Category Archives: 1:43

1:43 scale

News from the Continent January 2019 – Norev

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

All text by, and copyright of the Author. All photographs provided by the Manufacturer.

In this article I look at the last two Norev releases from 2018. These models are produced in China for France and are diecast unless otherwise noted. 

November 2018 Releases
1:12 Scale

127500 Porsche 917K

Le Mans 24 Hours 1970 – Driven by Siffert and Redman and suffered an engine failure after 12 hours. The picture from Norev is marked to show clearly how large the model is at this scale.


127501 Porsche 917K

Winner of the Le Mans 24 hour race 1970 – Driven by Attwood and Herrmann.


1:18 Scale

185300 Alpine Renault A110 1600S 1971 – blue


183303 Alpine Renault A110 1600S 1971 . white with red striping


185301 Alpine Renault A110 1600S 1971 – Gendarmerie


183268 BMW M535i Saloon 1980 – gold metallic


183593 Mercedes-Benz S600 saoon 1997 – green metallic


183497 Mercedes-AMG GT S 2018 – black metallic


184833 Peugeot 404 saloon 1965 – Antique green


Scale 1:43

153051 Citroen Light 15 saloon 1949 – Dark blue and Cream


158218 Citroen GS 1220 Club 1973 – Tholonet beige metallic


154205 Citroen Xantia 1993 – Mauritius blue


475447 Peugeot 504 Pick-up with canvas cover – clear blue


511317 Renault Duster Oroch 2015 – white


517728 Renault Megane R.S. 2018 – Platinum silver


517732 Renault Scenic 2016 – Cassiopee grey and black


518399 Renault Alaskan Pick-up 2017 – silver


574055 Simca Vedette Marly 1957 – Pale yellow and black


840029 VW Touran 2015 – white


518393 Renault Alaskan Pick-up 2017 – “Fire Brigade”


Norev Classics 1:43 scale

CL2711 Ford Thunderbird 1960 – adriatic green


CL2712 Ford Thunderbird 1960 – aquamarine


1:87 scale

517818 Alpine A310 1977 – Alpine blue


574116 Matra-Simca Bagheera 1975 – Sun yellow


451731 Panhard PL 17 saloon 1961 – Atlantide blue


518582 Renault Galion 1963 Brewery La Meuse with bottle crates


518583 Renault Galion 1963 Brewery Jean Renard with barrels


530262 IVECO Bus Crossway LE 2014 “Car du Rhone”


530263 IVECO Bus Urbanway 2014 “TCL”


December 2018 Releases

1:18 Scale

183224 BMW M1 1980 – blue


181592 Citroen DS 21 Break 1970 – Bordeaux


183400 Mercedes-Benz 190SL 1955 – blue


183567 Mercedes-Benz 300 CE Cabriolet 1990 – Bornite metallic


185169 Renault Dauphine 1958 – Medicis black


1:43 Scale

517863 Alpine A110 2017 – white and blue test version


830074 Audi 200 Quattro 1989 – white


270321 Bentley Continental GT coupe 2018 – silver


270061 Jaguar E-Type Coupe 1964 – grey


351305 Mercedes-Benz CLS-Class 2018 – ruby red metallic


351175 Mercedes-Benz Sprinter 2018 – silver


475825 Peugeot 508 SW GT 2018 – Amazonite grey


475626 Peugeot 508 SW GT 2018 – Pearl white


517791 Renault Megane Estate 2016 – Glacier white


517799 Renault Megane Estate 2016 – red


517963 Renault Symbioz Salon of Francoforte 2017


517962 Renault R.S. 2017 Vision Salon of ShangHai 2017


840096 Volkswagen Corrado G80 1990 – silver


517796 Renault Megane Estate 2016 “Douanes – Customs”


517798 Renault Megane Estate 2016 “Douanes – Customs” – red and yellow stripes

517794 Renault Megane Estate 2016 – “Police Municipale”


517795 Renault Megane Estate 2016 – “Police Municipale Intercommunale”


MINIJET Scale 1:64

310908 Peugeot 508 SW 2018 – white


310904 Renault Symbioz 2017 – copper


310905 Renault R.S. 2017 – black and gold


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Autocult News December 2018/January 2019

By Maz Woolley

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

December 2018

A glitch means that the December announcement by AutoCult did not arrive in the editor’s email. As there were some interesting models announced we have summarised them here.

