Category Archives: 1:10

Maserati 4CLT c.1:10 scale handbuilt model

By Jerry J. Broz

All Photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

Here we are looking at a few pictures of my very first model car, which was not a scale model, but an accurate depiction of the 1948 Maserati 4CLT. Built in 1955, when I was sixteen-year old, to approximately 1:10 scale, this model car is sixty-two years old. Back in 1955 when I started work on this model I had no documentation available for the actual car. and no access to any detailed drawings or photos; however, I was able to find some basic descriptions and a few low quality photographs taken at Grand Prix races.

The chassis and hood of the model were made from an aluminium sheet. The body was carved from balsa wood, sealed with a paste made from clear lacquer and baby powder, and then sanded and painted. The louvres in the body were hand carved and the louvres in the hood were hand formed. The brake disks and wheel centre hubs were turned from round aluminium rod on a small lathe. The wheels were made from short aluminium containers for water colour paints. The rims and center hubs were glued together and small holes were drilled around the perimeter of the rims and hubs for the spokes. Each wheel assembly was then hand-laced with smooth, thick thread in order to simulate the spoke pattern typical of wire wheels. Before the tires were attached to the wheels, whole wheel assemblies were spray painted with aluminium colour paint.
The toy rubber tires, the number “7’ stickers, and the screws are the only commercially purchased items used in this model car.

The metalwork, such as the dashboard, suspension arms, radiator grille frame, steering wheel centre, arm protector (with drilled perforation), windscreen frame, gas filler cap, tie and steering
rods, and hub caps, were either cut from aluminium sheets, made from aluminium wire, or turned from round aluminium rod and polished as needed. The exhaust was made from aluminium circular
tubing and painted flat black. All small parts were adapted from anything which could serve the purpose.

The cockpit; the cockpit detail is minimal, gauge bezels were turned from aluminium round rod and then the gauge faces were hand drawn in. The rear view mirrors were turned from hardwood dowel and then the silver mirrors were painted in. The two-part seat was hand-made from thin leather which was stretched over the seat shape made from balsa wood, stuffed with cotton balls and shaped into a seat. The circular steering wheel rim was hand-made and shaped from hardwood, painted black, and attached to the steering column by a metal three-spoke central part. The windscreen was made from clear plastic and glued into an aluminium windscreen frame.

A black/white photo of this 1948 Maserati 4CLT model was featured in December 1964 issue of the Auto World Newsletter. I expect that some of you might remember Auto World which was a model car mail-order business founded by Oscar Koveleski. Throughout my entire life I have been interested in model and full size racing cars. I have built and raced the slot cars, written articles for Car Model magazine, worked for Auto World, designed model cars and accessories for Auto World, Twin-K, Tonka, to name just a few. I have been involved with CAN-AM race cars and, of course, Formula One.

Since my retirement, I have remained active in Formula One, and am subscribing to F1 magazines, following F1 on TV and on computer and collecting the F1 memorabilia and various types of F1 model cars and kits. I have also took upon a new hobby, collecting and building customised and concept Volkswagen Old & New Beetles and Volkswagen Transporter T1 Trucks, Vans and Minibus models and kits.

A view of the front and left (exhaust) side of the completed car.

A front view of the completed model showing the radiator
frame with a wire simulated grille, and the front wheels
suspension arms as well as the oil lines.

A rear view of the completed model showing rear-view
mirrors, steering wheel, windscreen frame and clear
plastic windscreen,a part of the perforated arm protector,
and the dashboard with hand-drawn gauges.

A detail of the hood and body louvres and hand-laced
wire wheels.

A rear view of the completed model showing gas filler cap, rear exhaust holder, and full arm protector.

Underside view of the Maserati 4CLT model. The piece
of a 1.5ccm model gas engine was left in as a part of the
rear axle after realising that I was to build a curbside model rather
than tethered, model gas engine powered car which
would have required a completely different design of wheels,
tires, and attachment of the front wheels to the body.

