Category Archives: 1:12

Minichamps – Announcements January 2017

By Maz Woolley

 

Here are Minichamps latest announcements. All are made in China for Germany in a variety of scales and materials. These are expected to be released over the first two months of 2017 and I am sure more new models will be revealed at the start of February when Minichamps will have a stand at the Nuremberg Toyfair.

The releases cover 1:12 for motorbikes and 1:18 and 1:43 scales for other vehicles. Both diecast and resin bodies are used. The racing vehicles are finished with very detailed liveries and where made in metal may have opening parts.

A single release in the Maxichamps range is shown. The BMW 700, which was produced in the standard Minichamps road cars range many years ago, and which is now produced as a budget model.

Minichamps continue to focus on producing models of Formula 1 old and new, Moto GP, and Touring car racing.  The  cars  are often produced in both 1:18 and 1:43 scales. Road cars are still released but now form a smaller proportion of their output. Road cars made to 1:18 scale seem to be released as frequently as 1:43 scale in the MInichamps range. .

Where pictures of hand made samples were provided by MInichamps these have been shown.

BMW 3.5 CSL – GR. 5 – ´GÖSSER BIER´ – TEAM SCHNITZER – QUESTER/NILSSON – WINNERS 6H ZELTWEG  1:18 Scale


BMW M1 PROCAR – BMW MOTORSPORT – SURER – EIFELRENNEN DRM 1979 1:43


BMW M4 (F82) – BMW TEAM RBM – JOEY HAND – DTM 2014 1:43


BMW M4 (F82) – BMW TEAM MTEK – TIMO GLOCK – DTM 2014 1:43


BMW M4 (F82) – BMW TEAM RMG – MARCO WITTMANN – DTM 2014


MCLAREN HONDA MP4-31 – FERNANDO ALONSO – 2016 1:43

No sample pictured


MCLAREN HONDA MP4-31 – JENSON BUTTON – 2016 1:43

No sample pictured


ROLLS ROYCE SILVER CLOUD II – 1954 – BLACK 1:18


MERCEDES-BENZ 300 SL ROADSTER (W198) – 1957 – WHITE 1:18

No sample pictured


BMW 3.5 CSL – SEPP MANHALTER – WINNER HAVIROV INTERNATIONAL – 1977 1:18

No sample pictured


BMW M1 PROCAR – BMW ITALIA – ELIO DE ANGELIS – WINNER PROCAR SERIES ZOLDER 1979 1:18

No sample pictured


BMW M1 PROCAR – PLAIN BODY VERSION – 1979 – YELLOW 1:18


BMW 700 LS – 1960 – SILVER 1:43


BMW 700 LS – 1960 – RED 1:43


MERCEDES AMG PETRONAS FORMULA ONE TEAM F1 W07 HYBRID – NICO ROSBERG – 2016 1:18

No sample pictured


MERCEDES AMG PETRONAS FORMULA ONE TEAM F1 W07 HYBRID – LEWIS HAMILTON – 2016 1:18

No sample pictured


RED BULL RACING TAG-HEUER RB12 – MAX VERSTAPPEN – WINNER SPANISH GP 2016 1:18

No sample pictured


DUCATI DESMOSEDICI GP12 – NICKY HAYDEN – MOTOGP 2012 1:12

No sample pictured


ALFA ROMEO GIULIA 1300 – 1966 – BLUE . 1:18


BMW M1 – MK MOTORSPORT – WITMEUR/KRANKENBERG/LIBERT – 24H LE MANS 1986 1:18

No sample pictured


LOTUS FORD 72 – REINE WISELL – CANADIAN GP 1972 1:43

No sample pictured


BENTLEY GT3 ADAC 24H NÜRBURGRING # 85 1:43

No sample pictured


BENTLEY GT3 ADAC 24H NÜRBURGRING # 84 1:43

No sample pictured


PORSCHE 911 S – RACING TEAM AAW – FRÖHLICH/TOIVONEN – CLASS WINNERS ADAC 1000 KM-RENNEN 1970 1:18

No sample pictured


MERCEDES AMG PETRONAS F1 TEAM W05 – LEWIS HAMILTON – WINNER MALAYSIAN GP 2014 1:18

No sample pictured


RED BULL RACING TAG-HEUER RB12 – DANIEL RICCIARDO – 2016 1:18

No sample pictured


RED BULL RACING TAG-HEUER RB12 – DANIIL KVYAT – 2016 1:18

No sample pictured


DUCATI DESMOSEDICI GP13 – ANDREA DOVIZIOSO – MOTOGP 2013 1:12

No sample pictured


DUCATI DESMOSEDICI GP13 – NICKY HAYDEN – MOTOGP 2013 1:12

No sample pictured


BMW 3.5 CSL – MILLER/COWART – 6H WATKINS GLEN 1979 1:18

No sample pictured


BMW M4 (F82) – BMW TEAM RMG – MAXIME MARTIN – DTM 2014 1:43


