Category Archives: Austin

Maestro Model in 3D

By Maz Woolley

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

3D printed parts are widely used for prototyping work by model makers and artisan railway scenics producers have developed a lot of 3D printed items to sell over the last few years. Bollards, speed bumps, security fencing and items like that are being made by several established and growing scenics producers like Scale Model Scenery and Shedring Railway. Of late Shedring has started to make vehicle fitments like lifting equipment for lorries and even whole vehicles for use in dioramas like the site dumper shown below.

Photograph by, and copyright of, Shedring Railways

An alternative way for 3D designers to get their products to the public is a company called Shapeways who are commercial 3D printers who run a site where designers can upload their designs and if anyone buys the item Shapeways print it and send it to the customer and pay the designer a royalty. This company appears to run both a US and a European printing operation so the site attracts designs posted from both sides of the Atlantic and usefully an American design can be printed in Europe for European customers. Their site contains many items for diorama makers and has a few models in 1:43, but more in HO (1:87), OO (1:76) and even N (1:148 and 1:160) scales. Sometimes the same model is available in multiple scales. Designs include scenic items, railway engine bodies and fitments to use as transkits on commercial chassis. More importantly for car and vehicle model collectors there are also some lorries, vans and cars available. A selection of these are shown below. Please note that most illustrations on the Shapeways site have been generated from the digital data and are not photographs of the actual product that you will get.

Bedford TJ design by coasters120 on Shapeways

The Bedford TJ (thanks to Brendan Leach for correcting my error in calling it a TK) flatbed shown above is to 1:76 and looks like a one piece print. It is an interesting model as there are currently few TJ models.

Bedford OL by Transport Models on Shapeways

1:43 scale models are few and far between but provide interesting variants which can often be mixed with bodies and wheel sets off commercial models. The few 1:43 scale models seem to be made of a greater number of parts. The cost of the 1:43 scale models when additional parts needed to finish them off are taken into account are considerably dearer than Oxford Diecast trucks.

MIni Estate by Digitawn on Shapeways

This is a typical OO 1:76 scale model from the Shapeways site. It produced as a solid model with separate wheels. In addition to Minis there are also Transits and other Fords available on the site. The Mini model is certainly more accurate than many ready made models are.

Mercury Montego by Madaboutcars on Shapeways

The Mercury model shown is a digital generation of a 1:87 scale model. It is one of many US prototypes designed by Madaboutcars. All the US models I have seen are solid and  in either 1:43, 1:87 or Continental N scale of 1:160.

The model that I would like to look at in detail today is a 1:76 scale Austin Maestro designed by Alternative Model Railways which is available in 1:87, 1:76, and 1:148 scales. The 1:76 is available with the metal bumper or the plastic bumper, the plastic bumper version being shown here. A 1:76 scale van is also available. Shapeways can print with a wide range of plastics but model designers restrict the materials that can be used for the model and the Maestro can only be purchased made of a high quality plastic which makes the kit quite expensive, it costs nearly as much as four 1:76 Oxford Diecasts or two of the cheaper John Day Vehicle Scenics kits. The justification for the use of the expensive matte translucent plastic is that it shows fine and intricate details better.

The Austin Maestro was codenamed LM10 and was a five-door hatchback produced at Cowley from 1982 to 1987 by British Leyland, and from 1988 until 1994 by Rover Group. It went on to be produced in China until 2007 using a Toyota engine. It shared its platform with the MG derivatives as well as the Montego saloon.  It replaced both the Maxi and the Allegro and was fitted with engines from 1.3 to 2.0 litres.

Models of later Leyland, and Rover group, vehicles are scarce with the only other Maestro models known to me being the contemporary Scalextric and Corgi models. I know of no Montego model or models of the next generation Rover 200, 400, and 600 series cars. These once common cars have all but vanished from the roads now but there are many who remember driving them or as their parents or grandparents car. This generation of UK made vehicles are an opportunity for a small scale producer to fill if Oxford do not do so.

