Category Archives: 1:24

More on Merit 1:24 Scale Kits

By Jerry J. Broz

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

Merit 1:24 Scale Model Car Superkits, Plastic Model
Car book, and Merit printed-on wheels spoke replacement.

In MAR article “Merit 1:24 scale model car kits“, re-printed from Veloce Today on-line magazine, Aldo Zana writes about a British company which, in 1957 under the trading name Merit, produced precise 1:24 scale models of fourteen Formula One racing cars spanning the years from 1948 to 1956. The article also shows the colourful Merit box-lid which was the same for the featured Formula One model cars.

The next two cars were marketed individually, in separate boxes (shown below), as “Merit Lago-Talbot Superkit” (1949 Talbot-Lago T-26) and as “Merit Alfa-Romeo Superkit” (1950 Alfa-Romeo 158).

Both kits were marketed as “Superkits” and include the engine as well as a removable engine bay cover. Only one car (Lago-Talbot) is shown in Aldo Zana’s article.

The “Plastic Model Cars” book, written by model car collector Cecil Gibson, who authored numerous books on model cars, was published in 1962 and is a good companion to the Merit model car kits. Even though the book thoroughly and completely describes how to detail the Merit model car kits, it is not considered an official publication of Merit models.

The book includes well-written chapters covering Modelling, General Modelling Techniques, Choosing the Model, Painting, Storage & Display, Detail Work, and more. Although the book is long out of print it is still available from time to time on eBay and other
Internet websites. The Plastic Model Cars book should be a part of any Merit Model Car collector’s Collection.

All of the Merit 1:24 scale model car kits were injection moulded in one colour (bodies, tires, wheels and all other parts), and  in the colour of manufacturer or race team. (Pictured below, is the Simca-Gordini that was moulded in French blue).

The quality of the moulding and the fit of all parts is impressive considering these kits were made in the 1950s and 1960s. The Merit 1:24 scale model car kits are excellent models, and incredibly accurate representation of the actual cars. The only parts which have visibly aged are the decals and the glue capsule that was included with each kit.

Due to their age, the water slide decals are likely brittle and not usable; however, some of them can be salvaged. The Micro Scale product “Decal Film” can be used to recover the era type racing numbers, emblems, and dashboard gauge decals. Brush the film two or three times across the decals, let the coat dry, cut out the desired image and then it can be applied like a new decal. The years old glue, however, cannot be used and should be discarded.

The Merit model car kits, accurately reproduced with shiny moulded-in finish, are excellent base kits for detailing. With after-market products, photo-etched parts, and model kit manufacturers’ add-on parts, you can create a model car masterpiece.

One of the kits’ original parts, the transparent celluloid disk with printed-on wheel spokes, must be replaced with a moulded plastic spoke wheels. These are shown in the above picture of the Simca-Gordini.  The moulded wheels which fit the Merit 1:24 scale model cars are produced by Fujimi as Wire Mesh Silver Narrow
17 inch wheels
.


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1963 Mustang II Concept from Automodello

By Karl Schnelle

All text and photographs provided by the Manufacturer.

With the stunning debut of the Mustang I concept in the summer of 1962, Ford had a problem, and became—in a sense—a victim of its own success. The little 2-seat, mid-engine sports car had generated tremendous excitement, but it was essentially a hand built experimental prototype sports racer, New Ford boss Lee Iacocca had greenlighted production on a sporty little production car called the Mustang, but it would be based on Ford Falcon mechanicals and share virtually nothing with that original concept but the name. Ford needed to direct all the excitement over the prototype toward a more production-ready version of the Mustang, and thus the 1963 Mustang II Concept was born.

Development on the production Mustang was well underway in preparation for its April 1964 release, so unlike the traditional concept car, the Mustang II would not shape the street car’s configuration—it would follow and foreshadow it. That was its purpose: to bridge consumer expectations and get the public ready to accept the production pony. The Mustang II Concept was actually built on one of the production Mustang prototypes by Dearborn Steel Tubing (DST)—a fabrication company Ford had used for this type of job previously.

DST yanked off the bumpers and designed a special front grille and valence, establishing the corralled pony grille trim that would be such an iconic part of the production ’64 model. Special spear-shaped front fenders were designed and incorporated mesh-covered headlight recesses. In fact, that valence and the front fenders are all a single piece of steel grafted onto the front of the production-spec Mustang. The rear got similar treatment, with the rear cap being extended, the triple taillights elongated into the lower valence and quad exhaust tips extended through it.