BMW M4 (F82) – BMW TEAM RBM – TOM BLOMQVIST – DTM 2015 1:43


BMW M4 (F82) – BMW TEAM RMG – MAXIME MARTIN – DTM 2015 1:43


PORSCHE 911 S – ÉCURIE JEAN SAGE – WALDEGARD/CHENEVIÈRE – 24H LE MANS 1971 1:18

No sample pictured


MERCEDES-BENZ 300 SL ROADSTER (W198) – 1957 – RED – W/ HARDTOP 1:18


BMW 3,5 CSL – GR.5 – ´HERMETITE´ – FITZPATRICK/WALKINSHAW – WINNERS 6H SILVERSTONE 1976 1:18


LOTUS FORD 72 – DAVE WALKER – USA GP 1972 1:43

No sample pictured


PORSCHE CAYMAN GT4 – 2016 – WHITE 1:43

No sample pictured


RENAULT ALPINE A110 – 1971 – BLUE METALLIC 1:43

No sample pictured


RENAULT ALPINE A110 – 1971 – YELLOW 1:43

No sample pictured


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The Motor Scooter in Miniature – Lambretta

By Dave Turner

 

As if seriously collecting model Fords and Rileys,  as well as model railways, didn’t strain the spare funds and time enough, the life long fascination with motor scooters had the inevitable effect and a number of inexpensive model scooters have slowly been accumulated over the past 40 years or so. For many years these were rather neglected and no positive effort was made to identify or study them until recently.

One of many long standing literary activities has been producing short pieces for the local classic car club each featuring a picture of a vehicle owned in the past along with a picture of a model of the exact vehicle, not possible in many cases as there has never been models of many specific variations of the real thing. As a bit of a novelty one piece was produced featuring the first vehicle owned by the writer – a 1958 Vespa 125. Several black and white snaps were taken at the time – the late 1950s, but as the model scooter ‘collection’ had never been properly studied, the presence or absence of the appropriate 92L2 model Vespa had never been determined – there was not one!

However in the long process of checking through the models it became apparent that not only were there several duplicates (and even triplicates) trying to identify each model became a project in itself – and is far from complete. Having accumulated all this information, and there is far more to come, to us compulsive scribblers the obvious next step is to put it all down in some form of understandable text.

The history of real motor scooters has been set out a few times in book form, in fact the little Auto Review booklets on the subject should have inspired the need to continue with a study of models of them (Dave is the Author of  Auto Review 04 Scooters Part One and Auto Review 10 Scooters Part Two both still available on the Oxford Diecast website or from Auto Review direct). For some reason, no doubt total lack of time, nothing happened as far as an in depth study although a few pages of these little books touched on the subject. Obviously the foregoing is not claiming to be a complete listing of model scooters, they crop up all the time and many made by small operations have yet to be discovered. Information on those missed will be gratefully accepted.

If only because the models have been sorted first, Lambretta will start the ball rolling. This scooter had its roots back in 1931 when Ferdinando Innocenti, a plumber began the production of pipes and tubing but following the Second World War an alternative product was sought and a motor scooter seemed in demand. Production began in 1945, the name Lambretta being derived from the area of Milan that the factory occupied – Lambrate. Experience with tubing manufacture made the choice to give the new machine a tubular frame obvious, while all the early types featured exposed mechanicals and initially lacked suspension.