 

Editor: We hope to show some more of Jerry’s adapted and hand-made models in future posts to this site.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please contact us at our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Big Hand Crafted Four by Fours – Part Four

By Robert Gunn

Readers of MAR magazine will have been familiar with Robert’s contributions as an expert on pickup trucks. Since retirement he has been making a selection of 4×4 vehicles by hand which he will share with us over a series of articles. All photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

The Models

The models are hand made to 1:10 scale. Each is a unique creation and when finished is displayed on a modelled plinth in a clear cabinet. Here we look at the fourth of my models the 2016 Land Rover ‘Heritage Edition’ Defender.

How the models are made

All have a softwood chassis of pine or deal. Most body sides are tempered hardboard, as are the floors, but bonnet lids are metal – either aluminium or or nickel-silver sheet. Rounded corners are of timber beading, usually hardwood. Small details are made of anything which suits from my huge boxes of bits – parts of old pens, pieces of metal or plastic, nuts and bolts, tubes and so on. Sticks of solder are good to file into manifolds, carburetors and similar. Windscreen frames are either brass sheets and strips, or latterly in sheet polystyrene plastic.

Parts which I can’t make are brought-in, such as wheels, tyres, mirrors, lights, and badges.

Glues used vary from white PVA (Woodworking Glue) through super glue, Scotch glue and others. “JB Kwik” two pack epoxy is also very useful stuff – a combined glue and filler.

Part Four – Land Rover Defender ‘Heritage Edition’ 2016

 

On it’s diorama. Real chestnut rail fencing made from a 30 year old post found in my garden.

 

Front axle and steering gear.

 

Front axle and steering gear again.

 

Underside view

 

Details of lower door hinge. Tiny screws out of an old camera. Aluminium brush finish obtained using wire brush in a mini electric drill.

A view of the engine.

 

Another engine view.

 

Interior view. Canopy lifts off to enable inside to be seen.

 

Rear view of finished model.

 

Front view of finished model. The real ‘last Defender’ had an egg-crate grille in plastic which looked a bit ugly. So I made mine in real wire mesh, like a traditional Land Rover. The etched Land Rover badges are from a specialist – they’re quite expensive but are superbly made.

 

A view of the driver’s side of the completed model showing mirrors, black grilles in the wings and a host of other fine details.

 

Higher view of the front and side of the completed model.

 

Low view of front and side of completed model.

 

Engine installed. The thick sturdy metal bonnet stay was unaltered on the real Land Rover from 1948 to the last Defender!

 

Rear corner. Lights from an eBay supplier from the Czech Republic. Tiny screws from an old camera. The ‘reversing lights’ jewel was a motor scooter’s headlamp on a Birthday card I received.

 

Rear view of completed model

 

Front/Side view of completed model.

 

Seats and console. The real ‘Last Defender’ which the factory are keeping for their museum has cream leather seats. I bought cream leather on eBay ‘same as used by Aston Martin’  and glued it over timber patterns. The seats come from a ‘Bratz Doll’ 1:10 scale Cadillac car and were much modified to the correct shape.

 

The main body early on before the ride height was adjusted by shortening the springs.

 

Rear end. Early test fit. The tailgate is brass and aluminium with hard wood ‘triangle pieces’ in corners.

 

Primed chassis and front bulkhead. Coil spring towers are pen-caps!

 

The Land Rover’s chassis. Two pieces of structural quality softwood, glued together then cut to correct profile. Wood filler has been applied and it is ready to prime.

 

The finished Land Rover on it’s diorama with chestnut fencing.

Editor – Robert’s latest project is a 1:10 scale hand made 1955 Land Rover Series One 107 inch long wheelbase pickup. We at MAR Online look forward to Robert sharing the pictures and details of that build with us when it is finished.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please contact us at our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Big Hand Crafted Four by Fours – Part Three

By Robert Gunn

Readers of MAR magazine will have been familiar with Robert’s contributions as an expert on pickup trucks. Since retirement he has been making a selection of 4×4 vehicles by hand which he will share with us over a series of articles. All photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

The Models

The models are hand made to 1:10 scale. Each is a unique creation and when finished is displayed on a modelled plinth in a clear cabinet. Here we look at the third of my models the Datsun Patrol.

