM Model in China and judging by their heft are diecast, not resin. TSM, also known as True Scale Models, is a maker of many 1:43 scale models and have apparently landed the contract with Jaguar for these items and perhaps others going forward. TSM’s range of 1:43 items includes Honda, Toyota, Bentley, Aston Martin, Porsche and others. https://www.tsm-models.com/product.php

The I Pace I received from Guy Salmon Jaguar is in Corris Grey, one of 12 colours the prototype car can be ordered in and is left hand drive. Its interior is a single colour light Oyster one of five interior colours Jaguar offers on the 1:1 version according to my US brochure.

This model comes with one of the nine wheel styles offered, the 22 inch Style 5069. The roof is a very large tinted glass panel. The 1:1 car comes in three specification packages, S, SE, and HSE with varying levels of equipment and features. The HSE includes a Driver Assist Package that incorporates Adaptive Cruise Control with Steering Assist, High Speed Emergency Braking, 360 Degree Surround Camera with Blind Spot Assist. Exterior colours on the prototype vehicle include two different whites, two different silvers, two different greys, three different blacks, two reds and a dark blue.

Wheels are the 21 inch split spoke type, one of no less than 10 Jaguar offers for this vehicle which vary from 18 inch to 22 inch. Overall length of the full size I Pace is 184 inches making it a bit bigger than the 173 inch E Pace. The model measures 4.27 inches making it within .05 of an inch of correct 1:43 scale.

Jaguar’s E Pace is the next size down from their first crossover vehicle, the F Pace which is based on the XF saloon (length 195 inches) platform launched in 2007. The E Pace, based on the XE saloon (length 184 inches) is a size smaller and expands the range of crossover vehicles. E Pace, at 173 inches is a relatively compact vehicle.

The E Pace model by TSM is in Yulong white which is one of 10 colours offered on the real Jaguar. Interestingly they are heavy on whites, there are two shades, blacks, two shades, and greys or silvers, three shades. Surprisingly there are no greens in the selections but I am told by a US Jaguar salesman that white, black, and silver are currently the most popular colours. The model is also left hand drive and with an all Ebony interior. The E Pace model measures 4.02 inches making it exactly correct 1:43 scale. It should be noted that TSM also produce a 1:43 scale replica of the F Pace.

On both of these models there is some chassis detail including a chrome exhaust system on the plastic base plate on the E Pace. Obviously no exhaust system on the I Pace. There is a lot of commonality in the styling of these two cars with such things as a glass roof, a uniform Jaguar trapezoidal grill in black, and the visor over the rear window. The I Pace has a “reverse” scoop in the middle of the bonnet which is, according to the brochure, an exit for air entering the grill adding to aerodynamics.

So for those who follow the Jaguar developments and products, these are great models of the vehicles to add to one’s collection and in my case will bring my display of Jaguars from 1932 on up to current. I look forward to others as Jaguar’s range of products continues to expand and develop.


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News from the Continent June/July – Solido

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

All text by, and copyright of the Author. Photographs supplied by the Manufacturer

Solido models are diecast in China for France. Solido is part of the same group of companies as Schuco.

June 2018

1:18 Scale

S1800405 Citroen Acadiane “La Poste”

 

S1800903 Citroen Traction 11 CV

 

S1801106 Porsche 911 Carrera 2.8 RSR

 

S1800802 Subaru Impreza #5 Rally Monte Carlo 1995

 

S1800823 Alpine A110 1800S #1 Tour de Corse 1973

 

S1801501 BMW M3 Sports Evo black 1990

 

S1801502 BMW M3 saloon – red – 1986

 

1:43 Scale Models

 

S4302600 Bugatti T35B 1928 – blue

 

S4302700 Mercedes-Benz 190E saloon – 1984 – silver

 

S4302800 Renault Fuego 1982 – blue

 

S4302900 Simca Rally 2 1974 – yellow

 

S4303000 Jaguar D-Type 1952 – British Racing Green

 

S4303100 FIAT Panda 1990 – red

 

More SOLIDO 1:18

 

S1800305 Citroen Dyane 1974 – blue

 

S1800406 Citroen Acadiane “Michelin”

 

S1800506 Volkswagen Beetle 1303 SCCA Rally

 

S1800804 Porsche 911 SC Group 4 Rally dÁrmor 1979

 

S1801105 Porsche 911 RSR Sunoco 24 h of Daytona

 

S1801402 Fiat 500L 1969 – pink

 

421184670 Citroen 2CV6 “Cochonou”

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News from the Continent June/July/August 2018 – M4 Model Group

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

All text copyright of the Author. Photographs supplied by the Manufacturer.