The car started life as a notchback hardtop, but DST sliced it into a roadster that mimicked the look of the production convertible, but no folding top was installed. Instead they built a one-off removable hardtop. Under the hood sat a largely stock 271hp Hi-Po 289 with a few tricks to enhance showmanship, like trick lifters specifically designed to make the Mustang rumble like a race car.

Working in close concert with Ford, and following its 1:24 replica of the 1962 Mustang I Concept, Automodello now offers collectors the chance to own another essential chapter of the Mustang story rendered in 1:24 resin with photoetched metal detail and trim.

The Mustang II Concept, as it appeared in 1963 in white with blue stripes, will be produced in 299 pieces as the Standard Edition, while a special Tribute Edition specifically authorized by Ford comes in just 50 hand-numbered examples wearing Tribute Red. Both include a removable hardtop.

For MAR Online subscribers, a coupon code is available for 10% off, for these two models – 24MustangMAR – that is good through May 31, 2019.

1978 Lincoln Continental from Automodello

By Karl Schnelle

All text and photographs provided by the Manufacturer.

1978 marked the 75th Anniversary of the Ford Motor Company and, to commemorate it, they released the most extravagant Lincoln to date: the Mark V Diamond Jubilee Edition. Released in just two exclusive colors—Diamond Blue and Jubilee Gold—the special editions were loaded with all of the Mark V’s options as standard equipment, making them the first Lincolns to top $20,000 in base price.

They also had several exclusive features. Front seat passengers were coddled in unique power-adjustable bucket seats, and vinyl covering over the continental spare to match the Landau top. That top includes special coach lamps and unique opera windows with “Jubilee Edition” scripts engraved into them, with the ‘i’ dotted with an authentic diamond chip. 

Automodello has recently released them in 1:24 scale:

  • 24L020 in Diamond Blue, build 175
  • 24L021 in Jubilee Gold, build 175

Both include free worldwide shipping from Automodello. See Diamond Blue and Jubilee Gold for details.


Merit 1:24 Scale Racing Car Kits

By Aldo Zana

All text, photographs and models by, and copyright of, Aldo Zana.
Reprinted with permission of VeloceToday.com on-line magazine
.

When the editor of Veloce Today was collecting Merit kits in the late
1950s, he could not have known that another writer-to-be was doing
exactly the same thing, at the same time, but in faraway Italy. His
Italian counterpart, Aldo Zana tells us all about these British models.

The whole range of the Merit 1:24-scale plastic kits assembled and painted in period liveries: mid-Fifties. Front line: British F1 and the Jaguar D-Type. Mid row: Italian F1 and Grand Prix racers and the Lotus 11. Rear row: French racers, Mercedes W196, Cooper 500 MkIX and Aston Martin DB3S.

It was hard times in the second half of the Fifties for European kids in love with Formula One and longing to become part of its world by collecting and playing with model racers. We Italians faced especially limited choices: the hard-to-find die-cast Nigam, the elusive Zax, or the old Mercury racers of the Forties: oddly scaled, with questionable faithfulness and tires fit for an all-terrain army truck. The rise of globalisation brought from the UK to the best Italian toy shops the die-cast Dinky Toys and the first Corgi Toys. The former listed obsolete F1/F2 single seaters of the early Fifties in its catalogue. Corgi featured more updated models of British production: however, merely two, already non-competitive in real life against our all-conquering Ferraris and Maseratis after Mercedes-Benz’ withdrawal in 1955. And they looked too small alongside the Dinkies and Mercuries. And then, out of the blue, cameMerit, although quite difficult to locate among the contemporary fast-growing and highly visible offerings of plastic (polystyrene) kits dominated by the leading US brands of Monogram, Revell, and Aurora.

Italian racers of the Forties and Fifties. From the left: Maserati 250F, Maserati 4CLT/48, Lancia Ferrari, Alfa Romeo 158.