The first offering from Lambretta was the Model A made from October 1947 for just 12 months, a total of 9669 were made. A model of this has been made and marketed by The Bradford Exchange.

Another of the earliest types to be found in model form is the 125C made from February 1950 to November 1951. This formed the basis of the Lambretta for many years with its single tube frame and trailing link front suspension. The Italian die cast range of Mercury produced these in 1952 in 1:28 scale and featured some simple detail with a bent wire stand to keep the model upright. A partly enclosed front wheel was not typical with the real 125C but was no doubt employed on the model to give the axle some support, reproducing the trailing link suspension in diecast would be quite fragile for a toy.

In common with many other Mercury subjects, the 125C has been reproduced by Scottoy and is almost exactly the same – the axles have a rolled end at one side and the wire stand is slightly simplified.

Appearing shortly after the 125C, the 125LC was the same scooter but fully enclosed and with a larger apron in the manner that we came to associate with the later LD. This was also modelled by Mercury in 1952 and makes a fine companion to their 125C looking so much more modern. It was also reproduced by Scottoy.
In 1951 the 125D and fully clothed 125LD arrived and featured a re-designed frame and many other improvements. They came in four series between December 1951 and 1961, a choice of 150cc engine from the second series while the fourth series were made in France.
A 1:12 scale 125D was made by New Ray in 2012 but just which of the three types of 125D is not certain.

Going back to the early 1950s a 1:11 scale plastic LD 125 was made by Mettoy. Obviously a toy as it featured a flywheel motor driving the back axle on which were a pair of small plastic wheels that enabled the scooter to travel upright. Twin portholes on the rear flanks suggest that it is of the 1st Series of LD made from December 1951 to May 1953. This example was quite well battered when found many years ago, it has had to suffice as no other has ever been found. No marking suggested a maker, although the front licence plate reads “MTY 134” suggesting it was a Mettoy product and a pair of “Made in Gt Britain” logos are stamped below the twin port holes on the side panels. When new these came with a plastic rider.

At the other end of the extreme a very nice plastic model 1st Series 125LD came from Solido in 1:18 scale. Featuring movable steering, a spare wheel and plated carrier it has plenty of delicate looking detail including a kickstart, folding stand, brake and clutch levers. Rather a model than a toy.

The TV175, first of the Li Series in September 1957 set a new benchmark for Lambretta with more modern styling and easily identified by the fixed front mudguard with headlight on the front apron. This was followed by 125 and 150cc versions in September 1958 and all three were produced until October 1959 when the Series 11 Li arrived. Easily identified again, this time by the headlight being placed on the handlebars rather than on the front apron. These were made until September 1961 when the subsequent “Slim Style’ body was adopted.

A few models of the Series 1 Li have been made and include the Xonex at around 1:18 from about 20 years ago. A smaller one came from CLM Hitech and an even smaller example from BTS that was derived from the old Spot On S.11 Li. The Bradford Exchange offer a S.1 in resin around 1:18 scale.

As far as the S.11 versions go, as just mentioned Spot On did one in 1966 and this was later reproduced by BTS. It has also suffered at least one plastic copy from Hong Kong. The Bradford Exchange marketed a S.11 in Rallymaster guise complete with little screen, racing number and stripes. The real Rallymaster version of the 150 was discontinued in September 1962. Curiously the same models in a different scale are known to be marketed under the Hamilton Collection umbrella. Both these operations seem to be interested in dealing only online.

Perhaps among the smallest model scooters is a 1:76 plastic S.11 that comes from Hornby in a set of “city people’ in their range of model railway trackside accessories. Despite its modest size it is sufficiently detailed to be identifiable as S.11.