This article covers releases from June to August by M4 modelcars of Italy. The models are diecast to 1:43 scale in Italy unless otherwise noted. M4 produce three different ranges:Art; Best; and Rio.

June 2018

ART Models

 

ART389 Ferrari 290 MM; Grand Prix of Portugal; Monsanto 1957 –A. de Changy #19 – 4th place

 

ART119/2 Ferrari 250 P – winner of the 12 hours of Sebring 1963 – Surtees/Scarfiotti #30

BEST models

 

BEST9709 Jaguar E-Type Spyder Electric -UK Royal Wedding 2018 – Harry and Meghan – Limited Edition

 

BEST 9710 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 – 24 hours of Daytona 1969 – S. Posey/R. Rodriguez #41

 

BEST9711 Jaguar E-Type Coupe – Rallye Monte Carlo 1965 – Pinder/Pollard #104

 

BEST9712 Ferrari 308 GTS – USA-version 1979 – black

 

BEST9713 Fiat-Abarth 750 “Record Monza SCCA National Cumberland 1959 – Duncan Black #81

RIO

 

RIO4569 Fiat 501 – 1919 – La Saetta del Re – black

RIO4226-E Bugatti 41 Royale Weyman – 1929 – black and yellow

This model has been released previously in a higher cost version with special packaging. This is the release of a slightly simpler version at a considerably lower price point.

RIO4227-E Bugatti 41 Royale Weyman – 1929 – black and red

Like the yellow and black version above this model has been released previously in a higher cost version with special packaging. This is the release of a slightly simpler version at a considerably lower price point.

July 2018

ART Models

 

ART390 Ferrari 860 Monza – 2nd in Grand of Venezuela – Caracas 1956 – Juan Manuel Fangio #602

ART391 Ferrari 250 California LWB; winner of the Nassau Memorial Trophy Race 1959 – Bob Grossman #18

BEST Models

 

BEST9196-2 LOLA T70 Mk III –  Le Mans 24 hours 1968 – J.Epstein/E.Nelson

BEST9714 Ferrari 330 GTS 1967 light blue metallic

BEST9715 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 – Le Mans Test 1968 – Grossman/Berney #15

 

BEST9716 Ferrari 308 GTB Group 4 – winner of Rally Piancavallo 1980 – ”Nico”/Barban #4

RIO Models

 

RIO4570 Fiat 238 hearse

August 2018

ART Models

ART026-2 Ferrari 166 MM Barchetta – Dr. Giovanni Agnelli’s personal car

BEST Models

 

BEST9717 Ferrari 308 GTS – personal car of Gilles Villeneuve

 

BEST9718 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 “Safety Car Goodwood Revival 2013

 

BEST9719 Ferrari 512 BB LM – Silverstone 6 hours Relay 1981 – Salmon/Phillips

 

BEST9720 Porsche 356 B Carrera Abarth GTL – 12 hours of Sebring – Cassel/Sesslar

RIO Models

 

RIO4571 Fiat 1500 6C – Gasogeno 1935

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News from the Continent – M4 Model Car Group March 2018

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

All photographs provided by the manufacturer.

All the models listed below are made in diecast metal to 1:43 scale in Italy unless otherwise stated.