In 1957 Merit produced precise 1:24 scale models of current Formula One protagonists: Lancia-Ferrari V8, Maserati 250F, Gordini T-16, as well as milestones of the pre-1952 F1 seasons: Alfa Romeo 158, Talbot-Lago T26, Maserati 4CLT/48 San Remo”. And thanks to a flurry of new offers in a few months’ span, we could also buy and build the emerging British single-seaters striving for the limelight after a decade of playing second fiddle to the Italians in the form of the Connaught B-Type “Syracuse” 1956, BRM P25 1956, and the Vanwall VW4 1956.

It became easier for Italian kids to become loyal to Merit’s growing offer of racing cars. The company enlarged its range with three sports car icons, all made in the UK: the well-known multiple winner
Jaguar D-Type, the lesser known Aston Martin DB3S and the as yet unknown Lotus Mk XI, a name on the verge of becoming a leader.

All British: the three sports cars in the series. From the left: Aston Martin DB3S, Lotus 11, and Jaguar D in Ecurie Ecosse livery.

The Merit kits came from a company called J & L Randall Ltd., based in the town of Potters Bar, Hertfordshire, north of London. They were all sold in a standard, nondescript box, the same for every model: small and unappealing at a time when competing US brands already showcased their products on box-lids with colourful and attractive art to win the prime spots in shop windows . The only way to select the right Merit kit was a small label glued on one of the narrower sides.

The Alfa Romeo 158 with the standard box in the background. The box was the same for every kit.

They were quite expensive for the period, too: 1,100 Liras, when
the average monthly salary of a worker was about 45,000 Liras.
By comparison, a Mercury die-cast model racer cost 180 Liras and a Dinky 230-250 Liras.

The kits were moulded in flawless plastic; the surface was so clean and regular that it was possible to skip painting the body. It wasn’t a simple task for a kid to smoothly hand brush the Humbrol enamels; airbrushes for modellers were still a long way into the future. The solvent used at that time by Humbrol allowed, nevertheless, a clean and uniform finish even when working with the brush.

The instruction sheet of the 4CLT/48 Maserati. The front side tells in short the history and the races of the real car, the back side presents a clear illustration of the easy assembly procedure.

Assembly was quite straightforward too: the body was split in two halves, top and bottom. Axles and driver seat had to be glued to the bottom half, other details (exhaust pipes, windscreen, dashboard, steering wheel) to the top section, before joining these two sub-assemblies. Each wheel/tire was moulded in two halves and the tire had to be carefully painted matte black. The spokes were a decal (transfer, in British parlance) to be applied on a little transparent celluloid disc, subsequently set onto the outside of the wheel prior to gluing the hub cap. The quality of the decals was only fair and I preferred to avoid them.

The racing number decals were usually quite hard and dry, prone to
cracking. Yet, it was possible to soften them using highly diluted vinyl glue, given the lack of softening liquids on the market. The instruction sheet had a pedantic list of building steps on the front, ending with the painting scheme, but a clear assembly drawing on the back. More interesting was, at the top of the first page, a short presentation of the real car, a summary of its main successes as well as a basic description of its technical characteristics and performance.

Talbot-Lago T26, 1949, one of the two “super” kits featuring engine detail. The body was left unpainted. Note the smoothness of the plastic injection.

Two kits were super-detailed to include the engine and a removable engine bay cover: the 1950 Alfa Romeo 158 and the 1949 Talbot-Lago T-26 4.5 litre. Both were probably made so detailed because the moulds were already available when pressure to launch new models forced the company to simplify and shorten the production cycle.

The whole range of 1956 F1 and Sports cars went on sale in 1957,
a remarkably short time to market: Lancia-Ferrari, Maserati 250F,
BRM P25, Connaught B-Type “Syracuse”, Gordini T16, Vanwall VW4. A very British choice was the addition of the Cooper 500 Mk IX, 1956.

A tribute to the former German dominance was the kit of the Mercedes-Benz W196, the 1954 road-racing version mistakenly presented as the 1955 model. The Maserati 4CLT/48 was another obsolete racer in the series. The kit didn’t have the inner details of the Alfa Romeo and the Talbot-Lago. It was an unusual selection of a car that wasn’t a winner, yet it was well-known being driven by Thailand’s Prince Bira and Brit Reg Parnell.

A real piece of history outside F1 and sports cars, the Cooper 500 Mk IX, 1956, recalls a glorious period of British racing. Body unpainted.

A final touch of class was the colour of the ink used for the instruction sheets: dark red for the Italians, British Racing Green for the British, blue for the French. The Mercedes sheet fell outside the paradigm, printed in dark blue as the historically correct white or silver would have been impossible to read.