#05024 Bentley Type R Gooda

This model is of a sports racer built on a Bentley R type chassis in 1966. It was created for Robert (Bob) Gooda by Peel Coachworks who fitted it with a shorter fastback body with a significantly lower weight, Bob Gouda gave the racer its only public outing at the Bentley Driver’s Club race that was held at the Silverstone circuit in August of 1967. In the hands of co-owner Brian Dumps, the car started with race number 21 and did its laps on the wet racetrack.


#06028 Skoda 440 Spartak Polytex

In 1955 Škoda launched the Type 440 sedan and it remained in production with evolutionary upgrades until 1971. Once in production an idea was developed to build a sports version and Czeck architect Otakar Diblik was commissioned to design a suitable car body.

The new body was in fibreglass hand laid in one piece. The doors and hood were formed as separate pieces fitted to the main body. A removable roof was fitted that used Plexiglass, which was completely clear. With a total weight of only 56 kg (123.2 pounds), the body was very light. The prototype used the standard 1,089cc Skoda four cyclinder engine with only 40HP and the car struggled to go faster than 70MPH. The warping of the body lead to the exrcise being consigned to history and the project car was left in a boiler room. Today, the prototype has been restored in a form very close to the original, although the roof is different.


#09009 Berggren Future Car

In 1951 28 year old Swede Sigvard Berggren started to create a car based upon his own futuristic vision. The base was a chassis from a 1938 Dodge originally used on a taxi. Berggren and his assistant, Lennart Josefson, welded a tubular structure made from lightweight steel tube based on contemporary aircraft construction. The framework also acted as a roll cage in the event of an accident. Shaped body panels were fitted over the steel structure and the result looked like an aircraft without wings. The driver sat ahead of the front wheels and the large air intakes fitted to each side provided cooling for the 100HP flathead Ford V-8 engine.

As often happens, the novelty wore off and the owner lost interest with the car being passed to the Museum Svedinos in Ugglarp, Sweden.


January 2019

The announcements for the first release of 2019 are another set of curiosities. Ranging from the streamlined Horch 930 S Stromlinie through a Cadillac Coupe de Ville prototype from Raymond Loewy to a South American small series car the FNM Alfa Romeo Furia G.


Horsch 930S Streamliner

Initially shown at the 1939 Berlin Motor Show this vehicle showcased Horsch ability to create a streamliner, a style that was very fashionable in Germany due to the new Autobahns which allowed journeys to be made at high average speeds. The car was fitted with luxury touches like a radio and a sink!

The Second World War stopped production after two or three were made and a couple with modified front ends were built from parts in 1945. But at that point the Zwickau was part of the DDR and such luxury cars were no longer any priority for the newly nationalised car industry.


Cadillac Coupe de Ville prototype Raymond Loewy

Raymond Loewy the well know US car designer designed this car to appear at the 1959 Paris motor show. Based on a standard Cadillac Coupe de Ville the cars body work was largely re-created in only a few days by a French coachbuilder Pichon-Parat. After the show Loewy drove the car round Europe bringing it back to the US. The car has recently been fully restored to show condition.


FNM Alfa Romeo Furia G.

FNM ( Fábrica Nacional de Motores ) made Alfa Romeo cars under license in their factory in Rio de Janiero. With models based on the 1900 saloon being a strong seller in the local market. In 1968 Alfa Romeo actually bought FNM from the Brazilian state.

The Furia was made after came about after a tie-up with
Tony Bianca of Comionauto another local factory, who made his own sports model to compete in Brazilian races. The Alfa tie-in was based on the FNM 2000 chassis and a handful of prototypes were made of this pretty car before Cominauto terminated the project.

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Atlas Dinky Deluxe 530 Citroën DS23

By Maz Woolley

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

My latest shipment from Atlas is a replica of French Dinky 530 DS 23 Citroën which was originally made in Spain by Pilen for Dinky from 1970. Whilst the earlier 530 Citroën DS 19 was sold by UK Dinky the DS 23 never was.