Next in line, the Series 111 Li, known as the Slimstyle due to its narrower build, was produced in numerous forms from December 1962. the 125 version lasted only to October 1964 but re-appeared as the GP125 in December 1969 for just two years. The 150 however, produced in various forms – Grand Luxe, Special Pacemaker, SX and GP, lasted well into the 1970s although Lambretta production continued in India until 1997.
A TV175 version of the Series 111 was made from April 1962 for just under 2 years but larger engined 200cc machines in GT, SX and GP variations were made into the 1970s.

Some models/toys of scooters are difficult to identify, some are simply products of a creative mind and toys for youngsters as a result. For example, a 1:13 scale clockwork plastic toy came from Ace Toys in Hong Kong featuring a pair of plastic wheels at the rear. It does look very much like it is meant to depict a Series 111 Li Lambretta, the side stripes echoing those on the GP200, the real examples of which were latterly made in India.

Britains are well known for their farm and agricultural models in 1:32, no surprise that their Slimstyle Li came in that scale. Simple but attractive model it seems almost dwarfed by the young couple on board.

Looking very similar but much more highly detailed are the Lambrettas from Recollections that not only have the kickstart pedal and silencer featured in the nether regions but the side panels lift off to reveal a fully detailed engine, fuel tank etc. Still at 1:32 the CLM HiTech range of models includes a S.111 while moving to larger scales, the Bradford Exchange offered a 1:18 GP/DL 200 and Black Country Metal Works did several S.111s in 1:5 scale. These included a 1963 depicting the Quadrophenia ‘star’ from the film, a 1968 150 Special and a 1966 200SX.

A range called Globo Telethon offered diecast Series 111s under the Heavy Metal label and are said to be 1:12 scale. That scale was also used by the Road Signature 1965 TV 175 while the plastic kits from Pyro and Retro make a SX200 at 1:16.

Produced for three years from 1966, the J range of scooters was aimed at the lady rider and came in J50cc, Cento 100cc. and Starstream 125cc versions. So far the only model to be recorded was by BTS.

Known Models

Model A
The Bradford Exchange 126B1033 05 1:18 resin
125C
Mercury Italy 213 1952 56mm 1:28 diecast
Scottoy  repro of Mercury 56mm 1:28 diecast
125LC
Mercury Italy 214 1952 59mm 1:28 diecast
Scottoy – repro of Mercury 59mm 1:28 diecast
125D
New Ray 2012 150mm 1:12 diecast
CLM HiTech CLM 018 1:32
125LD
Mettoy UK 134 1952 160mm 1:11 Plastic/flywheel
Solido China 534657 98mm 1:18 plastic
IXO TXO M7 1:24
Li Series 1
Xonex China 1998 TV175 100mm 1:18 diecast
BTS UK TV175 mod from Spot On 1:42 diecast/resin
CLM HiTech CLM 013 Li 125 1:32
The Bradford Exchange 126B 1033 04 1:18 resin
Li Series 11
Spot On UK 229 1966 Li 150 47m 1:42 diecast/plastic
? Hong Kong plastic copy of Spot on 44mm 1:42 plastic
BTS UK Li 150 repro of Spot On 47mm 1:42 diecast/resin
Hornby China R560 1990s 25mm 1:72 plastic
The Bradford Exchange 126B 1033 03 Li150  Rallymaster 1:18 resin
The Hamilton Collection  Li150 1:12 diecast
Li Series 111 
Ace Toy Hong Kong GP200 134mm 1:13 Plastic/Clockwork
Britains UK 9685 56mm 1:32 diecast
CLM HiTech CLM 015 1:33 diecast
Recollections UK 1995 TV175 58mm 1:34 diecast
Recollections UK 1995 GP200 56mm 1:35 diecast
Recollections UK 1995 SX200 58mm 1:36 diecast
The Bradford Exchange 126B 1033 02 GP/DL200 100mm 1:18 resin
Globo Telethon 31085 1:12 diecast
Black Country Metal Works 1963 Quadrophenia 330mm 1:5 Tin
Black Country Metal Works 1968 150 Special 330mm 1:5 Tin
Black Country Metal Works 1966 200SX 330mm 1:5 Tin
Road Signature 41507RB 1965 TV175 150mm 1:12 diecast
The Hamilton Collection 1967 Li150 1:12 diecast
The Hamilton Collection 1969 GP D/L 200 1:12 diecast
Pyro M155 X200 1:16 Plastic kit
Retro SX200 1:16
 J125
BTS  UK

Illustrations:

BTS 1:42 diecast and resin from UK, repro of Spot On: Lambretta Li Series 11

1:42 plastic from Hong Kong, copy of Spot On: Lambretta Li Series 11.

