Category Archives: Ford

The Ford in Miniature – 2001 Fortyniner

By Dave Turner

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

Around Ford’s Centenary in 2003 numerous events and creations were produced to celebrate the achievement . One of these was a concept called the Fortyniner as a tribute to the 1949 Ford that in reality could be said to have saved the company in the years following the Second World War. Two examples were created, a black closed car with an all glass top and a red convertible.

That original ’49 Ford featured what was regarded as radical new styling for the time embodying a simple shape with clean body panels combined with what were then modern conveniences. The 1949 Ford was presented with the Fashion Academy Award in both 1949 and 1950. This fifty year later concept car appeared in 2001 and was styled keeping to those original ideas and marrying them to what were significant custom car touches from the period as well as modern elegant and clean lines from Italian designers such as Ghia.

Appearing a year earlier in 2000 was the new Thunderbird concept that subsequently went into production in virtually the same form. Much of the character of this new Thunderbird was also incorporated into the Fortyniners styling.

The concept was powered by a 3.9 litre 32 valve V8 Thunderbird engine, the front fender badges are in the Thunderbird style and are lettered “Powered by”.

So far the only model of the Fortyniner concept to be found came from Auto Art at the time of the real thing and as usual they have done a superb job of it. At 1:18 it represents the ‘closed’ version and captures the simple but elegant lines perfectly having opening doors hood and trunk, steerable front wheels and a complete interior. The latter features the distinctive central ‘console’ that was part of the cars structure while such things as the cruise and radio controls located on the steering wheel was done to echo those bright horn rings of fifty years previous – have all been depicted. Turning the model over reveals a plethora of engine, transmission, drive line, steering and suspension detail. Beware, while enjoying the examination the projecting mirrors are vulnerable and delicate.

Auto Art China 72031 2003 Fortyniner concept closed 266mm 1:18 Diecast
Illustrations:

 

 

Auto Art 1:18 diecast from China: 72031, Ford Fortyniner concept.

Auto Art 1:18 diecast from China: 72031, rear view of Fortyniner.

 

With MIRA 1:18 diecast from Spain: 6250, 1949 Ford Coupe the inspiration for the Fortyniner concept.

Rear view of the two Ford Coupes.


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Models 56 by Armco and a Load of Cobras: Part 2 Cobras

By Mick Haven

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author. Photographs will be found at the end of the article.

As mentioned previously in MAR Online, Gateway Models near Brisbane, which Graeme referred to, is the trader I have dealt with the longest, probably seventeen years or so. I was fortunate enough to pay them a visit while down there in September 2017. From the outside it looks nothing like a model shop. Appearances are deceptive. It takes something special to keep me quiet but I was temporarily speechless there, and I didn’t see all of it. The place is stacked with model cars.

He also mentions the Falcon ‘Cobra’ GT, although I’m not sure that ‘GT’ is the correct title as I believe the correct designation is ‘XC’. The XC followed on from the very successful XA/XBGT ranges, produced from 1973 to 1976. The XC family was introduced in 1976, and would include a GS500 ‘Hardtop’, a large coupe, not dissimilar to the afforementioned Torino. In October 1977, Allan Moffat, partnered by Formula 1 legend, Jacky Ickx, would win the legendary Hardie-Ferodo 1000 at Bathurst in an XC GS500 Hardtop, in the famous ‘1-2 form finish’ for Team Moffat. By the end of the race his car was virtually brakeless and should have come second, but he was team owner and orders is orders.

By the end of 1977, Ford Australia had built 13 ‘special order’ XC GS500 Hardtops. The modifications on these cars would become the basis for the Cobra XC ‘Option 97’. The company decided to capitalise on the 1977 Bathurst result and wanted to go racing so they needed a suitable car. Four hundred examples of whatever they chose had to have been built to meet CAMS homologation rules. It just so happened they had four hundred XC bodies left over with no buyers when production of the big coupe ceased in April 1978.

Rather than scrap them, Edsel Ford II, who was Ford Australia Managing Director. at the time, suggested they be saved and could be offered to the public as a road going race car. Production began in July of that year. I believe I read some time ago that Carroll Shelby was approached for permission to call the car ‘Cobra’, and to use the familiar Shelby stripes and Cobra badging. By coincidence, the colour scheme was the international colours for American racing cars, as seen on the Le Mans Cunninghams of the 1950s, e.g. Britain had its British Racing Green, Italy was red, France blue and so on.
Four hundred blue and white road going Cobra XCs were built, in two variants, Option 96 and Option 97. Of the four hundred, only 30 were Option 97s. These were numbered from 002 to 0031, and would be known as ‘Bathurst Specials’. The first two hundred would have a 5.8L 351 cu.in. motor, the remainder would have a 4.9L 302 cu. in. Two exceptions were car number 001 which would have the 302 cu. in. motor, and car number 351 which had a motor of that capacity.

There are a number of differences between the two, mainly under the skin, but the most obvious externally is the addition of a ‘power bulge’ on the bonnet of the Option 97 in addition to the two ‘flared nostril’ intakes already in place on the Option 96, and on previous XAs, XBs and XCs, including four door saloon, estate, Ute and van variants. The XC Cobras would also have their own blue and black seats and ‘Globe’ alloy wheels. I’ve got three of these, one in 1:64th scale, one in 43rd scale and one in 1:18th, all by Biante. In model and 1:1 scale, Option 97s are sought after. A genuine full size Option 97 can command big dollars if and when one comes up for sale. Even the Option 96 doesn’t come cheap, but these do get offered from time to time, with prices usually around $100,000 AUD, some more, some less.

Graeme makes mention of its size, citing, ‘some views show it to be a compact’. I’ve referred to it as the ‘big coupe’. So how big were they? They are, or were, easily on a par with the Holden (Vauxhall) Monaro and Audi A5 coupe familiar on UK roads today. For comparison the XAGT coupe was 4808 mm L x 1969 W x 1369 H. The Monaro and A5 are 4789 L x 1841 W x 1397 H and 4673 L x 2029 W x 1371 H respectively, so compact they weren’t. It weighed in at 3500 lbs. I did see one at Ford Fair some years ago and compact it wasn’t. Also, some time ago, I exchanged e mails with a guy who lived in the Oxfordshire countryside and he had an XC Cobra. Negotiating those narrow country lanes with it was interesting to say the least. Attached are the pics he sent me. What I didn’t know at the time was that there were the two variants. Looking at the pics while writing this, I noticed that it’s an Option 97. How much is that worth today? I think he worked for TWR at the time as one picture shows the car outside TWRs premises. I know he emigrated to Australia taking the XC with him. There is much racing footage of them on You Tube. I imagine they were a real handful at racing speeds and they would clock up to 170 mph down Conrod Straight.