The model supplied is much like the digital illustration below though transluscent. Parts are printed and placed into protective plastic bags with different parts in different bags. As the illustration shows there is no glazing supplied.

Alternative Model Railways Maestro Kit as shown on Shapeways.

Unusually the designer also has a simple assembly diagram on the web site something that few others seem to both with.

Alternative Model Railways Maestro Assembly schematic on Shapeways

So what was it like making this kit? The first thing to note is that it all fits together quite snugly. The surface finish on the roof and in other areas does show the printing artifacts with the roof in particular having distinct contours. In 1:76 scale or smaller this is not too obvious but in 1:43 it may be a considerable disadvantage.  The kit was very crisply printed and I have few criticisms of the accuracy and quality. As my modelling skills are basic the defects in appearance are mainly from my poor finishing.

The side view of the car has been very well caught. The 3D printing of the side strips, wheels arches and the side ‘scallop’ are all very accurate. As are the window frames, door handles and fuel cap. The very finely printed detail presents a challenge to the average kit maker as many kit designers will make details slightly over scale to make the easier to pick out. This is not the case here so painting side strips and window surrounds proved challenging.

The front view is good though there were some artefacts in the grilles particularly below the bumper. But overall quite an accurate reflection of the fairly plain Maestro front end. No attempt is made to model screen wipers.

At the rear the modelling is simple and no attempt at wiper is made, It is however quite a good shape. The rear lights are supplied as transluscent plastic which has to be painted and fitted into slots. The shape and fit are good but painting them is difficult to this size and a decal to overlay or making them in coloured plastic might be a better solution.

The model’s stance is good and the overall shape excellent. It would have been better if a vacform had been supplied as glazing it is a real challenge. My thanks to Daryle at John Day Vehicle Scenics for giving me some vacforms for lorry cabs to cut down for the front and rear screens which has worked quite well. The side windows have been been glazed using Kristal Klear and because of the size of the gaps it has not created the nice flat surface I had hoped for though it is flush glazed which is the effect I wanted.

Another view of the car shows that the wheels are well finished with the wheel cover often seen on the Maestro in body colour. Again fine rims made painting difficult as a more pronounced rim makes it easier to paint the tyre correctly.

Another unusual model to add to the collection, and an introduction to making 3D printed models. My personal feeling is that, at present, the high cost of models on Shapeways means that it is only really worth considering for models of vehicles that you cannot get in any other way like this Maestro. Perhaps if Shapeways could find a way of making vacforms and reducing cost then they might become more popular.


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Amateur Building #2 – being a reconstruction of GFCC’s Austin 7 of 1930

By David Holcombe

Unless otherwise stated all text and photographs are copyright of the Author.

When Maz reviewed this little fellow in all its 1:43 glory (MAR Online, 31 Dec. ’17), he concluded that it “.. really would benefit from taking the model apart and treating it like a kit.” That’s when I decided it was time to find one for myself.

I acquired mine a couple of weeks ago (the postage from China was far more than I paid for the model); I had only pictures with which to compare, for I have never seen an Austin 7. But surely the staid English motorists of 1930 would not have used this green! So I turned to my long-suffering internet pals on Forum 43 and braced myself. Comments flowed, “Needs window glazing,” “like the postal slot in brass,” and from Master John Roberts, “different colour?”. One collector even posted his hot rod version. Horrors!

First, I made an attempt at just cleaning it up by touching the door handles and hub caps with silver/chrome, and adding a bit of pin striping. It still didn’t work. That green was just too green. So, I started with the conclusions of Maz and implemented the others as best as I could (where I agreed with them, anyhow). The model has two basic parts of die cast metal, being the cabin and the fenders/subframe. The rest, including a well-formed undercarriage, is plastic. The roof is also plastic, somewhat simplified. It appeared that the Austin was held together by two minute screws, but after removing them and the undercarriage, I found a third. Very small tabs, all plastic, tended to break as their glue gave way; but construction was so simple that they went back together rather easily.