How the models are made

All have a softwood chassis of pine or deal. Most body sides are tempered hardboard, as are the floors, but bonnet lids are metal – either aluminium or or nickel-silver sheet. Rounded corners are of timber beading, usually hardwood. Small details are made of anything which suits from my huge boxes of bits – parts of old pens, pieces of metal or plastic, nuts and bolts, tubes and so on. Sticks of solder are good to file into manifolds, carburetors and similar. Windscreen frames are either brass sheets and strips, or latterly in sheet polystyrene plastic.

Parts which I can’t make are brought-in, such as wheels, tyres, mirrors, lights, and badges.

Glues used vary from white PVA (Woodworking Glue) through super glue, Scotch glue and others. “JB Kwik” two pack epoxy is also very useful stuff – a combined glue and filler.

Part Three – Datsun Patrol L-60 1965

 

Alice the farm girl – Sarah’s sister – another modified Katmiss (Jennifer Lawrence) figure with new clothes and a bow and arrow surgically removed! She is holding a traditional wooden rake with prongs made individually from cocktail sticks.

 

Test fitting the parts with the Datsun in its ‘first-coat’ orange paint.

 

Datsun door cards and handles. These are filed from aluminium with pin heads as the ‘bolts’.

 

Datsun dashboard
 
Datsun Engine. A 3956cc unit producing 145hp when the Land Rover had 2286cc and 77hp.

 

Alice checking the engine.

 

 

Alice with the Datsun.

 

 

Swinging the spare tyre carrier aside to allow the rear tailgate to be opened.

 

Alice on the diorama I made with the rake.

A future article by Robert will cover the Land Rover Defender Heritage Edition 2016 he has made.

 We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email us at maronlineeditor@gmail.com.

Big Hand Crafted Four by Fours – Part Two

By Robert Gunn

Readers of MAR magazine will have been familiar with Robert’s contributions as an expert on pickup trucks. Since retirement he has been making a selection of 4×4 vehicles by hand which he will share with us over a series of articles. All photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

The Models

The models are hand made to 1:10 scale. Each is a unique creation and when finished is displayed on a modelled plinth in a clear cabinet. Here we look at the second of my models the Toyota Land Cruiser FJ25 from 1958.

How the models are made

All have a softwood chassis of pine or deal. Most body sides are tempered hardboard, as are the floors, but bonnet lids are metal – either aluminium or or nickel-silver sheet. Rounded corners are of timber beading, usually hardwood. Small details are made of anything which suits from my huge boxes of bits – parts of old pens, pieces of metal or plastic, nuts and bolts, tubes and so on. Sticks of solder are good to file into manifolds, carburetors and similar. Windscreen frames are either brass sheets and strips, or latterly in sheet polystyrene plastic.

Parts which I can’t make are brought-in, such as wheels, tyres, mirrors, lights, and badges.

Glues used vary from white PVA (Woodworking Glue) through super glue, Scotch glue and others. “JB Kwik” two pack epoxy is also very useful stuff – a combined glue and filler.

Part Two – Toyota Land Cruiser FJ25 1958

Like Rover in the UK Toyota were a company with a strong engineering heritage from power looms onwards. By the 1950s they too had seen the need for a sturdy utility vehicle with “go anywhere”  capabilities. Indeed they were asked to build some Jeeps for the US military during the Korean War. The Land Cruiser series were Toyota’s equivalent to the Land Rover built in various configurations to meet a multitude of requirements.

FJ 25 pedals and gear levers depicted in great detail.

Completed FJ25 model shown on a turntable diorama with Sarah the farm girl. The figure started life as Jennifer Lawrence as “Katniss” in the Hunger Games, re-clothed by the Author.

This is the basic body: tempered hardboard and sheet metal bonnet in nickel silver. The bonnet was very hard to make.

The windscreen frame: all made from brass.

Trial assembly painted with primer coat. As well as checking the fit of the parts test assembly helps keep up enthusiasm on a long and complex project.

Toyota rear bumper, bolted together just like the real (steel) one.

Toyota spare wheel carrier, pinned and screwed from solid brass.