ART Models

ART381 Ferrari 500 TR

Winner SCCA Laguna Seca 1957 – Pete Loylely #125

 

ART382 Ferrari 250 California LWB Spider America 1958 – red

 

ART383 Ferrari 860 Monza

3rd in Mille Miglia 1956 – Luigi Musso #556

 

ART384 Ferrari 625 LM

8th in GP Venezuela 1956 – Pierro Drogo #36

 

ART385 Ferrari 860 Monza

2nd in Mille Miglia 1956 – Collins/Klementaski #551

 

ART386 Ferrari 500 TRC

12 hours of Sebring 1957 – 1st in 2.0 litre class – Hively/Ginter #28

 

BEST Models

BEST9694 Lancia Fulvia F&M Special HF

Test car 1967 (new resin)

 

BEST 9695 Porsche 550 RS

Le Mans 1958 – 5th Godin de Beaufort/Linge #32

 

BEST9696 Jaguar E-Type Spyder

Elton John´s personal car.

 

BEST9697 Simca 1150 Abarth Rally 1963

 

BEST9698 Lancia Fulvia F&M Special HF

9th in Targa Florio 1969 – Munari/Aaltonen (new resin)

 

BEST9699 Ferrari 250 LM Spyder

Test car 1965

 

BEST9700 Ferrari 250 LM Spyder

Pernis von Innsbruck/Tirol 1965 – Heini Walter #2 first in class

 

BEST9701 Porsche 550 RS

2nd in Targa Florio 1959 – Mahle/Strähle/Linge #118

 

BEST9702 Ferrari 330 GTC 1966

light blue metallic

 

BEST9703 Porsche 908/02 Flounder

Interseries Norisring 1970 – Niki Lauda #39

 

Image of car – no model shot available
BEST9704 Abarth 2000 SE

Mont Ventoux 1969 – Arturo Merzario #49 – 2nd – 1st in its class

 

BEST9705 Alfa Romeo TZ2

Pergusa Jolly Hotel Rally 1965 – De Adamich/Lini #148

 

RIO Models

RIO4560 Fiat 238 Tetto Alto

Service Van Lancia Racing 1975-1977

 

RIO4561 Volkswagen Beetle with skis 1953

This is again a very strange looking model. This Beetle has an oval rear window from 1953, but lacks the quarter lights in the doors and has the bumpers of a 1948 car. In between the windscreen wipers  there are air intake slots like those fitted to the Beetle from 1968 onwards. The rear lights are round, in original it were oval to this time. The model has been put together with no regard for accuracy.

 

RIO4562 Fiat 1500 6C

Police 1950

 

RIO4563 Fiat 519

Italian Red Cross 1932

 

RIO4564 Fiat 128 Rally 1971

Green

 

RIO4565 Volkswagen Beetle 1200 De Luxe 1953

Bordeaux red

Once again a very strange looking model and unauthentic. Oval rear window from 1953, but no quarter lights fitted at that time.bumpers of a 1948 car. In between the windscreen wipers  there are air intake slots like those fitted to the Beetle from 1968 onwards. The rear lights are round, in original it were oval to this time. The model has again been put together with no regard for accuracy.

 

RIO4566 Fiat 18 BL truck 1918

Italian Army


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An Amateur Builder #1 – Western Models 1936 SS Tourer

By David Holcombe

All text and photographs by, and copyright of the Author unless otherwise stated. 

Amateur– “Participating in an activity for pleasure, not as a job; from the French ‘lover of’.” “Unpaid performer.” “Not qualified as a professional.”

Well, that’s me, plus add over seventy-five years of enjoying without becoming expert. But I have had fun in the process. Here’s just a taste:

Around 1973 Mike and Joyce Stephens started a little company to produce white metal model cars in both kit and built forms. By the 1980’s, their Somerset, England, firm had over thirty employees and were building under their own Western Models name and also for Motor City USA and other companies. Chinese competition cut their success and they became a smaller firm. They retired about 2007 and sold their firm, which now produces mostly plastic airplane models.   (Editor’s note:  Their 1/43 American model cars were bought by an American firm and are now sold as detailed handbuilts!) But for several years, the Stephens’ Western Models, in both 1:43 and 1:24, were admirable projects for amateur builders.

This is one of them, Number 43, the 1936 SS1 Tourer, probably produced in the early 1980s. Its 1:1 master was built in the mid-1930s by SS Cars Ltd., perhaps at that time better known as the old Swallow Sidecar Company and later as Jaguar. I bought it on eBay for less than 20 US Dollars.