The window glazing was relatively easy, working from the inside, as the metal of the cabin is quite nicely finished. That is, until I attempted the windshield (that’s “windscreen” in the UK). Sorry if a smear shows, but even my third attempt was faulty. I applied a light grey on the seats to ease all that black, and even picked out a little of the minimal dashboard. One of the guys who hangs around my models volunteered to drive, and he is still there.

Final touch-up was simple, as that’s the term for the Austin 7. My chosen dark red was advised by John Roberts, even though I found many, many shades of red in restored Austins. Chrome is only a touch here and there, and I had fun adding the pin stripe for a black on red contrast. That’s not paint; it’s a trimmed slice of the plastic striping I applied on my 1:1 PT Cruiser about 15 years ago. Never throw away something that you might need in the future. And, yes, I used a brass/golden tint on the postal slot. (I wonder if that is the correct term. Oh well, I like it and it seems to fit.)

If all this seems a lot of fuss over the very small car, then I suggest one of the several Austin 7 models that have been produced over the years. Oxford, I think, has one still in production. But none of them have just quite the same features as mine. (Big Smile!)

Picture from unknown source.

 

The 1:1 Austin 7 (sometimes referred to as the Austin Seven)

This is how it arrived, well packed but with no pretty box.

So I attempted a little work, but it still was too green! Time to “do a Maz!”

And so, we took it apart. And then I had fun!

And here it is now, on the streets of London, c. 1930. Okay, this driver found some pavement.

 

Here is how it looked in comparison to its English kin. That’s a Western Model’s version of the 1926 Rolls Royce Phantom 1 Doctor’s Coupe. And it’s a 2-passenger car. The Austin 7 was designed to handle four.

 

Sometimes it’s fun to take something apart and put it back together. . . kind of.

Yes these are both to 1:43 scale!


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Cult Models for 2018

By Maz Woolley

All photographs provided by the manufacturer and may be prototypes subject to refinement and changes.

Cult Models has a past history of making 1:18 scale models of classic British cars and four more are expected in the first half of 2018. These models are made in China for Cult.

Cult have been known to offer some of the more reasonably priced 1:18 scale models in the past but the price has risen steadily over the last year or so making each model a significant investment for collectors.

Land-Rover Discovery Mark I metallic red 1989

This model of an early Land Rover Discovery with the graphics printed on should prove popular. The wheels seem to be very accurate and the large areas of matt black also seem well printed.


Austin 1100 Glider yellow 1969

The car is a four door illustrated with right hand drive and the correct grille bars for the 1100. I don’t believe that the name “Glider” was ever used on a UK car, though looking at the web shows it was used and perhaps in the Netherlands as most of the references using this name seem to be Dutch.

The model seems to capture the shape well and though the colour is certainly authentic the Author wishes they had done it in another colour.


Sunbeam Supreme MKIII white/maroon 1954

From 1953 the former Sunbeam -Talbot 90 was marketed by Rootes Group as the Sunbeam Mark III. On the radiator shell instead of “Sunbeam Talbot” used on previous versions “Sunbeam Supreme” was to be seen.

This model captures the cars shape well and again the wheels seem to be neatly represented as does the chrome belt line.


Triumph Spitfire MKII blue

A popular vehicle for modelling and one that is available in almost every scale commonly available. The Cult model seems to be a good replica of the real thing. The early Spitfire front and rear end is clearly captured as are the simple painted steel wheels and chrome hubcaps.


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Dinky Small Auto Set

by Terry Hardgrave

The 1953 US Dinky Toys catalog pictures a small red racing car that many collectors might not have seen before.

