Category Archives: Citroen

News from the Continent July/August 2018 – Busch Group

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

All text by, and copyright of, the Author. Photographs supplied by the Manufacturer

Busch Group produce models under three different brands: Busch; ESPEWE, and Mehlhose.  Busch models are of vehicles from Europe and America including some vehicles from the former DDR. ESPEWE covers subjects from the former DDR often using moulds from former East German producers, and Mehlhose agriculture/rural industry related subjects. All the models shown in this article are moulded in plastic to 1:87 scale.

July Releases

Busch

 

40152 American Motorcycle – blue metallic

Note that the term American Motorcycle is used to avoid the need to licence a specific brand.

 

40153 American Motorcycle – red metallic

 

40157 American Motorcycle – grey metallic

 

42840 Tractor Fortschritt (Progress) with iron wheels to compress the silage.

 

49704 Mercedes-Benz R-Class “Fire brigade”

 

51021 Mercedes-Benz Unimog U5023 “Military version”
51900 Land Rover Discovery red (new mould)
51901 Land Rover Discovery green  (new mould)
51902 Land Rover Discovery white (new mould)
51910 Land Rover Discovery “Fire brigade” (new mould)

 

51911 Land Rover Discovery “German Police”  (new mould)
59953 Long timber trailer
ESPEWE Automodelle

Before DeAgostini stopped Atlas Editions launching any new series a venture had been planned with Busch Group to produce a special Series of ESPEWE models liveried as they would have been when in use in the former DDR. This series was cancelled by DeAgostini but Busch now intend to regularly release the models that would have appeared in that series.

95170 IFA W50L Fire engine LF16-TS8 GW-hazardous freight
95235 IFA W50LA Fire engine TLF-16 tank with low-pressure tyres

Mehlhose Modelcars

 

009504 Multicar trailer

August Releases

Busch

41407 Mercdes-Benz 170V “Taxi”

 

48014 Citroen DS 19 “Taxi”

 

51126 Mercedes-Benz Vito “Taxi”

 

41441 Mercedes-Benz 170V Duotone

 

43459 Cadillac 1952 Station wagon “Ambulance”

 

43467 Cadillac 1952 Station wagon “Hearse”

 

43667 Mercedes-Benz C-Class T-model Elegance “Fire brigade”
43818 Mercedes-Benz MK94 1424 fire engine
46718 Volkswagen Hebmüller Cabriolet with closed soft top – brown
46732 Volkswagen Hebmüller Cabriolet with closed soft top – light blue

 

50924 Mercedes-Benz Unimog U430 – dual use tractor (roads and rail road tracks)

 

51123 Mercedes-Benz Vito “German Federal Police”
51247 Barkas box van V 901/2 EMW Service (Eisenach Motor Works)

 

51290 Barkas half-bus V 901/2 VEB Simson bicycle works Suhl
51290 Barkas half-bus V 901/2 VEB Car manufacturer  Horch, Zwickau – The original in 1955 was not decorated with the Horch emblemfor political reasons.
51416 Mercedes-Benz G-Class 1990 “German Border protection – today German Federal Police”

 

51507 IFA G5 1956 “aircraft manufacurer Dresden”
51551 IFA G5 1960 drinking water transporter
52000 Framo V901/2 box van – green/beige
52001 Framo V901/2 box van – blue/white
52002 Framo V901/2 box van – red/beige
ESPEWE Automodelle
95026 HW 80.11 agricultural trailer
95534 IFA L60 ETK box truck “Tractor service”
95535 IFA L60 ETK box truck “German Post”

We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Hachette Italy World Buses Part 17

By Fabrizio Panico

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

Here we look at Autobus from the world – part seventeen (nos. 4951).

After Brossel (see part 12, no. 36), now it is time to explore another Belgian manufacturer, the famous Van Hool, then we have one more Citroën bus and another previously seen German manufacturer  Neoplan. All of them are from the Italian Hachette partwork “Autobus dal mondo”, a collection of eighty 1:43 scale bus models, very similar to the French one “Autobus et autocars du monde”, produced in Bangladesh for Ixo.