The model is finished in metallic red with a matt black roof which is a good replica of the only colour the original was made in. The original model was sold for just two years. The box replicates the late style box with a drawing of the model but no scenic background. Unusually the picture matches the model colour pretty well.

The DS 23 car was introduced in 1972 though the faired in front headlights making the streamlined shape even more attractive than before came in 1967 in the DS21 Dinky never modelled. In most respects the car remained unchanged from the DS21 except for the increase in engine size to 2.3 litres. The model was launched in 1973 and was withdrawn in 1975 giving it a short production life.

The Atlas model is a good replica though the front wings have clear vertical mould lines which presumably were where the front end was modified for the DS 23 tool. Unfortunately the reference pictures that I can see of the original dinky casting are not clear enough to see of this was there on the original mould.

The base is clearly marked as Atlas and licensed by Mattel as usual and states the 1:43 scale used for the model. The base is metal but my source books suggest that the base may have been made in plastic on the original.

Opening bonnet and boot are included which are good close fits though the bonnet will not stay open without being held.

The paint and limited mask spraying are all well carried out.

All in all a rather nice model of a DInky from the last years of Dinky France.


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Abrex Cararama Lancia Ypsilon

By Maz Woolley

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

The second generation Lancia Ypsilon was Introduced in 2003 and was produced until 2011. Like the Alfa Romeo MiTo it was a small three door car designed appeal to buyers who wanted something with a bit more style than the standard Fiat group offerings and who were prepared to pay a premium for it.

It quickly became the best selling car in the Lancia range with an annual production of over 60,000 units. Initially assembled at the Fiat plant in Melfi in June 2005 production was moved to Sicily at the plant in Termini Imerese Palermo until the factory was closed by Fiat. The car has a three-door body and the design was said to be inspired by the historic Lancia Ardea.

The unitary body used a shortened version of the Fiat Group B platform which underpinned the Fiat Punto , Fiat Idea and Lancia Musa. The engine is transversely mounted at the front, with front wheel drive. The usual smaller capacity Fire and Multijet engines were on offer. 

The interior had plastic inserts on door panels and the instrument panel is covered with Airtex fabric, leather or Alcantara depending on the model. There is two-tone upholstery and plastic inserts mimic aluminium. 

I don’t believe that the car was officially imported into the UK as the Lancia brand was withdrawn from the UK market in 1995 and has never re-appeared though the third generation Ypsilon which was made in Poland and based on the smaller Panda/500 minicar chassis was sold here badged as a Chrysler until 2015 when Chrysler pulled everything other than Jeep out of the UK market.

The model shown here is branded Abrex/Cararama and is diecast to 1:43 scale in China presumably at the Hongwell plant in Hong Kong. It is packed simply in a cardboard box with clear plastic panel to view the model and when it can be found in the UK it is often sold for significantly less than an Oxford Diecast 1:43 model. Like most Cararama models it is an excellent casting which has been well finished and detailed.

Looking at the front the Italian number plate with the EU symbol is very neatly printed as is the Lancia badge on the nicely reproduced grille. The main and subsidiary lights at the front are well modelled and separately inserted. 

The interior is a black plastic moulding which has a lot of detail with a good dashboard and central console as well as nicely moulded door cards. There is no printing to highlight the interior and no attempt is made to provide two tone upholstery.

Along the side the wing mirrors are beautifully moulded and the alloy wheels well captured down to the small Lancia roundel printed in the centre. The black window surrounds and pillars are nicely done, printed on the plastic glazing insert. The momo DESIGN logo is neatly printed on the B pillar. The door handles are moulded into the casting but with undercutting giving them a realistic shape.

The anthracite coloured silk effect roof and rear hatch is painted really effectively and the roof has the typical Fiat group small aerial to the rear.

At the rear the high level brake light, number plate and Lancia badging is all printed finely. The rear lights are separately inserted and all painted the correct colours on the reverse.

Altogether an excellent budget model of an interesting car. 


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News from the Continent January 2019 – Schuco

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

The models shown are the final release from Schuco in 2018. All are made in China for Germany. The models are made in various scales as stated below and the Pro ranges have much more detail and consequently a rather higher price.