In fact there are other cars in a little set. These were originally introduced in 1936 and called the Small Auto Set, and numbered 35a, 35b, 35c, and 35d. They were tiny, only a little over 1″ long, and made to OO scale. All of these were discontinued in 1941, due to the war, then re-introduced in 1946.

35a is called the Saloon Car and has the appearance of an early Triumph. It was made until 1952. 35b is the Midget Car Racer and is modeled after an MG Type R race car, and was the longest made, being deleted in 1957. 35c is the MG Sports Car and based on the MG Midget or Type P. This was deleted in 1952.  35d is the Austin 7 car, modeled on the Austin 7 Opal 2-seat touring car. One source says it was deleted in 1948, but it appears in the 1951 US Dinky Toys catalog.

The pre-war 35d models only came with a wire windscreen … postwar without. My example,shown below on the right, is the only pre-war model of this set that I have, and it also shows the pre-war style white tires and thinner axles.

The price lists from the early 1950’s catalogs show these as being priced at $0.35 each, and they always came in trade boxes of 6.
Here is another photo of this little, very antiquated set of tiny Dinky cars!


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Silas Austin Maxi 1750HL

By Maz Woolley

All photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

The Austin Maxi was one of the last cars developed before BMC became British Leyland and was one of the last to have input from Alex Issigonis. It replaced the long in the tooth Austin Cambridge and was followed by the Maestro. A five door hatchback with lots of space it was functional like the Mini and 1100/1300 and this restricted showroom appeal compared to the jazzed up interiors from Ford, Vauxhall and Chrysler.  The 1750HL was a second generation car and had a larger engine and an improved five speed gearbox. Unfortunately the build quality was not good with rust and failure of electrical components frequent.  My wife’s first car was a 1750HL Maxi and  yes it rusted, things  like windscreen wiper boxes broke, internal switchgear failed, and the thinner wiring under the bonnet broke so often that I carried a crimping kit  in the car to fix it. But it was otherwise a comfortable, quiet and relaxing car to cruise in with lots of space for luggage and friends. It should remembered that cars from its competitors were often no more reliable or free from rust.

The Maxi has not been modelled very often. The only contemporary model that I am aware of was an Airfix kit to 1:32 scale. Since then a white metal model has been made but it was not a very good representation. Then more recently Silas made it in Resin. The 1500 was initially sold a couple of years ago and now a new batch of the 1500 and some 1750HLs are available. Though as only one hundred are made in each colour they will no doubt sell out quickly. The 1750 is available in  Harvest Gold, Teal Blue (as photographed), and Tartan Red.

The Silas model has a good profile but this is let down a little by the very flat tops and bottoms of the PE chrome round the windows which need to be slightly more curved to fit the apertures properly particularly at the top,

This front three-quarter view shows the model at its best.

The rear is not quite so good with a  slight twist to the resin body, the number plate printed slightly at an angle, and the PE window surround kinked at the bottom. The lights and bumper are nicely modelled.

A good front end with Grille and badging well modelled and the detail on the 1750 badge is extremely fine.

Another picture that shows the slightly distorted rear window surround. The interior is all in black with steering wheel part picked out in silver. I would have preferred the dash to be in the simulated wood finish that our car had.

The tiny wipers seem a little to delicate to me. I seem to rememeber them as quite substantial assemblies. But maybe that is just because they stuck across the screen so often!

The wheels are slightly shiny and would have benefited from some black detailing but are otherwise quite good.

Finally a quick look at the very simple base.

Silas have made a good attempt at this rarely modelled car, though it is not as good as their Rapier or Herald but better than their Hunter. I am glad to have this model as I will be very surprised if we see it modelled in diecast metal by Corgi, Oxford, or even Ixo/PCT.


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Oxford Diecast Austin Seven Ruby

By Maz Woolley

All photographs by, and copyright of, the Author except where otherwise stated.

The model shown here is the second release of the Austin Seven Ruby from Oxford Diecast.  This follows the previous release in various colours of the original Austin 7.