From a collecting perspective, the 1:43rd scale is one which I’ve had as long or longer than virtually of all my Australians, for at least fifteen years, possibly more. It almost certainly came from those good ol’ boys at Gateway. The 1:18th scale came next, bought at a Ford dealership near Melbourne, and the 1:64th example by Biante Minicars would eventually follow some years later. Even so, I’ve had that since at least 2011, as it was in a display of Ford models I showed when the club, South Hants Model Auto Club put on a display at Ford fair that year. I also had another one in 1:87 scale by Cooee Road Ragers (Made under contract by Oxford Diecast). The Biante Minicars 1:64 example is my only Option 97 Cobra XC in the familiar white with blue stripes colour scheme, the other two being Option 96s. The total number of Option 97s I have in three scales is eight, of which two are 1:18 scales two are 1:64 scale, and the remainder in 1:43.

One is the Allan Moffat/John Fitzpatrick GS 500 Hardtop ‘Federation’ car number 25 from Bathurst 1979, and I have one of those in 1:43rd scale and one by Biante Minicars. The other 1:18 scale is Biante’s Carter/Lawrence ‘Brian Wood Ford’ from Bathurst 1978, resplendent in its overall dark blue with red and yellow stripes with wide yellow ‘Magnum’ five slot racing wheels with slick tyres. Two of the 1:43rd scales are as raced in 1978 and 1979, by Dick Johnson, the latter a car which he co-drove with ex Formula 1 and Le Mans winner Vern Schuppan at Bathurst. The ‘79 car would be dubbed ‘reverse Cobra’, owing to the body colours being ‘the other way round’ i.e. with white stripes over blue, rather the more familiar blue stripes on a white body. A unique feature about the stripes was in their application and defied the norm. Apparently, rather than take a white body and then apply the blue stripes across the body and along the sides, the blue bits  were applied first, then taped over and the car painted white. Very odd.

Another one is the 1978 Bathurst XC Cobra of once again, Moffat and Ickx, carrying race #1, relating to their win the year before. They couldn’t repeat the heroics of 1977 and the car was a DNF. The other model shown is of the Garry Wilmington/Jeff Barnes 1978 Bathurst runner. This model was produced by Trax in 1993, by whom I have two Falcon road coupes, one of which is an Option 97. Trax also released a Cobra XC Option 96 and a small number of other XBGT and XCs in 1:43 scale, including the # 25 Federation car and the ‘Brian Wood Ford’. They also produced a model of the Jack and Geoff Brabham car from Bathurst 1977. The total number of XA/XB and XC coupes in my collection is twenty seven in three scales, including, aside from the Moffat/Ickx ’77 car, the XAGT Bathurst winners from 1973 and ’74, plus one XBGT saloon by Trax from their Opal range. There are a number of XC Cobra models in other scales by other manufacturers. OzLegends have both Option 96 and 97 in 1:32 scale and these can be found on eBay. Dinkum Classics is another manufacturer of the popular coupe. Models of XA/XB GTs can occasionally be found on eBay, and some via dealers ‘down under’, of which I’m happy to report, there are still a large number. Biante’s XC Cobra in 1:43 scale is rarer, while an Option 96 in 1:18 scale, although slightly less rare, commands good money, see below. Those with deeper pockets may be interested in XA/XB and XCs in 1:18 scale. For example, at the time of writing, Hobby_Link have a Biante Auto Art Moffat/Ickx 1978 Bathurst XC in that scale, for a mere £462.56 plus just £13.11 shipping, or $809.95 + $22.95 AUD if you prefer. Gateway have an Option 96 for just £227.87 + £51.40 shipping, or $489.00 including shipping. Seen on eBay is the Moffat #25 car at £313.46 + £40.68 shipping. This model doesn’t even have the  ‘Camel’ sponsor decals, owing to tough Australian tobacco advertising laws. They can be obtained from other sources. As with all internet buys, prices vary from seller to seller. Then there’s always the added danger of getting stung by Customs and Royal Mail. Ouch! Sometimes I’ve been caught, other times I’ve got lucky and paid nothing. As an owner of more than twenty 1:18th scales by both Biante and Classic Carlectables, I should add that they are superb and worth every penny.

When I first started collecting them all those years ago, I was astonished at the quality and detail to be found on them, and at the time, with a good exchange rate, great value for money too. Many have opening doors boot and bonnet, steerable wheels and fully detailed engines with plug leads etc, and detailed undersides and interiors, despite being well over ten years old. Biante’s FPV GT nee Falcon XR8, even has a carpeted boot mat and a fire extinguisher. Although a tad more expensive these days, they still make great value. The race cars are truly magnificent. Collectors of Scalextric are not ignored either. There are many fine slot car models of Australian race cars which would make great display models. There’s a plethora of them on eBay including the XA/XB XCs and V8 Supercars. Earlier in the year I took delivery of their Dick Johnson Sierra RS500 1989 Bathurst winner and very nice it is too. Shame about the driver figure. Is that really the great man? How fortunate I am that neither my house or my wallet are overly large.

 

Just for the record, for any MAR Online readers who may be interested in exploring the wonderful world of Australian die casts, I can thoroughly recommend the following traders; Biante, Gateway, Motorfocus, Kollectable Kaos, Jays Models, Pit Stop Models, Top Gear aka Trax, Ace Models, Replicars and Automodelli among many others. There’s always eBay of course from where I got many of mine, but beware, many sellers on eBay au, won’t post up here. If they do they’ll be on eBay UK. A model shop, where you can browse to your hearts content, still exists in Australia. In the early days, I was even ordering them from main car dealers, who usually stock a fine selection of models appertaining to the brand of car, e.g. Ford or Holden. DJR race car models can also be ordered directly from DJR/Team Penske. Classic Carlectables, another fine brand, cannot be sourced directly from them, but the XA, XB and XC doesn’t feature in their range. Their excellent web site does list every model they have ever produced, including a picture of each one and the release date. Biante’s web site does list all their releases since 1998 under the heading, ‘customer service’, then ‘view the list here’, but it stops at 2014 and there are no pictures. The coupes were released long before that.

Give the above traders and models, and eBay a look, you won’t be disappointed. Appreciation for some of the above goes to ‘Wiki’ and to Bill Tuckey from his book   ‘True Blue’ 75 Years of Ford in Australia.