EDITION PRO.R43

450903500 Aston Martin DB6 “Shooting Brake” – dark green


450903900 Volkswagen Beetle 1600S “Super-Bug” – red


EDITION 1:32

450772800 John Deere 5125R tractor with front loader


EDITION 1:87

452633700 Volkswagen Transporter T1c bus black/red


452633800 Volkswagen Transporter T1c Camper – green/grey


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Making a Jaguar XF Sportbreak

By John F. Quilter

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

Picture copyright of Car Magazine

A few years ago Jaguar launched the estate version of the midsize XF saloon which was introduced around 2010. One of my model vendors had Whitebox 1:43 scale models of the XFR at a bargain price and combined with that, and the fact I did not have a model of the Sportbreak, Jaguar’s name for their estate, I decided to make one myself. Currently no model maker does a Sportbreak so my Jaguar collection was lacking.

The process, which replicates to some extent things I have done before, entailed first, a complete disassembly and strip down of the red Whitebox XFR. Off came the base plate, interior, lights and in this case even the door handles which are not cast into the model. Then out came the jeweler’s saw to cut off the rear quarter of the top and the boot lid area.

I was in luck on this model as Jaguar’s massive sales brochure had outstanding photos of both the saloon and the estate as 90 degree side shots, 90 degree front and rear shots. These, and photos found on Google are invaluable in getting the shape and details correct. The rear portion of the diecast roof which was not cut off was gently bent upwards to replicate the angle of the estate roof. Then using sheet aluminum an extension of the roof was created and new side window frames from the B pillar back were cut out and shaped.

Since the Sportbreak has a large glass roof I filled in the existing smaller sunroof opening. To create the glass roof effect I simply painted this in gloss black as these roof panels are heavily tinted for sun protection.

A spoiler, (or is it a rear mounted sun visor?) was made from a section of aluminum sheet. I noted that the Sportbreak is from the “facelift” XF so that meant that some details had to be changed, minor shape differences to the tail lamps, relocation of the exhaust pipes, the shape of the front valance side vents and the vent below the central grill. The vents on the bonnet had to be eliminated and the front wing vents reshaped. Side window glazing was some clear plastic from a food container and since this was flat, presented no special issues. The rounded rear tailgate window was also a piece of repurposed food container with a suitable curvature.

My spare parts inventory contained a black rear window wiper that fit well. Photos from the sales brochure showed an interior and seats in two tone black and grey so the stock Whitebox all black interior was enhanced with some grey panels to the seats.

Final paint was with a “rattle can” of Krylon white, finished a few days later with a clear coat of Testors Model Master clear gloss enamel. This is a new technique to me and it does give a superior finish almost to the extent of a factory built model. One must remember that the gloss enamel takes a number of days to fully dry so one must resist the temptation to start handling the model for a number of days after painting.

So this Sportbreak represents the second production Jaguar estate, the first being the X Type which was done in 1:43 scale by Premium X. It appears that now many of the current Jaguar and Land Rover models are being done by TSM, (True Scale Models) who I’m told are a client of Premium Collectibles Trading (Editor: the group which produces Ixo and Premium X brands as well as making models under contract for many others like DeAgostini and White Box). In 1:43 scale they currently make the two crossover Jaguars the F Pace, and E Pace, as well as the electric I Pace. Time will tell if they launch a Sportbreak making my effort redundant.


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News from the Continent January 2019 – M4 Models

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

All text by, and copyright of the Author. All photographs provided by the Manufacturer.

M2 Models are the group responsible for Art, Best and Rio models. These are all made to 1:43 scale in Italy. The models shown in this article were due for release in December 2018.

ART

ART396 Ferrari 860 Monza

This car was second at the 1000 km at the Nurburgring in 1956 driven by Fangio and Castelotti Chassis #0602


ART397 Ferrari 166 MM Barchetta

This car was raced at the Mille Miglia in 1949 driven by Taruffi and Nicolini


BEST

BEST9025/2 Ferrari 250 LM

This Ferrari came in 6th in the Le Mans 24 hour race in 1965 driven by A.Noller and D.Spoerry


BEST9257/2 Porsche 908/02 Flounder

This car was run in the Le Mans 24 hour race in 1972 where it did not finish after its involvement in an accident. It was driven by Stuppacher and Roser.