In August 1934 the ‘7’ was re-styled with the saloon version being called the ‘Ruby’.  The new model was recognisable by the longer bonnet and cowled radiator, whilst the tail was slightly downswept with the spare wheel enclosed by a metal cover, this item also concealing a folding luggage grid. These changes brought the styling of Austin’s smallest car in line with the larger ones
The Oxford model captures the Ruby’s diminutive size and its curved shape very well. And the colour split is very nicely achieved.

From the front the Austin badging has been well printed though the Austin badge is just a silver print with no red colour applied.  The badging on the radiator is well done but the silver inset around the grille is a little overscale. The headlights are lovely units with clear plastic lenses.

The picture above shows how well the car’s profile has been captured and the suitcase on the luggage rack is a nice plastic casting.

Another view of the case shows the printed straps. The number plates are nicely printed as are handles and catches all round the car.

The roof has a nicely printed fabric section and the interior has a nicely finished dashboard with instruments printed a neat steering wheel, moulded door cards and nicely matt finished seats.

On the down side I am afraid that the wheels do not match the quality of the rest of the model. Setting aside the fact that the “wire” outer has fallen off one wheel whilst handling, the rear wheels do not turn without binding on the body. But the worst feature is the way that they look. Oxfords technique for “faux wires” has looked OK on many previous models but it really lets this one down. Somehow the plastic nature of the outer wires is obvious and the clear disk is cloudy and stops the inner disk showing through, though on some wheels the inner wires are not properly fitted into the centre either. This is a real shame as it stops this from being an excellent model when it so easily could be.


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Anonymous Alloy models from China

By Maz Woolley

 

Every now and again eBay throws up some curiosities as we have seen with the recent articles on GFCC Jaguar and Pontiac models in MAR Online. Indeed GFCC has come up with another US model recently, a Studebaker Speedster Coupé , which the Author has ordered and will review when it arrives. A photograph from the eBay listing is shown below.

 

At the moment there are a number of sellers of models described as “alloy classic models” which do not appear to have originated from Part Works or other known model ranges . Four seem to be available and photographs from eBay listings are shown below.

 

Austin Seven


Skoda Hispano


 

Rolls Royce Silver Ghost


 

Ford Model T


 

All the models appeared to be finished in a “Yesteryear” style with no window glazing but as the models were being offered very cheaply with no postage charges I decided to buy the Austin Seven to see what it was like.

The model is marked C.I.L. on the base but I seem to be unable to find any details of this company on the web. If readers have any details please let me know. As I expected the model is like a later “Model of Yesteryear“. It has a plastic roof but diecast body.

The wheels are one piece plastic affairs but as can be seen they have excellent spokes and rims and if they had been fitted with rubber tyres I would rate them as better than the wheels on Oxford’s equivalent model. The front lights are picked out but the rear ones though moulded in are not printed.

The body casting has been neatly detailed with handles, flaps and coachwork lines but none are printed. Underneath the chassis is made in plastic in some detail.  All in all this is quite a nice basic model but the one thing that lets it down is the paintwork this is far from smooth and the model really would benefit from taking the model apart and treating it like a kit.


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Wolseley 2200 Conversion

By John Quilter

Photographs by, and copyright of, the Author. They can be seen below the text.

So what do you do when you end up with a duplicate model of one you already have? A while back a fellow model club member, who only works with 1:24th scale models, gave me a Heller plastic kit of an Austin Princess 2000. So what to do with this since I had already built a stock Princess 2000? Checking the British Leyland product range circa 1975 I found that there was a Wolseley version, the Wolseley 2200 of the controversial Harris Mann wedge design era that included the Triumph TR7.