No. 49 (no. 38 in the French collection) Van Hool VHF 306 Vistadome 1961 – We have already seen how the Belgian automotive industry is often overlooked, but is a thriving and dynamic one. Bernard Van Hool was born in Koningshooikt (near Anversa) and as a young boy he took a great interest in mechanics, construction and electrics. An active entrepreneur, he started a diamond cutting factory, then a company making other machinery, but the Second World War destroyed everything and he found a new challenge in the transport sector. His ambition was to build bridges and roads, and he needed a vehicle to transport his men to the works, and he decided to rebuilt an old bus with a whole new body. That was the birth of a new challenge: building coach bodies and running a coach tour operating company. He was successful and in 1957 a commercial agreement with Fiat was signed. Van Hool would use Fiat engines and other mechanical components in its vehicles. Van Hool developed from being a small coachbuilder to a manufacturer of integral buses and coaches, known as Van Hool-Fiat (VHF), whilst continuing to also be a renowned coachbuilder. This cooperation was a great success, introducing series production (over 500 coaches by July 1961) and they were exported all over Europe and Africa. In 1981 the cooperation with Fiat was terminated, and Van Hool started to use engines and axles sourced from Caterpillar, Cummins, Mercedes, DAF and MAN and gearboxes from ZF or Voith, or using whole chassis from Volvo and Scania. Since the mid-1980s, Van Hool has also been active on the North American market. In 1990 Van Hool purchased the coachbuilding business of LAG Manufacturing, a Belgian company founded in 1947 by two Geusens brothers that had achieved some success in the United States. Under the new management the product line was expanded. In recent years, Van Hool has been focusing on new propulsion technologies, introducing fuel-cell hybrid buses as well as diesel-electric hybrids.

The VHF 306 is part of the first generation of buses born from the agreement with Fiat : a fast and well made design allowing an early success and the subsequent expansion of the company. The first bus was the VHF 682, the chassis had bent sheet metal beams and the body was welded to it, with a single piece windshield and a very low horizontal radiator grille. The engine was a straight six diesel of 10.7 litres and 150 CV (the same used by the Fiat 682 RN bus), placed horizontally between the axles. Some countries didn’t allow its 12 metres body length, so a new 11 metres bus was developed in 1959 and named VHF 309, while the 682 was renamed 306. Later on they developed an extra-luxury version of the 306, the Vistadome, with an elevated floor for the passengers and a second windshield over the main one.

The scale model is based on the Vistadome version, with the usual combination of a plastic body and a well detailed metal baseplate, sporting a dark red livery.

The registration plate is correct for Belgium (red characters on white background) and very likely also for the year: Belgian plates are owner specific, giving no reliable information about the original registration year of the car to which they are fixed.

The body shape is well reproduced, with nice side windows and tinted ones on the roof, and a separate antenna. As usual there are many separate plastic parts, like side exhaust, lights, mirrors and wipers. The interior is quite basic, with the steering wheel being perhaps a bit too large.

The rear wheels rub on the body though this could be specific to my model). There is no apparent difference to the French edition. A really big model of a large tourist bus typical of the 1960s.

 

 

No. 50 (no. 39 in the French collection) Citroen U 23 Besset 1947 – We have already seen the history of André Citroën and its type 46 (see part nine, no. 25), and how in 1953 the type 55 (part three, no. 9) replaced the type 45 (part two, no. 6). Before the Second World War Citroën developed a homogeneous range of commercial vehicles formed by the types 29 (later 32) and 45, based on truck derived chassis and designed to be bodied as long distance buses, plus a little brother, the light truck type 23 (see part five, no. 15), based on the type 11 and powered by the Traction Avant engine, obviously flipped around in order to drive the rear wheels through a specific gearbox and with an inverted direction of rotation to maintain the direction of rotation of the crank. But its power was quite poor, it gave a maximum speed of only 65 km/h and allowed only 14-20 seats. Presented at the 1935 Paris Motor Show as a light truck, quite basic but very reliable. Many coachbuilders showed their proposals for the 23, like Surirey of Flers (Orne) still active in the field of commercial vehicles, or Besset of Annonay (Ardèche), author of our model. Joseph Besset started as a wooden wheel maker and in 1920 founded an industrial body shop adding coachwork to chassis from Berliet, Bugatti, De Dion Bouton, Delage, Hispano-Suiza, Renault, Rochet-Schneider and Rolland-Pilain. In 1927 he decided to build coaches on truck chassis by Panhard, Citroën and Renault. In 1934 he swapped building wood framed bodywork for lighter and more resistant closed tubular metal structures using electrical welding and patenting the procedure. In 1938, at the International Fair of Lyon, Joseph Besset presented the first European coach with an integral structure with engine at the rear located in a cantilever : the Isobloc (see part 6, no. 17). But in 1951 competition forced Besset to cease his activities. The company changed names several times and became Floirat, then SACA, Saviem, Renault Industrial Vehicles, Irisbus-Iveco and since 2013 Iveco Bus.