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A Brazilian in Australian V8 Supercars

By Sergio Luis dos Santos

I live in Brazil and collect 1:43 scale cars from Brazilian drivers but no “open wheels” like Formula 1 or Indy cars. This makes my collection very specialized and keeps me on the hunt for hard-to-find and special editions, as well as some modified models.

As for the Australian V8 Supercars, Max Wilson raced there from 2002 to 08;  some info his career is here: https://www.driverdb.com/drivers/max-wilson/. Unfortunately,  only the cars from 2002, 03 and 04 seasons were released by Biante. They are also found in 1:64 and 1:18 scale. They are hard to find outside Australia so my search went through Australian eBay and some local shops that would ship the models to Brasil.

The Biante cars are:
  1. Ford AU Falcon Nº 65, 2002 season. Model nº 286 of 2000 released.
  2. Ford BA Falcon Nº 18, 2003 season. Model nº 193 of 2000 released.
  3. Ford BA Falcon Nº 888, 2004 season. Model nº 242 of 1000 released.

The models are very finely done (good details and tampo printing) but were manufactured years ago.  Looking at Biante’s current offerings, they may look even better.  Since there are no more Brazilian drivers racing them, I haven´t bought any of the newer releases.  Maybe one day Biante will release the other Max Wilson cars so I could fill in the gap years: 2005 to 08.

To show some further models, here are two more cars raced by Max Wilson in Brasil.
  1. Alfa Romeo 155 V6 TI Nº 19. He raced at Interlagos, São Paulo, in the ITC Championship in 1996.  An easy mod using an HPI model.
  2. Chevrolet Sonic Nº 65 from the Brazilian Stock Car partworks. He raced this car in the 2016 season.

I hope you enjoy these photos!

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News from the Continent September 2018 – Busch

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

All text by, and copyright of, the Author. Photographs provided by the manufacturer.

Here are the new releases from Busch for September. All are moulded in plastic to 1:87 scale.

Combine harvester Progress E514

The successor of the type E512 was in a number of points improved self-driving harvesting machine for threshing cereals, oilfruits and pulses.Production started in 1982. In the former DDR, the vehicle was also used for harvesting maize and sunflowers.

40174 Combine harvester Progress 514 with maize picker – blue
40175 Combine harvester Progress 514 with maize picker – green

 

41710 Pontiac Firebird TransAm – red

 

45001 Chevrolet Bel Air – Flames

Car2go:

The concept: Smart forTwo cars parked around the City which can be hired like the bicycle schemes in many cities.

46135-01 Smart Fortwo 07 Car2go – free tanker
46135-02 Smart Fortwo 07 Car2go – Local patriot
46135-03 Smart Fortwo 07 Car2go – Rhineland Express

 

46656 Plymouth Fury “Tennessee State Trooper

 

47365 Citroen Jumper “French Gendarmerie”

 

47524 Ford Mustang Cabriolet with soft top – yellow

 

49820 Mercedes-Benz M-Class W164 “Emergency Doctor – Herford”

 

50362 Land Rover Defender “British Airport”

 

51127 Mercedes-Benz Vito “Patrol car of the German Autobahn Police”

 

51128 Mercedes-Benz Vito “Portugesian Taxi”

 

51167 Mercedes-Benz V-Class “Politi (Norwegian Police)”

Barkas Collection latest releases

Eight differently coloured and liveried Barkas V901/2 half-bus or box van have been produced as a mini-series.

51292 Barkas Halfbus V901/2 No. 7 “BVF Carburettor Factory of Berlin”

51293 Barkas Halfbus V901/2 No. 8 “KfZ Werke Ernst Grube Werdau”

 

51508 IFA G5 1959 “NVA loaded with convoy-way plates”

The 6×6 truck loaded with typical pre-manufactured concrete pieces for the reinforcement of the paths along the German/German border.

51509 IFA G5 1960 “NVA with crane and loaded with boundary posts”

51605 Robur LO 1800A “Measuring vehicle for tractor tests”

EsPeWe Models 1:87 Scale

 

95234 IFA W50 LA/A “Sea rescue service”

95236 IFA W50 LA/A “Fire brigade”

Busch Aircraft models

 

25018 Messerschmitt Bf 109 G6 Hungary

The Me 109 G6 aircraft from 1944 is painted in the colours of the 101st fighter group, also known as the Puma Group. The group was created under the command of wing commander Aladar Heppes for the Royal Hungarian Airforce. Approximately 760 aircraft fought with the Luftwaffe against the Red Army along the Eastern Front during the Second World War.


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A few new Aussies from 2018

By Mick Haven

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author. 

Having just read Dave Turner’s Aussie Ford feature, happy to say I’m the proud owner of many of those pictured, and some!

Pictured below are some of the models that I’ve been able to obtain from ‘down under’ over the last year. An interesting mix of racing and street cars.

Biante Minicars Falcon XD and XE

 

 

Dick Johnson’s Mustang

 

 

New Biante Falcon

 

 

Trax Falcon

 

 

Trax Mk II Zephyr Ute

 


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The Ford in Miniature – Falcon XA, XB and XC 1972-79

By Dave Turner

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

Ford Falcon XA

Replacing the US designed Falcon XY in February 1972 the XA was the first Falcon to be completely designed and produced in Australia. While based on the preceding XY and having the same wheelbase, the bulkier and bolder styled body was a couple of inches longer. Five levels in the sedan line started with the basic version, the 500, the Futura, the Fairmont and the GT. 2 door hardtops came as the 700, the Fairmont and the GT. The wagons on a 5 inch longer wheelbase (the same as the contemporary ZF Fairlane) came as the basic version, the 700 and the Fairmont. Then there were the basic and 500 Utility and the van.

Engine choices were a couple of straight sixes in 3.2 and 4.1 litre sizes and a couple of V8s of 4.9 litres and 5.7. The four door sedans featured the ‘coke bottle’ line rather like being a larger version of the Cortina MkIII while the 2 door coupes boasted very deep rear quarters with rather sinister looking rear side windows quite different to the sedans.

As usual various options and specials add to the complexity for example the Grand Sport Rally Pack ‘boy-racered’ up the base, the 500 and the Fairmont while the proposed GT-HO Phase IV was abandoned after just one example. Just 250 of the GT – RPO 83 Falcons were made – 130 sedans and 120 hardtops, and differed only by a few mechanical upgrades with no external changes. Another limited run were the Falcon 500 Superbird RPO – 77 hardtops featuring considerable mechanical upgrades to engine, suspension, instrumentation complete with rear window louvre.