The only real noticeable differences between the Princess and 2200 were the shape of the bonnet and a trapezoidal grill. So I decided to modify this kit into a Wolseley by adding a bulge to the bonnet and a modified grill. A layer of styrene plastic to the bonnet and a grill made from a piece of solder bent to shape made the conversion possible. Google images showed that there was a gold colour offered in 1975 with a tan interior. This is a nice addition to my Wolseley shelf, and if I am correct, it was the last BLMC vehicle badged as a Wolseley before the marque faded into obscurity.


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Ace Model Cars (Australia) An update

By Graeme Ogg

Back in 2014 I posted a piece about Ace Model Cars, from whom I had just bought a nice resin model of a 1959 Ford Fairlane 500.

They were promising one or two other things in the pipeline but then I heard no more. So I got in touch with them recently and thought you might like an update on some of their current or forthcoming items. (Photos reproduced with their permission – some images may be changed on the website to show final production versions).

Needless to say, I am not acting as any kind of agent or touting for business on their behalf, but I know some of you are interested in Australian models (including Aussie versions of U.S. cars), and it isn’t a site you might come across in casual browsing.

There was a promise of an estate (wagon) version of the ’59 Ford, but apparently the man behind Ace Models, Tony Hanna, wasn’t happy with how it came out so it is still a work in progress, although now that Motorhead Models have done one in their Genuine Ford Parts” series, that could affect sales of the Ace version if/when it appears.

Also promised was a ’59 Dodge Custom Royal 4 door sedan. The first attempt at that didn’t satisfy him either so it has been re-worked and production is not too far away now.

No mention of the fate of the proposed 1960 Dodge Phoenix, but the nice (though imperfect) Neo model may have discouraged that idea.

An interesting Australian model that is almost ready for sale, needing just a few minor corrections, is the 1975 Ford Landau, a fastback coupé based on the Ford XA Falcon but with the front end from the Ford Fairlane LTD (which was a stretched Falcon). It will be offered in Port Wine (dark maroon), Grecian Gold, Ivy Green and Metallic Blue.

Also available is a ’62 Falcon XL in red, white over red, white over green, plain white and black.

Another U.S./Australian model now available is a 1966 Chevy Nova, with street versions in silver or red and three racing versions. I’m not enough of a Chevy man to know how it compares with the U.S. version but I believe that, like the Falcons, the Australian cars were imported CKD and re-trimmed to Australian specification,

A more typically Australian item is a Ford BA 1 ton flatbed pickup in metallic purple, metallic blue, orange or metallic green.

And a British/Australian mongrel currently on offer is an Austin A40 Hi-Lite ute in beige or light green. To the best of my knowledge Austin never offered this pickup on home territory, but the Ozzies love making ute versions of everything, Seems to be cultural thing.

All these models are resin, and prices are comparable with Trax so I guess that by the time you add shipping from the other side of the world, you would have to have a fairly specific interest in these niche models before parting with your money. But it’s nice to see things a little bit out of the mainstream.

If you want to take a look at these and other models on offer from Ace, the website is http://acemodelcars.com/index.php?route=common/home


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Corgi July to December 2017

By Maz Woolley

All pictures used to illustrate this article are from Corgi’s web site. Most are mock ups or 3D renderings rather than examples of the final models. 

Business Background

I make no apologies for starting this article with news about the Hornby Hobbies business as June is not only when they announce the second half models but it is also their financial year end.

Already this year we have seen the company drop its plans to build a visitor centre to replace the one lost when they sold their headquarters site. This was followed in April by a major shareholder,  New Pistoia Income Limited, calling for the removal of Roger Canham the Executive Chairman. Before the Annual Results New Pistoia decided to cut their losses and sold the 20% they held in Hornby hobbies for 32 pence a share to Phoenix Asset Management Partners the biggest shareholder who now have 55% and have now to offer to buy any other shareholders shares at 32 pence.

Whilst all this upheaval took place the annual results were announced and the CEO/Chairman Roger Canham’s resignation as well. A growing underlying pre-tax loss of over six million pounds was widely reported in the Financial columns. Whilst their cash situation has significantly improved this will still leave them little capital to invest in new products so only the fast selling products with the highest level of margin will get any investment. The shareholders have not had a dividend for several years now and the shares values have flat lined over the last year so they are all losing money on the shares which cannot go on for ever.