BEST9732 Porsche 550 RS

This car took part in the Governator´s Trophy in 1958 driven by F.Campell


BEST9733 Ferrari 330 GTS 1967

This is a model of a Ferrari that would cost several million at auction. Here it is painted in an unusual Hazelnut metallic colour.


RIO

RIO4583 Lamborghini Miura P400 1966

Styled by Bertone this model is the classic Muira coloured in the bright orange popular in the late sixties, here called Miura orange.


# 22537/22538

RIO4584 Lamborghini Miura P400S 1968

Again styled by Bertone this later Miura in lime green has the modified chrome headlight surrounds fitted from 1968 on and the chrome window surrounds introduced that year as well. The model marks the 50th anniversary of this car often called the Muira S to distinguish it from its predecessor.


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Hachette Italy World Buses Part 22

By Fabrizio Panico

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

Numbers 64 to 66.

This article features three more European buses, and two of them have already been seen in another form. As predicted we see more mould re-use. It’s logical, and thankfully Hachette has made an effort so that the models are not differentiated by the livery alone. All of them are from the Italian Hachette partwork “Autobus dal mondo”, a collection of eighty 1:43 scale bus models, very similar to the French one “Autobus et autocars du monde”, produced in Bangladesh for Ixo.

No. 64 (no. 87 in the French collection) AEC Regent III RT London Country 1947 – We have already seen the AEC history and its Regent III RT (see part one, no. 3) and Regal III (see part six, no. 16). Its origins can be traced to the LGOC (London General Omnibus Company) which started producing its own motor omnibuses in 1909, and in 1912 was reorganised and set up as a separate concern for bus manufacturing, named Associated Equipment Company. The AEC Regent III was a double-decker bus chassis, introduced in 1938, and usually fitted with AEC’s 9.6-litre diesel engine at the front delivering 115HP. It was fitted with ‘Wilson‘ preselective gearbox and air-pressure operated brakes, with bodies from Park Royal (this model), Metro Cammell Weymann and so on.

Better known in the classic red Central London livery, the RT started a second life in the dark green colours of Green Lines when the new Routemaster started its service in Central London. After a first positive test with eight lines, in 1930 LGOC started a regular service in the London suburbs with a separate company, Green Line Coaches, identified by the green livery. Its fleet was composed mainly of single decker buses, but after the Second World War many Regent III RT changed colours due to their replacement with the new Routemaster. In 1970 the Green Line Coaches came under the control of the London Country Bus Services until 1986 when the transport sector was privatised across UK.

The scale model is quite heavy, as already seen in the previous red London version, with a metal diecast body and a well detailed plastic chassis fitted with a separate silver exhaust. Aside from the livery and the lettering, the only significant difference seems to be the addition of two small turn signals under the front destination board, listing a few borough and small towns in the London commuter belt.

The front grille also appears slightly different. As usual many small separate parts are fitted like lights, rear mirrors, a single wiper, front grille, and a fuel cap. The interior is quite basic, and the presence of three metal supports doesn’t help at all. Their presence is not fully justified, the metal body should be strong enough without them. A few small ads on the rear side help to liven up the sober livery. No apparent differences to the French edition. A good reproduction, but a bit disappointing, many would have preferred a more common Green Lines single-decker bus.


No. 65 (no. 88 in the French collection) Mercedes Benz O 305 Frankfurt 1979 – We have met the German giant many times : the gargantuan 1938 O 10000 (see part one, no. 2), the midget 1936 Lo 3100 (see part four, no. 11) and the bright 1972 O 302 (see part eleven, no. 31), all of them more touring coaches than urban buses. But we have already met also the O 305, even if in the “French edition” by Heuliez (see part fifteen, no. 45), when the always very strong French nationalistic spirit pragmatically preferred the Mercedes O 305 to the Berliet and Saviem offers, but required that “all the buses exported to France to be bodied by Heuliez”. The Mercedes Benz O 305 was the product of the standardisation requested by the VoV (Verband Offentlicher Verkehrsbetriebe), the Association of German Public Transports, looking for a low floor 11 metres bus. Designed for use as a single-decker bus, it was later redesigned to accommodate double-decker bodies.