Buying models on the secondary market (that means “used” or at least “previously owned”) can be risky. These parts can be small, tiny, miniscule, and all that means “easily lost.” This one I found in sealed envelopes, but somehow by the time of final assembly one door handle was missing. I fashioned a replacement and it seems okay. After all, one can’t see both sides of the model at the same look.

The other term to consider is “file to fit.” Remember, no matter how many files you have, from a Dremel tool through smaller and smaller files right down to your wife’s fingernail equipment, you still won’t have one that is exactly right. Sometimes it’s “make do with what you have.”

If you’re in a hurry, avoid white metal models. Go find a plastic Heller product and enjoy construction without filing. I recently finished a Heller 1:43 Citroen 11CV and had a lot of fun with it. Well . . . I may have touched it a little with sandpaper a time or two.

Keep an eye out for special features, and also for special problems. This Western SS has some of the best looking wheels I have ever used. They are almost jewelry. I buffed them a little with the Dremel’s soft brush and then mounted them. I also added a driver, probably an Arttista but I’m not sure. Getting him under the wheel was another “file to fit” chore. And fitting the windshield? Right now, after all the photography, the model is out on the desk with no windshield, waiting for yet another fitting. In one of the pictures, I noticed a gap where the body’s rear side panel meets the rear fender. Yep. It’s there. I tried to readjust it with the rear screw, but it doesn’t happen. This one I will live with.

Finally, develop a thick skin. There’s nothing like a combination of zoom lenses, enlarged pictures, and collectors who buy 200-dollar models assembled by the nimble fingers of people who grew up with chop sticks to point out flaws in your completed final product. Remember: building white metal models in 1:43 scale is fun. That’s the mantra to keep mumbling while down on the floor hunting for that door handle.


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De Agostini Dinky UK Series – 157 Jaguar XK120

By Maz Woolley

Photographs by, and copyright of, the Author. 

DeAgostini is still releasing it’s new Dinky Series to the news trade here in the UK though I suspect that it will shortly go on subscription and advance order only. So I bought part 5 of the series, a replica of Dinky 157 Jaguar XK120, to compare with the Atlas Dinky series. The Atlas collection also featured this model but in  a later form in two-tone yellow and white which can be seen here.

The boxes shown below show the two colours initially available at the launch red and green and the box has a green dot printed on it to replicate the factory markings appropriate for this model.

Looking on the box we can see that where Atlas once features DeAgostini is listed in both UK and Italy where this series is currently running. If only one could understand their Lot codes, does 2016 mean that this has been sitting in a warehouse since then for distribution here and in Italy?

The XK120 was made between 1948 and 1954 with the Fixed Head Coupe arriving in 1951. It was an outstanding success looking more beautiful than the products of many coachbuilders at a fraction of the cost and fitted with a superb straight six engine that would go on to power the E Type. It was widely bought to race both in the US and UK.

The DeAgostini have had their replica painted in the earlier plain colours which were available from the launch in 1954 to around 1956 when they were “jazzed up” with two tone colours.

The wheels are painted in a brown shade similar to the hubs on the Dinky Standard Vanguard which makes a slightly strange impression. However, this combination is entirely correct for an early model.

This Dinky captures the sensuous curves of the XK120 very well and must have been a very popular toy at the time because there are still many to be seen at toy fairs in a variety of conditions.

The next model to be issued by DeAgostini in this range is the Renault Dauphine in Minicab livery from 1962 with adverts printed on it which is an attractive model.

Editor’s correction: Reader Ian Hunt has pointed out that there is an insert in the magazine which says that instead of the next model shown on the back cover the next model will actually be a Fiat 600. 


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GFCC Toys – Jaguar SS1

By Maz Woolley

Photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

Earlier this month Graeme Ogg introduced us to the 1959 Pontiac model in this range. Now the Jaguar SS1 mentioned in that article has arrived from a China based eBay trader. Although called a Jaguar SS1 It should just be an SS1 as the name Jaguar was adopted by William Lyons after the production of the SS1 had finished.