The boxes of the later kits contained a small multi-page
educational leaflet on Motor Racing, a more detailed description of the prototype, and a promotional bottom line advertising the brand of motor oil used in races by the car. The leaflet on the Vanwall doubled to eight pages and ended with a tribute to Tony Vanderwell who “raised the prestige of British Automobile Engineering throughout the world”.

The four-page leaflet in the Jaguar D-Type box. A good recap of the car’s history. Britain still ruled. And the following year it also became true in F1.
Below, all fourteen of the Merit models in individual photos. You won’t see this often!
Vanwall VW4, 1956, when the Brits knocked at the forefront of F1. Decals are original.
1956 Lancia Ferrari. The Merit kits was on sale early 1957, a remarkably short time-to-market.
Gordini six-cylinder F2, 1952. Humbrol paint (“Enamel” on the original British tin) to cover the body.
Alfa Romeo 158 with engine cover removed to show the inner details. The other “super” kit together with the Talbot-Lago
Alfa Romeo 158, 1950, hood in place.
Talbot-Lago T26, 1949. A good representation of the engine.
Mercedes W 196, 1954, open wheel version. Decals are original including the chequered cover of the driver’s seat
The diminutive Cooper Mk IX, 1956. The silver exhaust was easier to paint.
Maserati 4CLT/48 in Argentinian livery, as raced by Fangio in Europe.
Aston Martin DB3S, 1956. The yellow trim is an addition of the kit builder.
Connaught B-Type “Syracuse”, 1956. Quite a rare bird in real and scale model worlds.
Lotus 11, 1956. Airbrush repainted after 60 years when the plastic suffered signs of shrinking.
Jaguar D-Type, 1954. The gap at the rear end of the front section of the body is due to having modified the part to make it tilting forward like the real thing.
Maserati 250F, 1956 version.
BRM P25, 1956. To use the brush for the semi-metallic finish was quite a brave endeavour over- sixty years ago.

Chinese Contract Diecasting

By Maz Woolley

All text by, and copyright of the Author. All photographs provided by the Manufacturer.

Having given my MAR Online Editor business cards to several Chinese companies at the London Toy Fair earlier this year I have had emails from Chinese companies eager for me to buy their products or to use their services. These are usually dry business circulars but one recently sent to me is full of pictures and information. Given the veil of secrecy that covers the production of models in China I think a look at the story they tell will be of interest to many of us who wonder where, and how, our models are made in China.

The companies name is TongTong Renhe which was founded in 2003 as a precision model maker and which operates under the TT brand. They are based in Shenzen Dapeng New which is part of the attrractive coastal Longang District in Guandong. They offer all stages of model making from research and development, through 3D design and mould making, to final production, They seem to mainly focus upon cars, container lorries, and fire trucks but that is not all that they produce as shown later.


Based in a pretty typical medium size industrial unit.

The Factory

The pictures shown below were provided by the company and show carious aspects of the factory unit. The unit is clearly not in use when the photographs were taken and the operatives look like they have been included for effect, the person spraying is doing so with an empty spray gun for example!

The company goal which is about striving to reach the heights by working together
Rest and lecture areas as well as production facilities
Work benches for design area and boxes of finished models on view
Production line and work stations
Production machinery ready for work
More machinery
Another corner of the production area
Many machines are not automated
Spray booth being shown off

The products

Many of the products shown appear to be for the Chinese home market but others are clearly geared towards exports. Models are made to a variety of scales. First we will look at the 1:18 scale models

1:18 Scale Construction Vehicles
1:18 Scale Unnamed SUV
1:18 Scale Borgward Isabella
1:18 Scale Mazda MX5
1:18 Scale Mazda MX5 rear
1:18 Scale Sinotruck Tractor with Articulated Container carrier
1:18 Scale Sitrak Tractor with Articulated Container carrier
1:!8 scale La Ferrari

1:24 Scale

Sitrak (MAN and Sinotruck alliance) Fire Appliance
Ground to Air Missile System

1:43 Scale


1:43 Scale WTCC car surely produced for European brand.