This is a weighty but small model compared to the Van Hool. It captures the line well with sympathy for the exaggerated lines of the dark green and light green livery. It is based on a coach preserved by the Orain company of Messac (Ille-et-Villaine), while another one is in the Annonay museum.

Metal body and plastic chassis, with a simulated spare wheel under the chassis. The driver area is well reproduced, with nice passenger seats.

The registration plate is from Ille-et-Villaine, a department located in Brittany, in the northwest of France. A very nice radiator grille is fitted and the front lights are quite fine. As usual there are many added parts, like lights, mirrors, wipers and a large rear ladder to reach the baggage area over the black roof.

There are no apparent differences to the French edition. A very nice model, but perhaps a lighter livery would improve its appearance.

 

No. 51 (no. 40 in the French collection) Neoplan NH 9L 1964 – When we met the 1983 Neoplan NH 22 Skyliner (part nine, no. 27) we saw the Neoplan founder’s eldest son, Albrecht Auwärter, and the Swiss Bob Lee, developed a new coach as part of their dissertation at the Hamburg University. The “Hamburg” bus was unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show in 1961. Both Albrecht and Lee joined Neoplan after graduating from the university : Albrecht took over management of the company, and Bob Lee later became head of Engineering and Design. The NH range (Neoplan Hamburg) was characterised by clear-cut lines with straight edges and large windows, curved over the roof. From the beginning the NH was produced in four different lengths (from 8.16 to 12 metres) named NH 8, NH 9, NH 12 and NH 14 according to the number of rows of seats. All models had rear pneumatic springs and Henschel straight six diesel engines with 115-180 CV. The NH 9 was the most successful, but at the end of the 60s competition forced Neoplan to substitute it with the NH 10, which was able to carry more passengers. The NB range replaced the NH range in 1971 and the Henschel engines were replaced by Daimler Benz ones. Henschel was founded in 1810 in Kassel, producing locomotives among other things, then developed trucks and buses, both before and after the second world war, and diesel engines following the issuing of a  Lanova license, but at the end of the 60s it was absorbed bit by bit by Daimler Benz.

The scale model is shaped accurately and the cream and green livery appears authentic and neatly printed.

 

It is a faithful reproduction of a bus preserved by Will-Reisen, a travel company from Haßfurt, a town in Bavaria, Germany, capital of the Haßberge district.

The body is plastic, as usual, with a metal baseplate with limited details. The silver roof is a separate part. Many more small plastic separate parts are fitted, like exhaust, wipers, mirrors, lights and bumpers, plus a very large antenna in front. The Henschel scripts over the front and rear grilles are rather crude..

A basic interior is fitted and the steering wheel seems to be a bit too large. Nice wheel covers are fitted. There is an accurate German registration plate for the Haßberge district. There are no apparent differences to the French edition. A nice model, quite representative of 1960s technology.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Atlas Dinky 1455 Citroën CX Pallas

By Maz Woolley

All text and photographs by, and copyright of the Author, unless otherwise stated.

Here is another car from the continental ‘Dinky with opening parts‘ series which was boxed but without a certificate by a China based seller on eBay. It may of course appear in the UK Deluxe Dinky series at some point but that is yet to be seen. Dinky 1455 Citroën CX Pallas is from the final years of Dinky France when the models were being made under contract in Spain. Dinky launched the model in 1978 and it only appeared in metallic blue.