Why does this matter to collectors of model vehicles? Well Corgi is hardly mentioned in any discussions of Hornby at all and apart from the 1:48 Lightning model investments in new mouldings are non-existent apart from a single 1:50 truck not even listed in the second half release section of their web pages.  The company states that its turnround is well under way with a belief that all UK brands have been maintained despite all the cost cutting measures taken, lower sales, and restrictions in the sales channels they are servicing. I am not sure that that does not count as what are now known as “alternate facts”. Collectors are right to be uneasy when they see that the  Corgi brand is not mentioned once in the plans for the next stage of the turnround.

It is against this background that Corgi announced their July to December catalogue. Almost everything in it is a new version of a casting already used several times in the past. Some castings  like the Vanguards Morris Minors and Mini are now several generations old and simply not up to the standards of Oxford Diecast, or PCT made models for part works or ranges like Whitebox. Looking at the Corgi Forum the posts about the new releases are mostly negative which I know reflects several MAR Online readers views as well. Corgi have not even listed some models on their web site that Hattons has listed like the re-released Basil Fawlty Austin  or yet another Mr Bean Mini.

I believe that the situation is clear: Hornby has no intention of investing in any significant level of new tooling for the Corgi ranges. Their sole idea of keeping Corgi alive is to produce re-paints of old castings and hope that they sell enough to milk some contribution from the brand to their financial recovery. In my opinion Corgi is now a spent force and Hornby is deluding itself if they expect collectors to pay nearly thirty pounds for Vanguards models made from  ageing moulds when DeAgostini/Atlas and others offer more for less money.

Corgi 2017 Second Half Catalogue

The models listed below are those listed by Corgi on their web site for the second half of 2017. Their January 2017 announcement was already reported here.  When checking a supplier website there are models available to order that are not in the catalogue such as five re-released James Bond vehicles, Mr Bean’s Mini, and Basil Fawlty’s 1100. There is also a single 1:50 scale lorry, Scania R (Face Lift) Flatbed Trailer & Brick Load “Ian Craig Haulage Ltd, Falkirk, Scotland”,  claimed to be new tooling. If these are new it seems strange that Corgi did not include them on their website listing.

My observations on the models offered are:

  1. The Royal Wedding Anniversary models are crude and horrid and quite expensive for the type of souvenir shop likely to want to stock them. I can’t see collectors wanting them at all.
  2. I hope the metallic models are not made with reflective flakes the size showing in pictures
  3. How many times are they going to release that Mini casting – it was not good when first released and looks even worse now compared to modern models?
  4. Who lined up all that awful thick silver detailing on the Minor Police Car windows?
  5. Why are they using the same moulds used already for re-paints recently so soon like the Sunbeam Alpine?
  6. Why is an “export” Rover 3500 fitted with UK number plates?
  7. Why keep on flogging the “New London Bus” to death when the new Mayor has cancelled buying any more of them?
  8. Why keep on releasing Land Rovers when Oxford will be doing them and charging significantly less?
  9. Why bother with the Captain Scarlett car? It has now slipped out of fashion again.
  10.   Many earlier releases of the re-used castings are available on eBay and at Toy Fairs for much less money why buy a new one?
  11. How can anybody at Corgi say they are “proud to introduce the July to December 2017 Corgi range, featuring a host of new introductions

Aviation Archive

English Electric Lightning F6 XR728/JS , RAF Binbrook

 

Albatros D.Va D.7327/17, Lt. Lothar Weiland, Jasta 5, Seefrontstaffel 1

 

Fokker DR.1 Triplane 213/17 ‘K’, Lt. Friedrich ‘Fritz’ Kempf, Jasta 2

 