It was built as a complete bus or as a chassis only and more than 16,000 were made from 1969 to 1987, of which almost 4,800 were chassis only units. The engine was an horizontal six in-line diesel producing 210HP. This was positioned at the rear of the bus and was very reliable and almost noiseless. The body had a squared shape with large windows, round headlamps and only two doors, tickets being issued by the driver. Two interior platforms existed in the centre and to the rear. This allowed more than 100 passengers to be carried, of which 41 were seated. The O 305 was replaced in 1983 by the new O 405 to be followed in 1997 by the O 530 (Citaro), a real revolution.

The model is shaped accurately and the orange and light brown livery appears authentic and neatly printed. The body is plastic, as usual, with a metal baseplate with limited detail. A comparison with the Heuliez version identifies a different roof as well as different front and rear sections, though the sides are almost identical. Many small plastic separate parts are fitted, like wipers, mirrors, lights, and bumpers. It is fitted with accurate Frankfurt registration plates, while the destination board reads Monchhofstrasse. Monchhhof is a business park near the Frankfurt airport. There is only a basic interior, but a very detailed dashboard is fitted. On the sides ther are two large adverts for the “Deutscher Herold”, an insurance group whose origins can be traced to the 1922 German Burial Insurance Association of Berlin, an association of mutual insurance to allow the cost of burial as insurance benefits (useful, but a bit lugubrious). There is an added rear panel, simulating the access to the engine which is not reproduced. There are no apparent differences to the French edition. A nice reproduction of an emblematic German bus.


No. 66 (no. 89 in the French collection) Chausson APU/53 1953 – Obviously we have already met Chausson and its products : the 1950 APH (see part five, no. 14) and the 1956 ANG coach (see part eighteen, no. 53). Based in the Paris region from 1907, supplier of components for the automotive industry. In the 1930s Chausson started producing car and unitary bus bodies too. During the post war boom Chausson supplied thousands of buses to French cities, but in 1959 Saviem acquired all their buses activities and Chausson left that market. After the Second World War the RATP needed to replenish its fleet in a hurry and Chausson was among its main suppliers. Its APH, with unitary metal bodywork instead of the traditional use of a separate chassis, allowed a light and more efficient vehicle. Chausson developed from its first 1942 prototype the APE (petrol Panhard engine), followed by the APH (diesel Panhard engine) and the AH (petrol Hotchkiss engine). To accommodate the longer Hotchkiss engine it was necessary to extend its front cover, and to standardise it : so was born the ‘nez de cochon’ or ‘pig’s nose’. It was a success, but by 1952 the AP52 was updated with a new body style featuring a flat front, and windows added to the curved part of the roof to improve the brightness of the vehicle (the high floor limited the height of the roof).

The following APU/53 addressed another problem : the reduced size of the doors hindered the entry and exit of the passengers. A third central door was added, and the rear one enlarged. The engine was now a seven litres straight six diesel by Hispano-Hercules, developing 121HP. The roof height was improved in 1956 with the APVU, developed in five successive series, employed by the RATP mainly on suburban lines.

A plastic body and metal baseplate are used for the model sporting the classic RATP livery: dark green and cream. Unusually the baseplate doesn’t have any detail, only an added black exhaust. The nice side windows are well detailed. There is a basic interior, but the conductor and driver areas are well modelled. The added front lights, rear mirrors and the three wipers are all well done. Also well reproduced are the doors and the front Chausson logo. There are no registration plates which is normal for RATP vehicles. The destination board reads “Place du Pantheon”, which is near the Sorbonne University and the Luxembourg Gardens. The 84 line connects Place du Pantheon to the Porte de Champerret, on the north side of the Boulevard Périphérique. There are no apparent differences to the French edition. A model of a well known, and loved, Parisian bus.


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News from the Continent December 2019 – Schuco

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

Two releases of models took place in November 2018. Each is described separately below. Schuco-Dickie are a long established German Group which also produces Solido models following their acquisition by the Group. Models are diecast in China for Germany unless stated otherwise. The ranges shown vary in scale and in detail with the Pro ranges being the most detailed and most expensive.