As the photograph above shows the later Dinky Toys lost the lovely box artwork which had been such a feature of French Dinky models. Although pictured with yellow headlight lenses the model actually had clear ones fitted. Separate plastic lenses are fitted front and rear  which is stated as one of the model features on the box.

The CX was produced by Citroën from 1974 to 1991 replacing the DS and over a million were made. The Pallas was an upmarket variant of the model. Originally intended to be powered by a three rotor wankel engine the poor fuel economy meant that this was dropped before the cars launch.

One of the features of the model is number plates front and rear which are for Department 75 which is Paris.

The side veiw shows a complete lack of painted items though handles and rubbing strips are moulded in. The tyres have Dunlop moulded in in overscale lettering.

Opening features are limited to the doors and the photograph below shows that they didn’t even correctly replicate the Citroën single spoke steering wheel though the interior has some details moulded in it is not very accurate.

 

All in all a good toy and as usual to 1:43 scale. And a reminder of the way Dinky began to lose ground to other model makers at the time neither keeping up on play features or making models more detailed and accurate.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

News from the Continent April/May 2018 – Norev

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

All text by, and copyright of the Author. Photographs all provided by the manufacturer.

This article covers two sets of news from NOREV. Unless otherwise stated all models are diecast in China for France.

April 2018

1:18 Scale

181622 Citroen Dyane 6 1977 “Caban”

 

181650 Citroen C4 Cactus 2014 – Hello Yellow & Black Airbump

 

181651 Citroen C4 Cactus 2014 – Pearl White & Chocolate Airbump

 

181660 Citroen C4 Cactus 2018 – Emeraude Blue & White deco

 

183455 Mercedes-Benz 450 SEL 6,9 saloon 1976 – green metallic This model sold out on pre-orders before even being released to the shops.

 

184881 Peugeot 309 Gti16 1991 – Miami blue

 

185242 Renault 4 Parisienne 1964 – black & red

 

185225 Renault Megane R.S. 2017 – Tonic orange

1:43 Scale

 

820313 DKW 3=6 Coupe 1958 – black

1:18 Scale MAXIJET

 

182056A Motobecane AV 65 1965 – blue

 

Peugeot 103 L 1972 – Orange

Minijet “3 inches” – made to fit box

 

310611 Citroen C3 2016 – Red & Black

 

310901 Renault Megane RS 2017 – Sirius yellow

 

310903 Renault Megane RS 2017 – Orange

May 2018 Announcements ‘Norev stay in the Race !’

1:18 Scale

 

181630 Citroen C3 WRC 2017 – Official Presentation Version

 

182719 Ford Capri Mk. III 2,8 Injection 1982 – chrystal green metallic

 

183452 Mercedes-AMG GT R 2018 – red

 

183635 Opel Manta A 1970 – Lemon green metallic

 

185226 Renault Megane R.S. 2017 – Sirius yellow

 

Scale 1:43

 

830027 Audi 80 quattro saloon 1985 – blue metallic

 

820302 Dkw f89 Delivery van “German Post”

 

517961 Renault Trezor Salon de Paris 2010

 

840095 Volkswagen Scirocco GT 1981 – Anthracite grey metallic

1:18 Scale MAXIJET

 

182065A Solex 1966 – black


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

News from the Continent Apr/May 2018 – Busch Group

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

All text by, and copyright of the Author. Photographs provided by the Manufacturer.

This article looks at the latest releases moulded to 1:87 scale by Busch and its related brands.