1:48 Scale

Chinese Fighter aircraft. with a full cabinet of models behind

1:72 Scale

1:72 scale SInotruck tipper

Not to scale

How an earth do they not topple over? Fully laden display Container ship
A historic ship for display

The only product bearing a recognisable emblem is the Fighter Aircraft which has a box with the AF1 logo on it. Yet AF1 are a separate company also based in Donguan, perhaps they subcontract work to TT from time to time or there are other links.

Although many of the models are obviously aimed at the home market, and in particular the executive offices of those running trucks, ships and other vehicles, they are also clearly intent on selling models abroad with overseas partners.

It is interesting to see where our models are made and this type of contractor is the source of many of our models. The large number of new western brands of 1:18 scale metal models would not exist without such firms being able to develop and produce models to fit into a branded box sold by a Western firm..

A look around in November 2018

By Maz Woolley

All text by, and copyright of, the Author. Photographs provided by manufacturers and wholesalers.

There is a huge range of models being released in the final quarter of this year. This article looks at models from a wide range of manufacturers that we do not often review.

Bburago and Maisto

Both brands from the same maker. Well known for budget models and often selling in toy shops and stores which offer few other model vehicles. The models are often in larger scales but 1:43 models also feature.

B18-11040 1:18 Bugatti Chiron


Bburago Triumph Bobber 1:18


M31409 1:10 Honda Repsol 2017 Marc Marquez #93

Ready painted assembly kits 1:24 ferarri FXX-X


M39124 1:24 Build your own Lamborghini Aventador LP700-4

B18-31456 Mercedes Benz car transporter with 1 x 1:43 die cast car

B18-30393 1:43 Suburu WRX STI 2017 sold from trade pack

 

CMC

 

CMC models are famed for being both expensive and beautifully modelled. Here we see a group of Ferrari racing cars built to their usual very high standards. All the models date back to the classic 1950s racing scene.

CMC M183 Ferrari D50, 1956, GP Italy (Monza) #26 Collins/Fangio


CMC M184 Ferrari D50 yellow GP Belgium #20 Pilette and Lancia D50 #6 Ascari


CMC M185 Ferrari D50,1956 long nose, GP Germany #2 Collins

Ixo

Many of the Atlas Jaguar models have yet to be seen under the Ixo brand. Here we have the Mark Ten which appeared in the Atlas series with a rather ‘tip-toes’ appearance in maroon. Here we see it in a pale blue with slightly more detailed wheels. It still has Jaguar on the number plates rather than realistic ones.

 

IXO CLC291 Jaguar MK 10, metallic-light blue, 1961

Almost Real

They are makers of detailed 1:18 scale resin models, many sold in as promotionals by the manufacturers. This is a model of one of the last Defenders made.

ALM 810307 Land Rover Defender 110 Heritage Collection Green

Road Kings

Following the Scania recently looked at in MAR Online  there is now a new model. Again this is a classic tractor unit, this time from Mercedes-Benz. Again it looks a large and impressive diecast model.

Mercedes LPS 1632 1969 blue/red/black 1:18

Tecnomodel

These resin kits are very detailed resin models mostly to 1:18 scale and are made in Italy.

TEC 18111C Lotus Evora 410 met green 2017

These models are made in small batches. Batches are also to be made in yellow, silver and black


TEC 1897A Bizzarrini P538 Le Mans 1966 #10

Driven by Edgar Berney and Andre Wicky. The same mould has been used to produce two press versions in red and blue. There is also to be a blue Can-Am version.

CMR (Classic Model Replicars)

CMR make diecast models in China. They make a wide range of classic racing models. Most models are in 1:18 scale.

CMR 045 Porsche 917 LH #18 24h LeMans 1971 Rodriguez, Oliver


CMR 070 Ferrari 340 Berlinetta Mexico #20

3rd placed in the Carrera Panamericana  in 1952 driven by Chinetti and Lucas


CMR 111 Shelby Cobra Daytona coupe #12 24h LeMans 1965

Driven by Schlesser and Grant


CMR 112 Shelby Cobra Daytona #59 24h LeMans 1965

Driven by Harper and Sutcliffe


CMR 113 Aston Martin DBR1 #5 Winner 24h LeMans 1959

Driven by Shelby and Salvadori

CMR 12006 Ferrari 330 P4 #21 2nd 24h LeMans 1967 1:12 Scale

Driven by Scarfiotti, Parkes

BoS (Best of Show)

Best of Show is a brand produced for ModelCarGroup in Germany. The models are made in resin in China. Initially BoS models were made in 1:43 and 1:18 scale at a lower standard than the premium brands MCG own like Neo. After they stopped making 1:87 scale Neo models they introduced a slightly less detailed range of resin 1:87 scale models under the BoS brand. Here we see two of the Renault cars available which feature good wheels and detailing.