PICCOLO

450533600 Volkswagen T1 microbus “Surfer-Bus”



EDITION 1:43

450185600 Piccolo Gift-Set B


450292900 Hanomag L28 Delivery van “Kreidler” with Kreidler Florett motorcycle and driver figurine

450293900 Hanomag L28 Delivery van “Horex” with Horex motorcycle and driver figurine

450249600 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gull-wing coupe, dark blue


450368900 Set “Volkswagen T1b Samba bus, box van; Pick up with crew cab and Pick up


450374300 Volkswagen Transporter T1b Samba bus, red and beige



EDITION 1:32

450769900 Lanz Bulldog tractor with roof and manure barrel trailer


450781300 Fendt Favorit 622 LS tractor


450781500 Fendt 211 Vario tractor, green


450781700 Fendt 211 V Vario tractor, green


450765900 Set “Legendary tractors” – 3 models in a wooden box



EDITION PRO.R32

450903600 Steyr 1300 System Dutra tractor



EDITION 1:18

450041000 BMW Isetta Export motorcoupe, red/beige


450041100 BMW Isetta Export motorcoupe, blue/grey


450033300 Porsche 550A Spyder”Edition 70 Years of Porsche”, white



EDITION PRO.R18


450008600 Porsche Master tractor, red



EDITION 1:64

452019300 Set ‘Volkswagen Transporter T1’ ( three models )



EDITION 1:87

452632800 Volkswagen Transporter T1c box van with trailer, loaded with Porsche tractor


452634100 Mercedes-Benz O 321 Bus “German Bundespost”



MILITARY 1:87

452636360 MAN 7t gl. KAT1 Rocket launcher Lars II, German Bundeswehr

452636400 MAN 5t gl KAT1 tank truck with spots-camouflage



AVIATION 1:250

403551694 Junkers Ju52/3m


403551682 Ju-Air, Junkers Ju52/3m



AVIATION 1:600

403551691 Boeing 777-300 Air France ‘Olympia 2024’

Second Release November 2018

PICCOLO

450559500 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Piccolo Assembling Box ‘The little Gullwing-Mechanic’



EDITION 1:43

450310300 Mercedes-Benz Lo 2750 Flatbed truck “German Reichspost”


450310400 Mercedes-Benz Lo 2750 Flatbed truck ‘Christmas 2018’


450367600 Porsche 911 S – sepia brown



EDITION PRO.R43

450904100 Magirus Deutz O 6500 ‘Soccer World Champion Germany 1954’



EDITION 1:32

450769300 Lanz Ackerluft Tractor with half track


450778600 Güldner G60A tractor with roof and front loader


450776000 John Deere Harvester 1270G 8W with log


450779900 Hanomag Robust 900 tractor with front loader



Edition 1:18

450011700 K.L. Bulldog tractor – red


450011900 Lanz Bulldog halftrack -blue


450014700 Mercedes-Benz Unimog U401 with wild boar – green



EDITION PRO.R18

450006800 BMW 850i Cabriolet – red

450006900 BMW 850i Cabriolet – blue



AVIATION 1:600

403551690 Airbus A330-300 “KLM”


403551693 Boeing 777-300 “Japan Air Force 1”


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Alfa Romeo Guilia Part Two

By Robin Godwin

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

As alluded to in Part 1, next up is the Politoys Giulia TI in 1:41 scale plastic. Most collectors know that Politoys started in plastic, and had a brief foray into “Fibre-glass” (actually resin and I’m pretty sure there were no “glass fibers” used) before settling on diecast metal. I’m not sure where the scale of 1:41 comes from; it could be as simple as a response to the use of the scale by INGAP. In any case, Politoys labelled many of their early plastic vehicles as 1:41, but issued many of the models in totally different scales. The early “Veicoli Militari” series is a prime example (covered in an early print MAR). That said, the Giulia seems to be correct in scale as it compares favourably to the INGAP, and is slightly larger than their 1:43 metal version issued a couple of years later. (I must emphasise that I am not a diehard scale checker).

Rampini lists 1964 as the year of issue for the plastic Giulia. I don’t think it captures the style of the original as well as the INGAP, nor do any of the subsequent metal issues from Politoys. To me, the roof is too tall, making the windows too big. It includes many of the features prevalent on contemporary models: glazing, a full interior, jewelled headlights, separate chrome pieces, and suspension. There are no opening features, likely due to strength considerations of the small plastic components that would have been involved. I have always been impressed with the stability of the plastic used by early Politoys. This one features no warping at all, but does suffer from some post-manufacture shrinkage evident in the slight deformation seen in the door panels.