 

41922 Citroen HY Mobile beehive

 

44944 Horse transport trailer – black

 

44962 Tabbert caravan “Soccer-Fan”

 

46219 Smart Fortwo Coupe 2012 “Soccer-Fan”

 

48494 Piaggio Ape 50 “MB” building site staff car

 

50367 Land Rover Defender Camel Trophy 1989 “The winning car”

 

50368 Land Rover Defender “Scholpp Crane Service”

 

51258 Framo Bus V901/2 Factory fire engine “Rubber Works Waltershausen DDR”

Barkas Collecting Series

 

51288 Barkas half-bus V901/2 – Nr.1 – VEB Fahrzeugwerk Waltershausen Customer service vehicle 1957

 

51289 Barkas Half-bus V901/2 – Nr. 2 – Möwe Bicycles Mühlhausen. Customer service vehicle of the bicycle manufacturer 1957

 

51811 Robur Garant K30 box van – laundry delivery van (new mould)

 

51812 Robur Garant K 30 box van “60 Years of Busch-Toys” 60 years of quality” – Limited Edition for the company anniversary.

 

51860 Robur Garant K 30 Kombi-van “Energy supplier Halle” (new mould)

 

54902 STA trailer “Oil incident” Guben

 

54903 STA trailer Fire brigade

 

59952 Trailer loaded with motorboat “German Police”

 

59956 Heavy duty grubber B 365 A02

DreiKa Modelcars

 

94200 Goliath Express 1100 pick up – blue

 

94201 Goliath Express 1100 pick up – dark green

 

94202 Goliath Express 1100 pick up – wine red

 

94220 Goliath Express 1100 pick up “Goliath Works” limited edition of 500 pieces

Mehlhose Modelcars

 

210004701 Tractor RS09 – loading arm with shovel – green

 

210006900 Tractor Famulus with trailer – red

 

210007100 Tractor Famulus with trailer – blue


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Atlas Presidential Citroën

By Maz Woolley

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

General de Gaulle favoured Citroën cars following the abortive attempt to assassinate him in 1962 when the ability of the Citroën hydro-pneumatic suspension to keep the car under control and driveable even with tyres shot out  is said to have saved his life. Rather than start being driven in armoured cars he kept using Citroën cars and ordered a presidential limousine in 1962. It is said his only requirement was that it was longer than John F. Kennedy’s Lincolns! 

Citroën turned to Henri Chapron to carry out the specialist bodywork and it took six years before the public saw the car in 1968. It was 6.53 meters in length and 1.96 meters high.  Although based on a DS21 the car is different from almost any angle whilst maintaining a DS family look.

The designers were Opron and Dargent and they went to town with gold badging and two tone grey finish. Inside the car they fitted large areas of woodwork in curved shapes even in front of the driver. The car was trimmed in pale leather throughout. A bar, a refrigerator, reading lights and a foldable desk are also part of the on-board equipment.

Powered by a DS21 engine of 2.1 litres it had manual transmission and a modified cooling system to allow the vehicle to run at low speed during official visits. A maximum speed of around 130 Kph is said to be achievable.

Delivered to the Elysee in 1968, this presidential DS was used only rarely. It is said that General de Gaulle only went in it three times as he disliked the separation from the driver with whom he liked chatting. Georges Pompidou scarcely used it either. The car is now owned by Citroën Heritage.

The Atlas model is made in China to 1:43 scale in diecast metal with a plastic base. It was made by Ixo for Atlas I believe. It is one of a series of presidential cars sold on subscription in many continental countries but not in the UK. However this model has been sold by Atlas to third parties and has even been seen on eBay shipping from China.

The model is excellently modelled with a splendid interior including the huge sweeping division glass as well as the additional vents modelled behind the rear window. The steering wheel and gear change are nicely modelled and the sweeping instrument panel moulded in some detail though lacking printed instruments.

The model captures the size and stance of the car well with the chromed wheels well reproduced as well as gold badges on C pillars, shield shape wing markings. There is a small aerial modelled in down position, an emblem inserted into the bonnet, super side mouldings, and bumpers with the correct number plates printed on. To the rear the chrome rear panel and inset lights are well captured. Even the door handle are small inserted parts. The yellow inset front lights under their covers are worthy of a much more expensive model.

All in all an impressive model of an impressive car.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Majorette Limited Edition

By Maz Woolley

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

Majorette are part of the SImba-Dickie group makers of Schuco and many other brands. Majorette toys are made to fit in the box like Matchbox or Hot Wheels and are aimed at the same customers. The current limited edition range caught my eye recently and it contains some nice models of cars in a mildy custom form.