The up-market version of the Falcons were the bigger Fairlanes but these differed from the regular Falcon in size and equipment sufficiently to demand a separate feature – sometime.

Australia seems to have a reasonably healthy model car supply base with several local operations providing miniatures of their home-grown product. For example Top Gear/Trax may be the most familiar on this side of the globe although Classic Carlectibles and Oz Legends have also been imported.

Oz Legends have in fact provided quite a few models of the XA in a variety of 1:32 scale diecast sedans, hardtop and Ute versions. Most of which appear to be limited to 2,500 examples and feature opening doors, hood and trunk. Classic Carlectibles have gone the 1:18 scale route with slight variation on the same subjects.

Back on 1:32 a range on the Signature label (Yatming?) has a few sedans, hardtops and utes and inevitably concentrates on the higher performance end of the line and like the other makes includes a few customised examples. Auto Art offered some Aussie Falcon Hardtops under the Biante name in both 1:18 and 1:43 scales.

Top Gear/Trax seem to have concentrated on 1:43 for most of their vast range of Ford models but the only XA seems to be the 1972 GT Sedans in at least four colours. These came in the relatively expensive Opal Series that featured a vast amount of detail for 1:43. All four doors open as well as bonnet and boot while the interior and engine compartment are detailed to an incredible degree. The door windows are in the lowered position so that the interior can be viewed without opening the doors.

Falcon XA Models

Oz Legends
Ute 150mm 1:32 diecast
Ute GT 150mm 1:32 diecast
Hardtop GT 150mm 1:32 diecast
Hardtop GT RPO-83 150mm 1:32 diecast
Sedan GT 150mm 1:32 diecast
Sedan GT  RPO-83 150mm 1:32 diecast
Classic Carlectibles
18268 China Superbird hardtop show car 250mm 1:18 diecast
18448 China Hardtop GT RPO-83 250mm 1:18 diecast
18545 China Sedan GT HO Phase 1V 250mm 1:18 diecast
18615 China Sedan GT RPO-83 250mm 1:18 diecast
18640 China Hardtop GT 250mm 1:18 diecast
Signature
China Hardtop 351GT 150mm 1:32 diecast
China Utility GT 150mm 1:32 diecast
China Utility GS 150mm 1:32 diecast
China 2016 Sedan GT 150mm 1:32 diecast
Auto Art/Biante
72725 China Hardtop GT 1:18 diecast
72726 China Hardtop Superbird 1:18 diecast
72747 China Hardtop GT 1:18 diecast
China Hardtop GT 1:43 diecast
Trax
T005 China 2008 Sedan GT Ltd 2400 112mm 1:42 diecast

Falcon XB

Succeeding the XA in November 1973 the XB was very similar but featured a few subtle changes to the bonnet and grille – the latter having a central divider. The sedans got larger tail lights that featured a wrap-around section at each side. Once again there were some ‘specials’ such as the Sovereign Edition based on the 500 and celebrating Ford Australia’s 50th Anniversary. The John Goss Specials were Hardtop 500s with decals and a GT bonnet named after a local race driver while the McCleod Horn Specials were produced by a Sydney Ford dealership and identified by a large strobe stripe on the body side.

The Australian model suppliers have provided even more of the XB series than of the previous one. The same names crop up again but with the addition of a new one on this subject – Hot Wheels, who offered a XB Coupe in no less than 20 versions, and apart from the unsightly wheels they are reasonably acceptable.

Most of the previously mentioned ranges offered both custom and competition versions of the standard issues while some are detailed to a commendably degree once again. For example the 1:43 Auto Art XB GT 351 Hardtop features a great deal of underside detail – even steerable front wheels while deciding not to bother with opening doors etc, and probably looks neater as a result. The Trax Opal Series XB GT 351 Sedan followed their XA in featuring a mass of detail plus opening parts quite neatly. The Oz Legends range now included a trio of Panel Vans.

Falcon XB Models

Oz Legends
Sedan GT 140mm 1:32 diecast
Ute GT 140mm 1:32 diecast
Sedan GS 140mm 1:32 diecast
Panel Van GT 1:32 diecast
Panel Van 1:32 diecast
Hardtop GS 1:32 diecast
Panel Van GS 1:32 diecast
Hardtop GT 1:32 diecast
Classic Carlectibles
Sedan GT 1:18 diecast
18615 Sedan GT RPO-83 1:18 diecast
Hardtop GT John Goss 1:18 diecast
Signature
Hardtop GT 150mm 1:32 diecast
Hardtop GS 150mm 1:32 diecast
Sedan GT 150mm 1:32 diecast
Sedan GS 150mm 1:32 diecast
Ute GS 150mm 1:32 diecast
Auto Art/Biante
52742 China 2003 Hardtop GT 111mm 1:43 diecast
72742 China Coupe GT 1:18 diecast
72796 China Sedan GT 1:18 diecast
72881 China Hardtop GT 1:18 diecast
72886 China Hardtop GT McCleod Horn 1:18 diecast
Trax
T006 China 2008 Sedan GT 351 112mm 1:43 diecast
Hot Wheels
2010 Malaysia 2009 Hardtop GT 351 75mm 1:64 diecast

 

Falcon XC

A second update brought us to the XC Falcon in July 1976 and this was to carry through to March 1979, late examples can be identified by featuring a Ford oval on the XCs horizontal grille. The front of the XC was given a softer look than the XB while a larger rear door window was provided by the use of the Contemporary ZH Fairlane rear doors effectively losing the ‘coke-bottle’ line. Tail lights were now horizontally divided while the GT was replaced by the GXL and the Fairmont given rectangular headlights. A limited run of 400 Cobra Hardtops were finished in white with blue racing stripes.

Models of the XC are far less well represented than the first two of the series. Oz Legends are present again but so far only the Hardtop Cobra has been recorded while the only Auto Art XC seems to be once again the Cobra but in 1:43 this time. Trax have concentrated on the Hardtop to a greater extent, they again did the Cobra first but followed it with at least six further versions, some of them in competition form as the Hardtops were a favourite with the racing fraternity. Another Cobra they did was a model of the projected Phantom that in reality didn’t go into production and this was followed by another rare subject, the GS Homologation Hardtop of which only 13 real examples were made. Finally a model of the production GS Fairmont 4.9 Hardtop was produced. A sedan Fairmont GXL was a recent issue and while it is a highly detailed resin model, it features a degree of stick-on chrome edging – none of which has peeled off yet it must be said.