Renault 18, rot, 1978


Renault Fuego, metallic-dunkelbeige, 1980

CMF

Another MCG brand made in China from resin to 1:18 scale. These are detailed models and considerably dearer than their MCG diecast 1:18 scale range.   Following the fashion to model the immediately pre-war German streamliners that is popular with many ranges this year.

Maybach DS8 Stromlinien-Cabriolet Spohn, light grey and black  1934


Maybach SW35 Stromlinie Spohn, black and beige 1935


 

Budget Models from Maisto/Bburago

By Maz Woolley

Text by, and copyright of, the Author as well as photographs from the London Toy Fair. All other images supplied by the Manufacturer.

As the price of models made specifically for collectors spiral ever higher it is unlikely that they will draw many into the hobby. At the same time the future of subscription series and part works is very much in the air with the effective closure of Atlas by DeAgostini. which may limit another way collectors might start. So what is left to inspire new collectors in 1:43 and above? We have looked at Oxford Diecast and Greenlight recently who are obvious firms to turn to in the UK and US. Another option traded internationally is Maisto and Bburago whose models are made by the May Cheong Group in China.

These models are produced in a wide range of scales and the quality has been improving over the last few years. Although some classic vehicles are offered there is a strong emphasis on current and recent models that new collectors may want to own as well as lots of Grand Prix and other sporting vehicles. For new collectors for whom 1:18 scale OttO or GT Spirit are much too expensive there are models on offer for less than even the budget Solido 1:18 range.

At the London Toy Fair earlier this year their UK distributor had a substantial number of the models on show and they were surprisingly detailed and well finished for the price they were intended to sell at.

 

Some Maisto on Display

Bburago Display

The  remainder of this article looks at some of the cars and motorbikes that they have announced as available over the last two months. There is a regular flow of models from these firms although re-colours do form a good part of the output.

1:18 Scale Bburago

 

B18-11040BK 1:18 Bugatti Chiron 42

 

B18-11042Y 1:18 Lamborghini Urus

1:24 Scale Bburago

 

B18-21083 1:24 Fiat 124 Spider

1:24 Scale Maisto

 

 

M32509 1:24 Bugatti Chiron “Design Collection”

 

 

M31256 1:24 Dodge Charger R/T “Harley Davidson Custom range”

M32527 1:24 Datsun 510 1971 “Design Collection”

Bburago 1:43 Scale Models

 

B18-36031/BC 1:43 Laferrari Aperta

 

B18-36032/BC 1:43 Ferrari 812 Superfast

 

B18-31018 1:43 Mercedes Benz230 GE Papamobile

Bburago 1:50 Scale Construction

 

B18-32085 1:50 A25G Articulated Hauler

B18-32086 1:50 EC220E Excavator

Maisto 1:18 Scale Motorcycles

 

M34007-07024 Ducati 1098S

M34007-08011 Ducati 848
M34007-11092 Ducati 1199
M34007-17040 Ducati Supersport S
M34007-321 Yamaha YZF-R1

M34007-07081 Yamaha YZF-R6

M34007-04049 Yamaha YZ450F

M34007-311 Yamaha TT-R 250

M34007-07082 Honda CBR1000RR

M34007-10021 Honda CRF450R

M34007-336 Honda CR250R

M39300-335 Honda XR400R

 

M34007-03138 Kawasaki Z1000

M34007-04045 Kawasaki KX250F

M34007-06187 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-14R

M39300 Kawasaki KLX250SR

M34007-359 Suzuki GSX-R600

M34007-04047 Suzuki RM-Z250

M34007-05232 Suzuki GSX-R1000

M34007-349 Suzuki RM250

M34007-08010 BMW HP2 Sport

M34007-351 BMW F650 GS

M34007-06186 Triumph Daytona 675

M34007-342 Triumph Speed Triple

M34007-346 Triumph Thunderbird

M34007-16909 Husqvarna FC450

M34007-04043 KTM 525SX

M34007-09266 KTM 690 Duke

M34007-353 KTM 640 Duke

Bburago 1:18 Scale Motorcycle

 

B18-51039 Triumph Rocket


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Another Miniature Ford Prefect 100E?