Both models shown below are from Series 2 of the Limited Edition range which includes:

  • Audi R8
  • Chevrolet Camaro
  • Citroën DS4
  • Ford Mustang
  • Lamborghini Aventador
  • Mercedes-Benz SLS
  • Mini Cooper
  • Porsche GT3 911
  • VW Golf VII GTI
#3 Citroën DS4 1:64

The DS range was created by Citroën to use its existing chassis to create distinctive premium cars to compete with Mini, Alfa Romeo and BMW. The DS4 was based on the C4 its competitor to the Focus and Golf.

The slightly wild colours on this model complement the DS which is often painted in strong colours and has a range of eye catching features. Here the rims are fitted with a nice reflective line echoing the paint work which is a matt type finish.

The model has neatly printed details, and unusual for a budget range separate clear light lenses on the front. A simple black interior has some details moulded in and the DS badging is neatly printed.

 

#7 Mini Cooper 1:57

Again we have a matt effect paint and some eye catching orange graphics including “Go faster” orange stripes. The Mini and Cooper badging is nicely printed albeit a bit over scale.

The front lights are again separate plastic items though blacked out to fit the theme as are the windows making the car far from street legal in the UK. The wheels with orange rim are again nice wild alloy replicas.

 

Although clearly made as toys both these cars have an appeal and look good on the shelf.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Atlas Dinky Deluxe – #500 Citroën 2 CV 6

By Maz Woolley

All photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

Another Atlas Dinky model has arrived in the Deluxe series issued in the UK. It is another French Dinky this time #500 1966 Citroën 2CV 6. This is another model that started as French made in 1967 and ended its life being made in Spain for Dinky after 1974. Atlas has replicated the French edition which was according to them available in pale grey or blue though some listings also claim it was made in beige. When production transferred to Spain the latest jaunty orange colour became available as well as the later square lights.

The model features the roof replicated in its first, rolled back, position which was great fun in sunny weather. The photograph also shows the way that the sprung fabric seats on metal tubed frames were used. In the Author’s memory these may have been simple but were very comfortable too!

The model has jewelled headlights as another “extra” over the earlier 2 CV model in the range as well as neatly modelled grey wheels with special hubs similar to those on the real car and tyres with Dunlop marked on them.

One curiosity is the silver panel below the front grill. This is actually the location of the number plate so a black box would have been nicer.

The rear is rather plain and the rear lights still a simple red cluster though the 2CV 6 was to gain larger rear lights from the Ami in 1970. Another mystery is the yellow panel as the French still used white/Silver on black plates in 1966.

The side view shows the fact that this update of the 2CV had conventionally hinged front doors.  The real car had side windows in two halves with the lower part being a flap that lifted upwards. The original Dinky didn’t have this moulded or marked in and the Atlas copies the original.

The final photograph shows the features that make this a Deluxe model, the open roof and the opening bonnet. Quite a nicely replicated engine with the inbound brakes clearly visible. If my memory serves the engine was actually all dull alloys and seemed incredibly low down and small.

Rather a nice model of a distinctive vehicle but one wonders how many of the collectors will remain with this series as there seems to be no prospect of any more UK Dinkies and even the Ford Galaxie 500 we were promised in the promotional literature has not been seen.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Small French cars from Universal Hobbies

By Maz Woolley

All photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

Universal Hobbies seem to be primarily known today for the production of scale models of Agricultural and Construction machinery. But in the past they were active in making models to be used in partwork series, many in the James Bond series were from UH as were many 1:43 scale French partwork models. Today their 1:43 scale tractors have been used in a recent tractors partwork as well as sold in UH Packaging They also make larger tractors in 1:32 scale to compete with Britains and others.

This article is the start of a short series looking back at models UH made to 1:87 scale which were included in a French partwork: The Golden Age of French Cars which was produced in about 2009. Partworks are traditionally based upon 1:43 scale models which  are large enough for the public to see them as worthy of the cover price and not to bulky for the newstrade and delivery firms to cope with. So this partwork with a cover case holding two 1:87 models of different versions of the same car was a novelty. Having two cars did address the issue of perceived value but perhaps it was not a success as it has not been repeated and the models are still available new in France without the magazine that once came with them.