Falcon XC Models

 

Oz Legends
Hardtop Cobra 140mm 1:32 diecast
Auto Art
52752 China Hardtop Cobra 111mm 1:43 diecast
Trax
TR10 China 1994 Hardtop Cobra Ltd 7500 111mm 1:43 diecast
TR10C China 1998 Hardtop Cobra Phantom 4500 111mm 1:43 diecast
TR10F China 2004 Hardtop GS Homologation 3200 111mm 1:43 diecast
TR10G China 2008 Hardtop GS Fairmont 4.9 2800 111mm 1:43 diecast
TRR 36 China 2016 Sedan Fairmont GXL 115mm 1:43 resin

Illustrations Ford Falcon XA, XB and XC

 

Trax 1:43 diecast from China: TR10G, Hardtop XC GS Fairmont 4.9.

rear of TR10G

Trax 1:43 resin: TRR 36, Fairmont XC GXL

rear of TRR36

 

Hot Wheels 1:64 diecast from Malaysia: 2010, Hardtop XB GT 351 one of at least 20 versions.

 

rear of Hot Wheels

 

Trax 1:43 diecast from China: T006, XB Sedan GT 351.

 

rear of T006

 

Trax 1:43 diecast from China : T005 XA Sedan GT.

 

rear of T005

 

Auto Art 1:43 diecast from China: 52752, XC Hardtop Cobra.

 

rear of 52752

 

Auto Art 1:43 diecast from China: 52742, XB Hardtop GT.

 

rear of 52742

 

Trax 1:43 diecast from China: TR10F, XC Hardtop GS Homologation

 

rear of TR10F

 

Trax 1:43 diecast from China: TR10C XC Hardtop Cobra Phantom.

 

rear of TR 10C

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Coca-Cola Miniature Delivery Cars promotion

By Jerry J. Broz

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author. Translation from Japanese by Fumiaki Ishihama.

These Miniature Delivery Cars were introduced by Japan Coca-Cola Promotion in July 2016. They were available as a free promotional item with purchase of a bottle of Coke or Diet Coke at local convenience stores and lasted until all these promo cars were gone, usually within one or two weeks.

The promotional toy cars were, and still are, common within the  Japanese beverage. The promotional campaigns start suddenly and are gone from the stores in a couple of weeks. One of the past Coca-Cola promo items was four delivery cars with a strap for mobile phones. In recent years there were some more promo items with Coca-Cola logo. One of them was a set of 6 types of pull-back model cars with removable key rings. In 2006 at their 120 anniversary, the Coca-Cola Japan company introduced 24 types of key rings with assorted objects, six of them were models of Coca Cola Delivery Cars.

The Japanese promo cars in small scales, as well as die-cast or plastic model cars in larger scales, are rare finds for collectors outside of Japan.

These miniature cars in Coca-Cola livery, as well as other promotional cars are not available on the open model car market in Japan, the USA, or rest of the world. They are extremely rare to find, especially in a complete sets, even on the eBay or at the swap meets.

The title of the promotion was “Coca-Cola Delivery Miniature Car Collection” and consisted of 12 small, interesting model cars, vans, and trucks, from the year 1913 to the year 2003. The models are made in China to no particular scales, but with a more details than one would expected in the models of this size.

 

(See a few of them in comparison with the size of the US Quarter coin.)

All models, including the wheels and tires, are made from ABS resin with exceptional details.  Each car has clear windows, simulated, simplified interiors, and some of the models have a rows of the simulated Coca-Cola bottles. The very fine, clean and sharp tampo prints and thin stickers of the Coca-Cola corporate, promotional logos and slogans are superior to most of larger die-cast or plastic model cars.

The model cars were: 1913 Ford Model T, 1920 Ford Model AA Truck, 1930 Ford Model A Sedan Delivery.

Second Picture: 1938 Dodge Airflow Refrigerated Van, 1940 Ford Sedan Delivery Commercial Car, 1956 Ford F-100 Pickup.

Third Picture: 1958 Nissan Coball, 1962 Daihatsu Midget, 1965 Dodge A-100.

Fourth Picture: 1990 Ford Econoline Van, 1996,
Mitsubishi Fuso Super Great, and 2003 Dodge Ram Quad Cab.

Twelve models of assorted delivery cars, vans, trucks in Coca-Cola liveries, were inserted into clear blisters (built to conform to the shape of each individual model) to be clearly seen when on display.

 

By folded tabs, the blisters were then attached to the front of the cards (identical for all 12 models). The card itself was then folded such that the ends formed a ring by which the card was attached to the neck of the Coke bottle to boost the promotional value of Coca-Cola Drinks.

 

 

The blister card effectively communicated the name of the promotion and the product’s use and features, while attracting the consumer with a visible model car, blue sky with white clouds background and colourful graphics.

Centered on top of the front side of the blister card is a line “It’s Summer! Be Refreshed!” with on each side of which is “Enjoy Coca-Cola” logo and the “Coke Please!“. line. Under this is the name of the promotion: “Coca-Cola Delivery Miniature Car Collection” with a yellow starburst listing “12 TYPES“. At the bottom of the blister card is line in English “Delivery miniature car collection” printed white on black back ground.

On the top of the back side of the card, in the red box, is a warning: “Caution < to parents> please be sure to read“. This is followed by 10 suggestions on how to safely handle the product. Additional information, (black on the blue background), lists the material from which the model is made. The bottom of the back side of the card, in the white box, lists how to reach the Coca-Cola Promotion Office and the days and hours of business, following by the statement that this product was produced under license from featured car manufacturer and Coca-Cola. The line at the bottom of the card says “For Age Over 6” followed by MADE IN CHINA and in a very small box “Not For Sale“.

Folded and included into the card is a small catalog sheet. The front side (beside the “It’s Summer! Be Refreshed!” “Delivery miniature car collection” and “Coca-Cola Delivery Miniature Car Collection” with a yellow starburst listing “12 TYPES“) the catalogue sheet lists all 12 cars in collection with year and marque description. On the left side of the front page is a detailed description and picture of the featured car.

In the sheet shown, it’s the “1958 Nissan Coball” and under the picture of the truck is brief description of the role the Nissan Coball played in Coca-Cola delivery cars: “Coball is the first domestic Coca-Cola delivery truck that played an active role when sales dramatically increased“.The initial colour of the car was Yellow, but since 1964 it has changed to the Coca-Cola’s Red. The miniature car can be displayed in a diorama setting by placing the catalogue sheet’s back side photo behind the car. The last line says ” This product is made under license by Nissan Motor“.


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Goldvarg September 2018

By Maz Woolley

All text by, and copyright of the Author. Photographs have all been provided by the Manufacturer.