Recollections 1:32 diecast from UK: Lambretta Li Series 111 GP200.


Recollections 1:32 diecast from UK: Lambretta Li Series 111 TV175

Scottoy 1:28 diecast, repro of Mercury: Lambretta125C

Mercury 1:28 diecast from Italy: 214 Lambretta 125LC.

Mercury 1:28 diecast from Italy: 213 Lambretta 125C

Britains 1:32 diecast from UK: 9685 Lambretta Li Series 111

Ace Toy 1:13 clockwork plastic from Hong Kong: Lambretta Li Series 111 GP200

Hornby 1:72 plastic from China:R560 Lambretta Li Series 11

Mettoy 1:11 flywheel plastic from UK: 134, Lambretta 125LD

Xonex 1:18 diecast from China: Lambretta Li Series 1 TV175

Solido 1:18 plastic from China: 534657, Lambretta 125LD

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Ten Model Car Brands With Unusual Histories

By Ron Ruelle

Ron is Social Media Guy, Catalog Editor, and Collectibles Expert at hobbyDB, a database and marketplace for collectibles, and originally published this article at the lamleygroup blog and then on the hobbyDB blog. Therefore, the titles link to items at hobbyDB.  Click on the photos for larger images.

Anyone who’s collected model cars for any amount of time has become acquainted with the major diecast brands as well as some of the small-market, niche-oriented companies. There are a lot of older brands that have gone by the wayside, or have been bought and sold so many times you aren’t sure who they are anymore. Here are a few diecast oddities to add to your collection.  Some are older, some newer, but they are listed in random order.


Jet Wheels/AMT Pups

lamleyjetwheels

lamleyamtpup

Jet Wheels was a company that made realistically proportioned 1:65 scale models with working suspension and opening hoods or other features. The earliest cars from the late 1960s were in fact made by AMT, (they called the series “Pups”) who then sold the business and the molds to Mego. The original range of 8 American street cars was augmented by a series of Formula 1 cars as well as some garage and track accessories. Some of these were later released under the Tuffy and Super Speedy names, but they eventually faded into history…

lamleyfast111s2
Kenner’s foray into 1:64 scale diecast only lasted a few years in the late 1970s, but they made some interesting cars. Some of them were souped-up models of production cars, while others were far-out fantasy rides. What tied them all together was the rear bumpers, which stuck out and angled upward so you could read the license plate. Each of these cars represented a different state, so the plates were kind of a big deal. The packaging also had a neat feature, a transferable “title” that was to filled out by the kid who bought it and then filled out again if it was traded or sold. Clean copies without writing on the back are somewhat rare these days.

lamleyminimack
This range of toys included a variety of construction equipment such as dump trucks, loaders, and tractors, not all of the Mack brand vehicles. This was one of several brands available from Zee Toys in the late 1970s. Detail is surprisingly vague, as they appear to be direct, unauthorized knockoffs of Matchbox cars from a few years earlier. With different wheels and the wording removed from the base, they just seem a bit “cheaper” than the originals.

lamleyzylmex
Here’s another brand from Zee Toys, one that tried a little harder than Mini Macks. Detail is again pretty basic, especially the interiors, but at least they were trying by creating their own original molds. And they even made a model of the George Barris SuperVan, so that has to count for something, right?
lamleyzylmex2

lamleytoughwheels
This was a brand of inexpensive, crudely detailed cars perfect for letting your kids play with in the sandbox. In a strange twist, instead of these cars being based on another well-known brand, the molds served as the basis for a revival of another popular brand. In the early 1980s, as Dinky was headed for bankruptcy, Kidco rebadged some of these cars under the Dinky name, a sad step down in quality. Despite the crude detail, Tough Wheels managed to score a few licensed properties such as M*A*S*H vehicles.