These models were all diecast in metal in China for France and are fitted with a nice turning key type fixing that allows them to be easily removed from the case for display. The first models from this series that I will look at are the classic  Citroën Tractions.

Citroën Traction 7A 1934

 

The original Traction Avant was a small saloon car powered by a 1,300cc engine. It was designated 7A  and about 7,000 were made of this model with only one wiper and where all luggage had to be loaded  from the inside as there was no opening boot. The front doors were front hinged.

The model captures a car shown on the Internet in a car museum very well though that like that car the model has two wipers. Maybe that was an option or was fitted to some of the last 7As to be produced. The two tone grey and black colours are authentic and the grille and horns has been very well reproduced as have all the bonnet side fitments. The wheels are quite simple but so were the originals with a very small silver coloured hub cap contrasting to black wheel and tyre.

The rear is neatly finished with the two filler caps fitted until 1935 moulded in and highlighted in silver. The spare tyre cover is neatly painted in black with the small silver centre cap printed on. The rear lights are printed well capturing the slightly oval shape they had well.

Citroën Traction 11 légère FFI 1944

 

The 11 was built in two versions and the one that UH have modelled here is the 11BL (“légère”, or “light”), which was the same size as the 7 CV. Whilst it was similar to the 7A there were actually quite a few differences which means that UH had to produce two different castings. In 1935 the front grille was part painted and not entirely plated and the headlight covers were restyled. The changes at the back were more practical and involved an opening boot lid, re-positioned rear number plate and a single fuel filler cap. In 1936 the suspension was revised and rack and pinion steering fitted.

The UH model incorporates a new front bumper, and a  modified grille and wheels. The painting is the markings of the Free French who took over France as the allied invasion of Europe pushed the Nazis out of France. The 11 in this form has been modelled by others including Solido in 1:18 scale and Edicola, as well as UH, in 1:43 scale.

The modifications to the rear are all fully incorporated including the boot opening lines and handles and the relocated number plate.

Whilst the models in this series are not as finely moulded or detailed as Brekina or Herpa they are quite acceptable perhaps on a  par with an average Oxford Diecast 1:76 scale model.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Atlas Germany Ambulance Collection – Part Six

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

All photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

Here are two more issues in the Ambulance cars series. They are to 1:43 scale 1:43

Volkswagen Transporter T1b Krankenwagen – 7 495 112

The Volkswagen Transporter T1a was launched in 1959, series production started on 8th March 1950 with ten vehicles per day. The first “factory made” Ambulance left the assembly line on 13th December 1951. It was developed jointly by the Volkswagen Works, the German Ambulance Service and the German Red Cross.

For the 1960 model year the transporters received “wart-shaped” indicators, which were changed two years later into bull´s eye shapes. This followed the changes to the Beetle. So the miniature is a vehicle from 1962. The body is an accurate shape with good paint finish and several small components moulded separately and inserted.

Front doors are printed with “German Red Cross – Readiness Hage”,. The registration plates are from region of Aurich in the North-West of Germany. The baseplate shows no special detail, except the exhaust system.

 

Citroen C25 Ambulance Heuliez – 7 495 113

According to the motto “One for All”, the manufacturers Alfa Romeo, Fiat, Citroen, Peugeot and Talbot offered in 1982 a van on the same platform. Best known was the Fiat Ducato, the most versatile one the Citroen C25. The C25 was built from January 1982 up to August 1990.

Short after the launch of the C25, the coachwork company Heuliez developed an ambulance car on its base. The roomy van offered space for the comprehensive equipment for the medical emergency service. The miniature comes as vehicle of the SAMU, Service dÁide Medicale Urgente.

The original vehicle was based in Rouen, department 76 Seine-Maritime, in North-West of France. The miniature is accurately shaped, well painted and printed with a livery that is true to the original. Some small parts are inserted separately like lights, aerials, and door mirrors which adds to the accuracy of the model.   A number of parts was separate inserted. The baseplate has basic details.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.