Politoys, left, roof too high. INGAP, too low. A Goldilocks model (‘just right’) comes later

Roof appears too tall. Plastic shrinkage has led to deformation on door panels

It would seem that Politoys quickly discovered the wisdom of diecasting in metal, especially as the toy car market was now demanding a variety of operating features and manufacturers were competing with more and more opening parts. The plastic models had no opening panels; the ‘fibreglass’ models had some (and note, there was no ‘fibreglass’ Giulia), but the big change came with metal toys, and the Politoys M series of models in “proper” 1:43 scale, which first appeared in 1965. There was certainly some overlap between all three mediums (plastic, fibreglass, and metal), but metal was the future.

A completely remastered Giulia TI appeared in metal in 1966, as number 523, with opening front doors (half doors, with no window frames), hood and trunk. Typical of the diecasters art of the time, the opening features spoil the lines somewhat. In reality, the rear window is a beautiful wrap around affair, but Politoys managed to square it off at the corners, which really detracts from the rear view. The A pillars are sloped back a little too far; the real vehicle had a more upright windshield profile. Alfa Romeo and Giulia TI are cast into the back of the trunk lid, albeit, overscale. A Carabinieri version was issued in 1967 as number 531 in the M series, with antenna and roof light. The base casting was changed to reflect the new number.


Politoys 523, rear. A move to metal and 1:43 scale didn’t necessarily improve the overall representation of the Giulia. Exaggerated slope of front windscreen evident on the metal model

“Squaring” of rear window can be seen on the metal version at right

Politoys 523, left and Carabinieri version, 531 on the right. Same casting except for antenna and light holes, and model number on the base was changed

Polistoys introduced the Penny range in 1966, about the same time as the Impy Roadmasters Super Car range from Lone Star. These cars provided competition for Matchbox and were done to a constant scale of 1:66, unlike the other two whose scales varied. The Pennys had lots of opening features, but were not nearly as feature laden as the Impys. Shortly after their introduction, the range was rationalised, and simplified with the loss of opening features. An early catalogue illustrates (as in a diagram) model #0/41 Giulia with opening doors, along with #0/47, a Carabinieri version. However, it was caught up in the rationalisation process and was eventually released in 1968 (after Politoys had become Polistil) as #0/201-A. The Carabinieri version was never released. It is easy to tell that the model is a Guilia, but that is about as generous as one can get. The front windshield is even more sloped than the 1:43 versions, and the interior lacks a steering wheel. Oddly, bonnet and boot shut lines stand proud, while the door lines are indented, with bigger gaps for the front doors. It is possible that the dies had been cut for the original plan of opening front doors, but were reworked when the range was rationalised. Rear and front bumpers, along with grill and headlights are all one chromed casting, making the front end appear way too bright. Wheels are common across the range, a generic (and wrong for this model) set of simulated wire wheels.


Front windshield slope on the Penny Giulia is just plain bad modelling. Note more pronounced front door gaps. Front door side trim is misaligned with the rest of the trim on the 1:43 version

Politoys/Polistil produced other Giulias as well – a 1:20 scale plastic model, a slightly-smaller-than-1:43 estate (station wagon, or familiare), mostly in emergency/police versions (the estate was bodied by Carrozzeria Colli of Milan) in the AE series from the 70s (a nasty model all round, with bad whizzwheels), and a 1:55 Nuova Giulia 1300 from the RJ Series dating from the 80s, also with whizzwheels. It should be noted that many early Politoys dies travelled to Mexico, and were subsequently produced as McGregor Politoys. Plastic, resin and metal models were included, as well as Penny. I have no conclusive evidence to prove that any Giulia die travelled to Mexico, but a Dutch Alfa Romeo Forum shows photos of a McGregor Politoys 1:43 Giulia Carabinieri in its box, but not the base of the model. Another site, worthpoint.com (similar to eBay), shows a McGregor Politoys #523 sedan exactly the same as the one pictured above, but the description goes on to say that McGregor imported Made in Italy Politoys, and boxed and sold them as McGregors for awhile. This model was one of those.   

To be continued…


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