It is amazing to think that Sergio Goldvarg only returned to producing 1:43 scale models just over a year ago. Since then licences have been obtained from Ford and General Motors and once the first cars were released a steady stream of new ones has been announced. The cars are resin moulded to 1:43 scale and finished in China to Sergio’s specification. Lots of attention is paid to having pre-production tryouts made and shown to knowledgeable collectors to help get them absolutely right before production. These pre-production samples also help Sergio to get a good idea of the colours that will sell strongly and builds up a direct relation between the maker and the collectors.

Most of the releases to date have sold out at Goldvarg Collectibles, though some can still be found on the inventories of retail sellers. What is also amazing is that the US price of some of the cars to pre-order today are still at the bargain $99 launch price, and even a few that are not are only $109. This seems to be a bargain price at a time when prices from  European companies like Matrix and Brooklin have increased very significantly over the same period and other competitors are much dearer anyway.

So lets look at some of the models announced but not yet shipped.

1961 PONTIAC CATALINA Twilight Mist

 

The 1961 Catalina sold for less than a Chevrolet Impala yet was fitted with a better automatic box and was kitted out to the standards of a Oldsmobile and was cheaper than that too. The new squarer, straight through, wing styling front and back heralded the start of the much more conservative styling of the early 1960s.

The Goldvarg model captures the complex curves and pressed surfaces very well.

GC-007 B 1970 FORD Galaxie Caramel Bronze

The 1970 Ford Galaxie was a full-sized car. The name was used for the top models in Ford’s full-size range competing with the Chevrolet Impala. Here the Goldvarg model has captured the typical early 1970s shape well and the intricately finished rear chrome panel and badging are worthy of note.

This car is also to be available in metallic silver with a black vinyl roof.

GC-008 A 1965 MERCURY PARK LANE MARAUDER Ocean Turquoise

 

In 1965 the chassis of full-size Ford and Mercury cars was redesigned and the Mercury line was given much flatter sides. a much more slab-sided appearance. Europeans will see the influence of the front end on both the German Ford Taunus 17M and the British Mark III Cortina.

The Goldvarg model again has very fine grille work as well as badging. The car is also available in a nice metallic gold finish.

GC-009 A 1969 FORD TORINO Calypso coral

 

The Ford Torino modelled by Goldvarg is an early car from the second year of production. It is nice to see an earlier Torino as the Starsky and Hutch car has meant that most Torinos produced have been 1973 cars. The Torino filled the mid-range segment and was named after the Italian city of Turin, perhaps to add some suggestion of Italian style to what was only a Ford Fairlane in disguise.

The Goldvarg model looks good even in this early pre-production form with the wheels still not ready to show. The front grille seems to be very neatly replicated and the badging too.It is also to be available in a yellow which is undoubtedly period correct but much less attractive to my eye.

GC010 A 1963 FORD FALCON SPRINT Rangoon Red

 

The Falcon was the small platform in the Ford line up from 1961 onwards. By 1963, there were two and four door sedans, convertibles, wagons and hardtops. In mid-year a V8 was offered for the first time in the Sprint line only. The Sprint acted as a test bed for the soon to be launched Ford Mustang which may have looked very different but was pure Falcon underneath!

The pre-production model has a few parts that are not yet finely finished as I expect that they will be when the model is launched. But  it captures the lights and grille very well as well as side spear and badging.

This model will also be available in Polar White.

1963 Chevy Nova Laurel Green

 

The Chevrolet Chevy II/Nova was the smallest platform for Chevrolet cars and went through five generations after being introduced in 1962. Its influence on GMs former European Opel division is clear to see. Powered by four or six cylinder engines the Chevy II/Nova started out intending to be a thrifty purchase but as time went on more expensive variants rapidly emerged. By 1963 the Nova option for the Chevy II was available in a convertible body style, and a two-door hardtop was available from 1962 to 1965. All Chevy two-door hardtops in the range were marketed as the Sport Coupe .For 1963, the Chevy II Nova Super Sport was released and it featured special emblems, an instrument package, wheel covers, special side mouldings, bucket seats, and floor gear change.

The Goldvarg is still at the prototype phase but  seems to me to capture the original car exceptionally well with excellent fine detailing to finish the relatively simple shape of the car well.

1956 MERCURY MONTEREY Station Wagon

 

The Marquis-Monterey range had a longer wheelbase and longer body than the Ford LTD, Ford Galaxie, and Ford Custom. The 1956 model had a new engine, the 235 hp (175 kW) 312 cu. in. This year, along with the rest of Ford, Mercury cars started to sport the ‘Lifeguard’ safety equipment. The deep-dish steering wheel and safety door locks were standard.

Here the Goldvarg is in very early prototype form and we can expect to see more prototypes as the details are developed and the colours are tested. Here we can see that the shape seems well developed and the side mouldings are being readied for the woodie treatment.

1962 Buick Electra

 

The Buick Electra was a full-size luxury car included in the Buick range from 1959 to 1990.  Famed for its extreme rear wings when first introduced it was offered in many forms over the years and here it is in two door coupe form.  The 1962 model had four VentiPorts per front wing and was restyled from 1961 version. The car was fitted with many luxury fitments as standard but came with a lot of options too.

Again this is an early prototype but it clearly has the correct shape and stance and we can look forward to seeing more developed prototypes in the near future.

1964 Pontiac Grand Prix

 

The 1962-1964 Pontiac Grand Prix achieved strong sales for General Motors during its run,  It set to win over the buyers of Ford Thunderbirds, amongst others. Based on the Catalina hardtop coupe it had unique styling touches and was fitted with T-Bird style bucket seats and a large central console. The name, Grand Prix, was used to add associations to speed and daring. The car could be fitted out with one of five versions of Pontiac’s superb Trophy 389 V-8, from a 230-horsepower economy special to a high-compression Tri-Power version (three two-barrel carburetors) with 348 hp. This, and its lower weight, made the GP faster than the T-Bird. A three-speed manual gearbox was standard, but most GPs were ordered with the new “Roto” Hydra-Matic, a new three-speed torque-converter box. An alternative option taken by enthusiasts was a four-speed manual floorshift.

Again the Goldvarg is in its early stages and much fine detail is yet to be added. The shape appears to be caught very well which is important as the GP is a relatively plain car with limited chrome adornments.

Our look at what is on the way from Goldvarg ends here but I am sure that there are yet other drawings, and work in hand, on yet more models. The current trend for Goldvarg to produce cars from the 1960s seems to be popular with many collectors as there are a lot of cars from that era yet to be modelled well. If you are interested in Goldvarg models their website is https://www.goldvargcollection.com/


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Models 56 by Armco and a Load of Cobras:  Part 1                                                 

By Mick Haven

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author. 