 lamleyburninkeys

Then there were the Burnin’ Key Cars, a subset of Tough Wheels. These came with a very cool feature: a spring-wound motor that was activated by a slightly out of scale key. As with the Tough Wheels brand, they managed to finagle licensing deals with some popular TV shows, including Magnum P.I. and Knight Rider. For several years, the Burnin’ Wheels name lived on as a Matchbox brand and then again as part of Maisto. Each change of ownership brought vastly improved designs and packaging.


lamleydoepke
You may not recognize the name, but if you’re of a certain age, you should know their cars… Doepke started off as a family company in 1946 making mostly construction and fire vehicles. The owner’s mother suggested that they not make military vehicles (it was just after the war) and to make more peaceful toys.  They also created some very large scale kits, about 1:12 scale, of a Jaguar XK120 and an MG TD… [ED: Here is a great website with lots of Doepke info and photos.]

The bodies are made of thick diecast metal, while other parts were white metal, plastic or stamped steel. Both cars featured working steering and suspension. The MG was branded as the “MT” so they may not have had the rights to produce that particular model. While only available for a few years, these kits were huge sellers at the time.


lamleyfresh
Hard to say if these models were meant as a sincere tribute or something of an ironic joke. This division of Motor Max made models of Pintos, Gremlins, LeBaron wagons and such… not exactly the keys to real-life excitement. On the other hand, it’s been hard to find models of these cars if you did want them, and Fresh Cherries cars were nicely detailed with delicate luggage racks and other bits. They came in several scales including 1:24, 1:64 and 1:87, all in high quality packaging. They even did 1:16 radio controlled versions of some of these cars, and you have to admit that’s beyond awesome.

lamleygrell
It’s understandable if you don’t recognize this brand… This Eastern European company made mostly promotional models of Trabants and Wartburgs and Moskviches that were given away not in cereal boxes, but in cases of beer! In fact, only a few of their models represented common Western European marques like Volkswagen or Jaguar. Some of their packaging evokes a strong Cold War era image, something you don’t see every day at any scale.

scuttle_bug_model_cars_7fb1b569-59fb-4867-a02e-579fd7bf7ce2
Wait, Hallmark? Like the card company? Yep! In the early 1970s, Hallmark introduced a series of overtly cartoony cars called Road Rovers, which looked almost like balloon creations. They were roughly the size of 1:64 scale cars, but because they are so oddly proportioned, scale is irrelevant here. The early cars were all metal and represented familiar vehicle types such as fire trucks or Volkswagen Beetles. After a decade hiatus, the brand was revived in the mid 1980s with plastic bases. The new line included reinterpretations of several of the originals plus designs that transformed objects such as vacuum cleaners or piggy banks into cars.
rosey_racer_model_cars_65dd98aa-0d9e-47cd-8fd0-07edb43e5a4a

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News from the Continent Aug/Sep 2016 – Bauer

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

 

Photographs are by the author.

18804-09-2016

Heinrich Bauer GmbH & Co. KG have launched their exclusive 1:12 scale model of the Bugatti Type 57S Atalante of 1937. This model was  originally announced  3 years ago at the Nuremberg Toy Fair.

18807-09-2016

After the bankruptcy of the first manufacturer, disappearance of the moulds and re-starting  of the project, the Atalante finally appears in the impressively large size of 1:12 scale. It is painted in red and black or yellow and black. The project was finished under supervision of Bugatti s.a.s.

18805-09-2016

The bonnet and doors can be opened and the engine shows even the smallest details. The interior is lovingly detailed. Underneath there is a working drive train, suspension and steering.

18808-09-2016

7828-Z75 comes as limited edition of 1500 pieces in red and black

7828-Z75Y comes as limited edition of 500 pieces in yellow and black

18806-09-2016

 

More details of this model may be seen on the website www.bauer-spielwaren.de.


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