Toyota seats – Imitation leather from a charity shop handbag stretched over wooden ‘cushions’ with frames made from coat hanger wire.

Dash and steering wheel of the Toyota. The glovebox opens on tiny hinges.

Frontal view of the completed Toyota.

Nearside view of the completed vehicle. 

Left hand side of the completed vehicle showing the 4×4 stance. 

Rear view of the completed Toyota. A specialist made me the ‘Toyota’ badges, and he did a fine job. Even getting the slightly greenish -cream enamel infill colour exactly right. Thanks, Gary!

Toyota bonnet badge was filed from two pieces of real silver bought as scrap pieces from a jeweller. Strip along the bonnet centre line is also made from silver. 

The Land Cruiser’s engine bay with detailed engine and ancillary parts.

The bonnet displayed opened.

I made a working, fully functioning screw-pillar jack for the Toyota. the Frame is bent from thick nickel silver bars and the rest is built of adds and ends. The jack can actually be used to lift the model!  

Sarah checking the radiator.

Loading animal feed. Showing the working drop down tailgate.


Future articles by Robert will cover the following vehicles: Datsun Patrol L-60 1965; and the Land Rover Defender Heritage Edition 2016.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page.

Big Hand crafted Four by Fours – 1965 Hotchkiss-Willys Jeep

By Robert P. Gunn

Readers of MAR magazine will have been familiar with Robert’s contributions as an expert on pickup trucks. Since retirement he has been making a selection of 4×4 vehicles by hand which he will share with us over a series of articles. All photographs are by, and copyright of, the Author.

The Models

The models are hand made to 1:10 scale. Each is a unique creation and when finished is displayed on a modelled plinth in a clear cabinet.

How the models are made

All have a softwood chassis of pine or deal. Most body sides are tempered hardboard, as are the floors, but bonnet lids are metal – either aluminium or or nickel-silver sheet. Rounded corners are of timber beading, usually hardwood. Small details are made of anything which suits from my huge boxes of bits – parts of old pens, pieces of metal or plastic, nuts and bolts, tubes and so on. Sticks of solder are good to file into manifolds, carburetors and similar. Windscreen frames are either brass sheets and strips, or latterly in sheet polystyrene plastic.

Parts which I can’t make are brought-in, such as wheels, tyres, mirrors, lights, and badges.

Glues used vary from white PVA (Woodworking Glue) through super glue, Scotch glue and others. “JB Kwik” two pack epoxy is also very useful stuff – a combined glue and filler.

Why the models are made

This is simple. I like Four by Fours and these time consuming projects are my retirement hobby. The initial research is part of the fun. This can include buying books, acquiring copies of sales brochures on eBay. In the case of the Land Rover (To be shown in a later article) I measured and photographed the real thing.

The great thing about scratch-building is that it allows you to model any prototype in any colour and to whatever scale you choose.

1965 Hotchkiss-Willys French Army Jeep.

The scratch-built model shown below is to 1:10 scale and took over four hundred hours to complete.

Jeep part built. Softwood bulkhead, front panel with grille tempered hardboard.

 

Steering Wheel – Copper tube rolled into a circle, pen cap as centre, alloy tube spokes pinned to the rim.

 

Hotchkiss-Jeep engine before painting.

 

Hotchkiss-Jeep engine after painting and ready to install.

 

The engine installed in the Jeep.

 

H-W Jeep’s dashboard. Seats are real cloth on frames of coat hanger wire.

 

H-W Jeep toolkit and box. All handmade from tin sheet, aluminium, and wood.
Completed Jeep on a “French picnic” diorama. Biot is a village where the Jeep’s owner lives, MAR reader Jean-Louis Pothin. The model is based on his real Jeep.
Salesman showing the jeep

 

Lifting the Driver’s seat to show the fuel cap.

 

At the picnic. The figure is to the correct scale converted from a toy WWF wrestler.
 
Checking the engine.

Future articles from Robert will cover the following vehicles: Toyota Land Cruiser FJ25 1958; Datsun Patrol L-60 1965; and the Land Rover Defender Heritage Edition 2016.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page,  or email us at maronlineeditor @ gmail.com.