This model is very different to the Pontiac Graeme covered. The SS1 being similar to earlier Dinky models with no glazing, suspension or interior. However, the bumpers and lights are solid shiny silver metal as are the wheels which is a little different to Dinky. The GFCC Jaguar SS1 model is available in dark red, cream, and dark green.

The model is well shaped with the lovely flowing rear end and a nicely detailed and painted grille, though that could have been painted to represent the silver radiator shell as well but has not been. It is based upon the Airline streamlined body available in the mid-1930s.

It is curious that the box of the Pontiac was artificially aged but the box for this older style model is not. More surprising still is the fact that the spare wheels are not fixed to the car at all and only stay on the running boards when pressed hard into the depressions moulded for them.

My model was sent from China but GFCC seems to be a registered brand of Tongbo Toys. This brand is registered in Europe as well as the US and may be a trading company brand rather than a pure producer. Maybe they pick up models developed in China for other ranges or speculatively and not proceeded with?

I will certainly keep my eyes open for what comes next from GFCC Toys.


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Tekno Wossat – Shedding some light

By Robin Godwin

Photographs are by, and copyright of the Author.

Back in November 2016, the editor posted my Wossat article on an unidentified Jaguar E-Type Roadster in 1:43 scale that had clearly been copied from the earlier Tekno model http://www.maronline.org.uk/tekno-wossat/

Well, I can now shed some light on the topic (hopefully you will forgive me for that as you read on) as I have now found a second, more complete example. The pictures show that this must have been a (possibly commercial) display model of some sort. I didn’t realise it when inspecting the first model for the earlier article, but the headlights are operative! The unexplained hole in the base is the pass through for the wiring to the headlights, and on re-inspection of my first model, I can see wires thru the hole in the base leading to the lights that were cut to make it a static display model.

The model is mounted to a chromed circular base with screws via the two screw holes discussed in the first article. A rotary switch turns the headlights on and off. But there is more – there’s an electric motor hidden in the chrome base with the drive axle protruding from the bottom, so it is evident that the whole chromed brace would rotate with the model fixed on it. I know nothing about electricity (except on and off), so cannot verify if the light switch also activated the motor via the two AA batteries, but if that were true, then my motor is inoperative. I don’t see any further attachment points for electricity supply, nor is there a pass through in the plastic insert for additional wires if the power source was exterior to the batteries housed in the chromed base. That said, there is obviously still something missing, as this whole structure would have been mounted to something else, but what? Of note, both the electric motor and white plastic insert to the chromed base, visible in the pictures, are marked “Japan” so that may be a clue to it’s origin. Japan has an early history of copying models, and the original Tekno E-Type was from the 1960s, but I can only speculate here.

I’ll continue to try to get to the bottom of this mystery.

 

4216 Lights on and firmly attached to chrome base

 

4218 This angle shows the on/off switch for lights and perhaps even for rotation of the whole unit

4221 Plastic disc on left fits snugly into the round chrome base. Hole in centre allow for axle of electric motor to pass thru, but no room for anything else. Motor is firmly attached to the chrome base, so the whole unit would have rotated on an additional base of some sort


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Neo and BoS September/October 2017

By Maz Woolley

All photographs supplied by, and copyright of, ModelCarWorld.

Market Positioning

Over the last year we have seen prices steadily rising from many suppliers. ModelCarWorld who own Neo, MCG, BoS and other ranges appear to be trying to contain their price rises in the same way that Oxford Diecast are. For example Neo models are now about 25% cheaper than Matrix models and MCG 1:18 scale models are about the same price as a 1:43 MaxiChamp. In contrast their BoS 1:87 scale models have crept up in price and now look rather expensive though their only competition is German made and is quite expensive too.

Many of the models shown are re-colours of previously released castings.

1:18 Scale

ModelCarWorld have models made for them in China to 1:18 scale. BoS models are resin cast and Model Car Group are diecast. Neither range has opening parts.

BoS-Models.