Sopwith Camel F.1 B6313, Major William George ‘Billy’ Barker RAF

 

Boeing B-17G Flying Fortress 42-97880/DF-F ‘Little Miss Mischief’ USAAF

 

Panavia Tornado GR.4 ZA461, RAF No.15 Squadron, Special Scheme

 

Dornier Do17Z-2 U5-BH, 1./KG.2 ‘Holzhammer’ Operation Marita

 

Junkers Ju-88C-6 F8+BX, 13./KG40, Battle over the Biscay

 

Short Sunderland Mk.III W3999/ RB-Y No.10 Squadron RAAF, Early 1942

 

Blackburn Buccaneer S.2 XW538/S, RAF No.16 Squadron, RAF Gutersloh

 

Hawker Typhoon lB RB389/I8-P ‘Pulverizer IV’, No.440 Sqn RCAF

 

Messerschmitt Bf 110E-2 G9+LN, Oblt. Heinz-Wolfgang Schnaufer

 

Westland Puma HC.1 XW220/AC, RAF No.72 Squadron, Aldergrove, 1997

 

Hawker Hurricane Mk.1 N2359/YB-J, ‘Winged Popeye’, RAF No.17 Sqn

 

Gloster Sea Gladiator N5519/G6A, No,802 NAS, HMS Glorious, 1939

 

Messerschmitt Bf 109E-4 ‘Yellow 1’ Oblt. Gerhard Schopfel, Battle of Britain

 

Curtiss Hawk 81-A-2 P8127 ‘White 47’, Robert ‘R.T’ Smith, 3rd Sqn AVG

 

North American P-51D Mustang 44-13586/C5-T ‘Hurry Home Honey’, USAAF

Vanguards

 

Volkswagen Beetle, Type 1 Export Saloon Horizon Blue

 

Land Rover Series 1 80” RAC Road Service Vehicle

 

Ford Escort Mk3 XR3 Prairie Yellow

 

Austin Se7en Deluxe, Vanden Plas ‘Mini’ Lord Austin’s Daughter Irene Austin, Princess Blue-Grey Metallic

Morris Minor 1000 The Lothians and Peebles Constabulary

 

Ford Cortina Mk3 2000E Automatic Sahara Beige

 

Ford Cortina Mk2 Twin Cam (Lotus) Red II

 

Rover P6 3500S Scarab Blue, Export Specification, RHD

 

Ford Escort Mk1 RS2000 Modena Green

 

Ford Sierra XR4i Strato Silver

 

Ford Capri 2300GT Mk1 1969 Tour de France Automobile

 

Ford Escort Mk2 RS1800 1979 Lombard RAC Rally of Great Britain

 

Sunbeam Alpine Series 2 Quartz Blue Metallic

 

Morris Minor 1000 Traveller Bermuda Blue

Original Omnibus

 

New Routemaster, Go-Ahead London, 88 Camden Town

 

New Routemaster, Go Ahead London, 88 Clapham Common

 

Wright Eclipse Gemini 2 Harry Potter Warner Bros. Studio Shuttle Bus

Others

 

Paddington Bear New Routemaster

 

Captain Scarlet Classic Spectrum Saloon Car

 

70th Anniversary of The Royal Wedding – Classic Mini

 

70th Anniversary of The Royal Wedding – Classic Routemaster

Bloodhound SSC Super Hauler

 

Corgi Christmas Super Hauler

Closing thoughts

Long time MAR readers will know that I have been a collector of Corgi models in the past and have been getting more and more restive with each underwhelming release announcement. I know many of you feel the same. I think that the thing I find most insulting to collectors is the pretence that the Corgi range is active and vibrant. Some honesty and openness about the role Hornby think Corgi has going forward would be welcome. Some of us have been Corgi Collectors since our childhood.

What do you the reader think?

Last thought. If  Hornby can’t make anything of the range, it would surely be better to sell it to someone else who can?


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