By Mike Harvey

Article text copyright of the Author. Photographs by, and copyright of the Author except where otherwise credited.

Editor: This article is based upon Mike’s recent posting on our Facebook page which is so interesting that it is reproduced here so all our readers may share it. This follows up Dave Turner’s recent article on the 1953 Ford Prefect which can be found here

I have just rediscovered my Premier’s plastic kit of an English Ford. Despite the box front artwork the kit is a left hand drive 100E but with a Prefect grille. The box side artwork shows a left hand drive car but with a missing B pillar on the driver’s side. Moulded in light blue plastic it scales out at 1:25.

There are two tone chromed parts with wheel hub caps a slightly different colour to the surrounds, and the grille surround different from the slatted part. The chromed V emblem for the bonnet top helps date it. 

The instructions for putting the parts together are shown below.

I have not had the heart to put it together, and dry runs show that 60+ years after manufacture a considerable amount of fettling would be needed to produce a good result now.

Mike points out that although the grille and other fitting are clearly those of a Ford Prefect it has a two door body shell and the Prefect was a four door in the UK. Perhaps Ford sold two door cars with Prefect trimmings in other markets or maybe the car is a hybrid between a Prefect and Anglia.

This model  was joined by several other UK cars in the original series. In addition to the Triumph TR3 shown on the box side below there were also a Jaguar XK120 as well as a Nash Rambler a.k.a.  Austin Metropolitan.

Editor: Mike also pointed us to the Onethirtysecond web site where there is a page dedicated to the kit and the one piece resin body created from it. Onethirtysecond was run as a hobby company and seems to currently be on a back burner due to the owner’s other commitments so the resin reproduction may no longer be available.

onethirtysecond 100E Photo © onethirtysecond

onethirtysecond Ford 100E Photo © onethirtysecond

 

Matt Irvine, famous for his books on making plastic kits, confirmed to onethirtysecond  that Premier was a kit line made in the US making it a puzzling choice for a US maker.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

The Scooter in Miniature – Other Makes

By Dave Turner

Photographs and illustrations of some of the models discussed in this article taken by the Author may be found at the end of the article. 

Ducati

Ducati began producing radio parts in 1922 followed by cameras and electric razors. After the Second World War Ducati acquired Siata to produce clip-on motors for cycles and in 1952 launched the Cruiser scooter. Years before its time it featured a 175cc ohv four stroke motor with a 12 volt electric starter, automatic transmission and styling by Ghia. Far too sophisticated for the period it died after just two years but another attempt came with the totally basic Brio 48 in 1964 with a 94cc 2 stroke motor followed by the Brio 50 and 100/25 between 1968/9.

A very nice model of the Cruiser is available sold as Altaya but made by Ixo no doubt in conjunction with a part-work. Of mainly diecast construction it features plastic side panels and working steering.

Heinkel

Makers of German aircraft since 1922 Heinkel were limited to three and two wheeled vehicle production after the Second World War. Their 150cc Tourist 101 was made from 1953-54 and featured a four stroke engine. This model was replaced by the 175cc 102 in 1954 while a Mk11 version with more streamlined rear bodywork was made from 1962-67. A smaller two stroke machine, the 112 featured a 125cc engine in 1960 but was enlarged to 150 in 1961 for continued production until 1967.

Schuco produced some superb 1:10 scale diecast models of the Mk11 Tourist in a variety of versions as well as smaller versions in their Piccolo range.

Jawa

The Czech firm of Janacek made the German Wanderer motor cycle under licence and when they merged with the Czech Arms Works who had made motor cycles since 1932, the name Jawa was created. Their distinctive 501 scooter made from 1957-64 featured a pointed nose that accommodated the fuel tank and the headlamp. A subsequent model the 502 had more power with a 175 engine and the headlight was later moved onto the apron being replaced in the nose by the horn. In 2017 an electric powered scooter, the 507, featured the same styling and is to be built in limited numbers in China.

A smaller engined and less eye-catching scooter, the Manet appeared in 1958 and featured a 98cc motor and became the Tatran with 125 motor in 1965.