 

213751 Oldsmobile Rocket 88, Black 1949

 

213725 Triumph TR 7 DHC, Metallic Beige, RHD 1976

 

215128 Cadillac Fleetwood Series 75, Black 1967

 

214628 Jaguar XJ 4.2C, Yellow/Black, RHD 1974

 

214633 Maserati 5000 GT Allemano, Red 1960

 

Model Car Group (MCG)

 

220257 Barkas B 1000 Halbbus, Volkspolizei 1970

 

209979 Tatra 87, Silver and Dark Red 1937

 

220256 Wolga M24-10, Red 1985

1:43 Scale

Neo

All these models are moulded in resin in China for Germany.

There have been few 1:43 BoS releases lately and some recent Neo models have been regarded as BoS finish for Neo prices. Comments have been made suggesting the red shade shown in the pictures of the second issue of the Humber Sceptre is too bright and is also incorrectly sprayed at the rear where the red colour should go into the “V” round the rear lights and does not.

ModelCarWorld are certainly getting the most out of their S & S 1966 Ambulance moulding producing it in a variety of colours and equipment. The Buick Flxible Premier has recently been seen modelled by Ixo in the German Atlas series of Ambulances which may limit the sales of the Neo.

 

186011 Humber Sceptre MK I, Red and White, RHD 1963

 

186015 Morgan Plus 4 Plus, Red, RHD

 

180791 Cadillac S&S Ambulance Fire Rescue

 

156253 Cadillac S&S Ambulance, White 1966

 

215306 Dodge Sportsman, Metallic Green and White 1973

 

213737 Mercedes C111-IID, Metallic dark Orange 1976

 

156314 Cadillac S & S Ambulance, Red/White 1966

 

167757 Cadillac S&S Landau Hearse, Black

 

215577 Buick Flxible Premier,Red/White 1960 Ambulance

 

192388 Maybach SW35 Stromlinie Spohn, Black and Brown  1935

1:87 Scale

BoS Models

These resin models made in China for Germany replaced the previous Neo 1:87 range which was expensive and sold slowly with ModelCarWorld still having some available for bargain prices long after the range was stopped. The BoS 1:87 Range was supposed to offer similar interesting subjects but with less expensive finishing. Even so some models still feature p-e parts and some fine details.

For me the most interesting of this months releases are the tractor units from Pegaso and Bernard, though these are quite a bit more expensive than the cars. They certainly add options for 1:87 collectors and if they stick to cab units that the mainstream 1:87 producers are unlikely to release they could sell well.

215516 Mercedes AMG G 63 6×6, Metallic-Beige 2013

 

215124 Pegaso Comet, Beige and Brown 1964

 

218690 Horch 853 Special Coupe, Black 1937

 

214786 Studebaker Commander Starliner, red/white 1953

215122 Bernard TD 150, Light Blue 1955


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Oxford Diecast XK150 Roadster

By Maz Woolley

Oxford Diecast have now released their XK150 in Carmen Red which somehow looks more exciting than in white as it was before. This model is to 1:43 scale and diecast in Oxford’s China plant for the UK.

The XK150 roadster was the last development of the original XK shape before the E Type replaced it in 1961. It is beautiful classic car and the Oxford model is welcome especially as a Roadster as the Drophead Coupé was made in the Matchbox Dinky range.

The car Oxford based this model on can be seen on the web and the model is largely correct, though I think the interior may be in red or tan leather and the dashboard should probably be red with a sliver inset panel. However, this is not an issue on a model in this price range as the interior is generally accurate with items picked out on the door cards and for a budget priced model the dash detail has been nicely done with white panel printed instruments. There is a lovely steering wheel with chromed spokes and wooden rim too.

The Oxford model has with lovely paint and excellent “chrome fitments” for the most part. However, when you look close at the model I bought you can see issues which really shouldn’t exist.

Firstly you can see above the chrome number plate surround is miss-shaped and shorter on one side.  Secondly when supplied one of the rear light clusters was at an angle which I have carefully corrected for the photographs, and finally the printing of the rear lights was badly offset.

 

It really is a shame that these faults should exist as it does mar what is otherwise excellent model from Oxford Diecast.


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