Graeme Ogg’s recent article in MAR Online about his Ford Falcon Landau by Ace Models, and Falcon Cobras interested me, as I have a passion for Australian models. For quite some time now I’ve had seven models from a small Aussie company called Models 56 by Armco. Made in resin, they are Frank Gardner’s Boss Mustang 302 and Chevy Corvair, Jim Richard’s Sidchrome Boss Mustang 351, another Corvair, albeit the same car as above but as raced by Allan Grice, a 1967 Mustang GTA and a 1972 Falcon XYGT-HO, both raced by Ian ‘Pete’ Geoghegan, and a Falcon Landau.

 

I believe that at the time, Models 56 were the only model maker to produce models of these particular cars. Frank Gardner’s Mustang needs little introduction, as it was the ex-Bud Moore Kar Kraft Trans Am car with which he was runner up in the 1970 B.S.C.C. championship. I saw it race on numerous occasions. The Jim Richards car was one which he raced predominantly in the 1973/74 sports sedan championship in both his native New Zealand and Australia. ‘Pete’ Geoghegan raced Mustangs to win the Improved Production class in the 1966 Australian Touring Car Championship, which he would repeat in 1967, ’68 and ’69.

As for the Corvairs, they were hugely successful to put it mildly, so successful in fact they were surrounded by controversy, at least Frank Gardner’s original car was. Having spent a number of very successful years in Europe, including testing the very first Porsche 917, ‘Jack of all Trades’, Frank Gardner, returned home to Australia in 1975 to contest the Sports Sedan Championship. He acquired a Chevy Corvair, built a spaceframe chassis, carried out numerous modifications, wrapped the whole thing with the Corvair body, and installed a 5.0 motor from a Lola Formula 5000 single seater, a formula very popular in the U.K. and Europe in the 1960s and ‘70s. The car was outrageously powerful, so much in fact that other teams started to pay close attention to its legality, some even lodging complaints about it. In its first year it won almost every race, except when it rained. It was so dominant and Gardner so hacked off with the complaints, he offered to start from the back of the grid even if he had claimed pole position, which he did, frequently. He easily won the Sports Sedan Championship in 1977.  He sold the car to Allan Grice who would be champion with it in 1978 and ’79. It’s my understanding that the Corvair may well be inadvertently responsible for the demise of the championship.

The Landau is a model which I have long treasured having in my Aussie collection. The car first saw the light of day in 1973 and was based on the recently introduced XAGT. It was distinguished from the standard XAGT by its vinyl roof and all black full width grille behind which were hidden its foldaway headlamps, similar to those on a Mercury Cougar and the 1970 Ford Torino. The family resemblance between the Torino and XAGT is very evident. The ‘Enemy’ car seen in the ‘Mad Max 2’ film, also looks to have its origins in the Landau, certainly in respect of the grille and vinyl roof. This model is part of the two car set by Auto Art in both 1:43 and 1:18 scales. They also produce a ‘dirty’ version, which can be expensive, if you can find one!

If memory serves me correctly, the Models 56 model was originally offered with either polished ‘five slot’ alloy wheels, like mine, or with full width covers, or those shown on the gold car in Graeme’s pictures. There were various colours, black, with a black vinyl roof, metallic blue and yellow, each with a white roof, and one in a metallic blue/grey with a black roof. At the time I bought the Armco’s, I was receiving regular e mails from founder, John Pisani with updates about their models, many of which sold out very quickly. Communication ceased some while ago and their own web site no longer exists.

There is a web site, www.wixy500.com/production ceases for Armco Models/56, which states that production had ceased, dated May 23rd 2017. I’d bought my models long before that. There is also a picture of many of the models which they had produced. I used to have a brochure but this has long since disappeared. All of their models were superb examples of the type and many were very different from offerings by the ‘major’ Australian model manufacturers. Did anybody else produce a model of Bryan Thompson’s VW 1600 Fastback with its 5 litre Chevy engine, or the late great Peter Brock’s tiny A35 with its huge wing extensions covering very wide racing wheels. There was also a black road going version of this model. All of the above refers to models in 1: 43 scale, many of which sold out very quickly. The cruel irony is that for such a small company with limited resources, they produced superb models, easily as good as anything produced in the northern hemisphere.

For more than fifty years I’ve been an admirer of the Minilite brand of racing wheel. The Geoghegan XYGT-HO and Mustang models have a set of them, as does the Frank Gardner Mustang. The wheels on these models are excellent examples of the famous British race wheel, as are those on the Jim Richards Mustang, which were built ‘in house’ in New Zealand by the car’s builder Murray Nunn, a close pal of Jim Richards.

With the demise of Models 56 I was surprised to see what might ‘appear to be’ the resurrection of some of their moulds under the Ace banner, are these the self same models? I was surprised when what appeared to be former Models 56 models in Graeme’s ‘Ace’ article last year. They have got to be them, haven’t they? Especially bearing in mind that until I saw that article, in all my years of collecting Australian models, I had never heard of Ace Models. All of my Models 56 came direct from Armco. That Models 56 by Armco no longer exists, to me is a great shame.


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Hachette Italy World Buses Part 18

By Fabrizio Panico

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

Parts 52 to 54

This time we’ll look at one of the most popular British buses, a quite rare one from France and another “ethnic” one, from Colombia. All of them are from the Italian Hachette partwork “Autobus dal mondo”, a collection of eighty 1:43 scale bus models, very similar to the French one “Autobus et autocars du monde”, produced in Bangladesh for Ixo.

 

No. 52 (no. 41 in the French collection) Bedford OB 1947 – We have already seen the Bedford history and its TJ Rocket (see part 11, no. 33). And how, established as a subsidiary of Vauxhall in 1930 to manufacture commercial vehicles, it soon became a leading international brand, with substantial export sales throughout the world. Its success was due in large part to the smooth running in-line six cylinder engine with overhead-valves, of Chevrolet origin (the famous stove-bolt six). The semi-forward control “O” type lorry chassis was introduced in August 1939, with a coach-chassis version named “OB“. Duple Coachbuilders modified their Hendonian body to fit the chassis, which was longer than the previous WTB model. Only 73 OB buses were built before production stopped due to the outbreak of the Second World War, After the war it reappeared largely unchanged and was produced till 1951, with a total of almost 13,000 produced.

Duple developed the new “Vista” as the standard coachwork for the postwar OB with elegant curved roof and waistlines. Seating capacity was normally 29 with overhead luggage racks, whilst the rear luggage boot was also used to store the spare wheel. The OB is one of the most popular preserved coaches: more than 180 are still in existence, with nearly 70 in roadworthy condition. They regularly appear in period television programs and movies. Duple Coachbuilders was active from 1919 until 1989 : its name was intended to convey the principle of a single vehicle being suitable for a dual role. Ex-military Ford model Ts were converted to a small touring car body that could be transformed into a van by removing the decking at the rear and fitting a van top. This dual-purpose body was then built also on Morris Cowley and Oxford chassis, production ceasing around the end of the 1920s.

Coachwork had been built since the inception of the company, but in 1928 it was decided to make an effort to increase output of this body type. By the middle of the 1930s bus bodies were produced in quite large numbers with a busy export business. After the war there was a move towards metal-framed bodies, but the 1950s brought a difficult time for the coachbuilding industry as there was a rapid decline in orders and competition became intense. The 1980 deregulation of coach services for journeys of over 30 miles caused the market for light coach chassis to collapse. Duple’s output fell from 1,000 bodies in 1976, to 340 in 1983. In July 1989, the decision was made to close down the Duple operation, some parts of it sold to domestic rival Plaxton.

The scale model is based on one of the preserved buses, with the usual combination of a metal body and a plastic baseplate with minimal detail. It is in a bright livery in cream and green. The destination plate reads Dartmouth, and the operator is Southern National.

The registration was issued by Devon County Council. The model is quite heavy. It is true to the original shape and the livery and registration plate seem to be authentic, but why is the side indicator near the door gold instead of orange? Many small separate parts are fitted, lights, mirrors, and wipers for example. A very nicely modelled front grille is fitted with the Bedford logo and script. The Duple logo is printed on the bonnet sides.  A basic interior is fitted but the drivers area is well modelled. The tyres are nicely moulded but the wheels are ugly.  The identical coach has been reproduced in 1:24th scale by Sun Star (but in that case it is indicated as from 1949). There are no apparent differences to the French edition. A nice reproduction of a once familiar sight on British roads.

 

No. 53 (no. 42 in the French collection) Chausson ANG 1956 – We have already met Chausson, its history and its succesful APH bus from 1950 (see part 5, no. 14) and how, beside making components for the automotive industry, they started producing car and unitary bus bodies. During the post war boom Chausson supplied thousands of buses to many French cities, but in 1959 Saviem acquired all their buses activities and Chausson left that market. In 1954 Chausson developed the AN type, a bus family based on the concept of the monocoque body, an assembly of tubes and ribbed and bent steel plates, welded together, assuring an high rigidity. According to the builder, it was the one that would be able to impose itself in all continents, even intended to be delivered in spare parts to be assembled as a “Meccano”, with easy completion with left or right hand drive, and with identical rear and front faces, pneumatic doors and large side luggage compartments. But the initial version, the ANH, suffered from many early defects: a poor visibility towards the front, an engine with too little power, and poor cooling.

Chausson reacted very quickly, and introduced a new version from 1957: the ANG. The small split windscreen was replaced by a single panoramic one, while an Hispano-Suiza engine, lying under the floor with 150 hp, replaced the previous Hercules engine. The clients were still doubtful and when Chausson sold its bus operation to Saviem the ANG production was stopped, to reappear in 1960 in the form of a new Saviem bus, the SC-5 of 36 seats, using many elements of its previous bodywork but with an engine placed in the front. Less than 300 ANG versions were produced.

The scale model is quite heavy, with a plastic body and metal baseplate. The registration plate is from the Seine-et-Marne department (Île-de-France) and the destination plate says Fontainebleau, famous for its royal castle.

The model is accurately shaped and the red and cream livery is correct, but its symmetrical body is quite ugly. A nice interior is fitted with a well detailed drivers cockpit. Good side windows and wheels are fitted. There are the usual added parts like bumpers, lights, mirrors and wipers (three of them). No apparent differences to the French edition. A correct reproduction of an unsuccessful French bus.

 

No. 54 (no. 43 in the French collection) Ford F600 “Chiva” rural bus 1990 – The mountainous geography of the Andean regions, like Colombia and Ecuador, requires the use of very strong vehicles for their rural public transport network. These are usually built on a truck or bus chassis with an artisan built open wood body with basic fitments and bench like seats. They are characterised by the use of bright colours (usually the yellow, blue, and red colours of the national flags) and elaborate ornamental paint work.

They are fitted with a ladder to a large and strong rack on the roof which is used for carrying people, livestock and merchandise. Locally they are called “chiva” (Spanish for goat) or “escalera” (Spanish for ladder). Chivas were first introduced in the Medellin region in the early 20th century, soon becoming a natural solution to the need of moving both cargo and passengers simultaneously. Through the years their aesthetic approach became a cultural trademark of rural Colombia, evolving into works of folk art. Others regard them as a symbol of underdevelopment. A similar approach, but based on a Willys Jeep, is called “jeepao”.

Sometime you could find these unique buses also in New York, were the “chiva” has developed into a customised bus, carrying party goers around the city. The “chiva” modelled in this collection is based on a Ford “F600” truck chassis, usually with a V8 diesel engine, famous for its endurance and longevity. The first-generation Ford F-Series (light trucks and pickups) was introduced in late 1947 and assembled at sixteen different Ford factories. All F-series were available with optional “Marmon-Herrington All Wheel Drive” until 1959.

 

Their design evolved steadily and successive generations followed each other constantly. According to the year indicated by Hachette this “chiva” should be based on the eighth generation of the Ford F-Series produced from 1986 to 1991, their engine lineup was updated with both the inline-6 and the V8 converted to fuel injection, while the the diesel V8 from International (Navistar) was enlarged from 420 to 444 cubic inches.

The scale model sports the red, light blue and yellow colours of the Colombian flag, and is made with the usual combination of plastic body and metal baseplate. It is a large and fairly heavy model. Near the engine cover an oil bath air filter is correctly reproduced (compulsory because of the dusty tracks), with a vertical silver exhaust at the rear which leads up to the roof, in order to avoid smoke being drawn in to the passenger area. Correctly, it is a very basic bus, but it is enriched by the details: printed artwork, ladder, roof rack, mirrors, and grille. Nice front wheels are fitted. A correct Colombian registration plate is fitted, with the municipality of issuance “Andes” embossed at the bottom of the plate itself.  Again there are no apparent differences to the French edition. A colourful choice, adding a “Spanish American touch” to the collection.


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