A flywheel powered plastic toy Cezeta captured the recognisable styling very well and carries the CH logo as its only means of identification.

MBK

The French Motobecane company made motor cycles from 1923, the post war Mobylette being among their most popular products. In 1984 the Japanese Yamaha company became its parent company and the name became MBK. Among the contemporary Japanese parent companies products was the Zuma scooter and MBK gave it the name Booster and the French factory have produced these in large numbers in 50 and 125cc versions.

Appropriately Majorette, possibly in conjunction with Hatchette, have produced a model of the French version of this machine, said to be a 1995 50cc example.

Malaguti

This Italian company began in 1930 producing pedal cycles but like many moved into mopeds and scooters in the post war period. A myriad of different scooters were produced but the Phantom F12 appeared in 1997. The F12 Phantom had a 50cc motor and was water cooled, production lasting until 2003.

Maisto produced a 1:18 scale diecast model of the F12 Phantom and it comes complete with “liquid cooled” stickers that are barely legible.

Mitsubishi

Mitsubishi began as a shipping company in 1870 and from 1881 developed into a huge conglomerate embracing first coal mining, then steel producing, shipbuilding, insurance and eventually producing anything and everything imaginable. From 1921 aircraft were produced and in common with some other Japanese operations they enforced slave labour during the Second World War. Motor scooter production began in 1946 with the 112cc C10 Silver Pigeon while at least seventeen further developments of the Silver Pigeon scooter were made up to the early 1960s, taking 45% of the Japanese scooter market.

The C110 Silver Pigeon was a 175cc 4 stroke machine with automatic transmission made between 1960/61 and some tinplate toys of which were made by both Marusan and Bandai.

Simson

The German Simson brothers got into the gun and gun barrel producing business in 1856 and by 1896 were making bicycles. Although firearms continued to be their principle products cars were made from 1907 to 1934 – with the inevitable wartime gap. As the Simson family were Jewish, the German Third Reich seized their factory in 1936 renaming the operation BSW. Following the Second World War the factory ended up in the German Democratic Republic and began producing 4 stroke motor cycles in 1949. In 1955 the Simson name was restored and the production of two stroke mopeds began developing into the KR51 Simson Schwalbe (Swallow) scooter in 1964. This featured a 50cc motor and large 16” wheels and with an increase in power output became the KR51/1 in 1968. The subsequent KR 51/2 remained in production until 1986 and the Schwalbe has become quite collectable in Germany.

A 1:10 diecast Simson KR 51/1 Schwalbe was produced by Schuco in 2006 while a much smaller 1:87 model of the same subject has been made by Herpa.

Suzuki

This Japanese company began by producing loom machines in 1909 but was trying to expand its product base by experimenting with a prototype light car prior to the Second World War. Following the hostilities production of 36cc powered cycles began in 1952, motor cycles in 1954 and cars a year later. In the early 1980s their first scooters appeared with the CS50, 80 and 125, called Gemma in Asia, Roadie in the UK and Puch Lido in Europe.

A 1:28 scale diecast Gemma 50 was made by Tomy, a slightly larger 1:24 scale diecast of the same subject from Tamiya and kits in 1:12 scale from Aoshima/Imai.

Yamaha

Yamaha began producing pianos and reed organs in 1887 and ultimately became the largest manufacturers of musical instruments in the world. They first produced motor cycles is 1954 with their 125cc two stroke Dragonfly, that was based on the German DKW RT 125, as was the BSA Bantam. Their first of many scooters came in 1981 with the 50cc Salient and 80cc Beluga, Riva in the US and Hercules in Europe. In 1985 a 125cc version was added. The Zuma scooter came in 1989 and this was also made in France by MBK. In an effort to modernise their range of scooters Yamaha produced the YJ 50 Vino in 2001 which continued until updated into the XC50 in 2006. Production of this continues today while the 125cc version lasted from 2004-10. The Yamaha Majesty was a large machine appearing in 2001 and was produced in 125, 250 and 400cc sizes.

In model form Yamaha scooters have been produced in various sizes and materials. Plastic kits for the Beluga came from Aoshima/Imai in 1:12 scale and Otaki in 1:16 scale, while a diecast 1:24 scale version came from Tomica. A diecast/plastic 1:18 scale Vino YJ50R came from Welly, a diecast 1:6 scale version of the same was done by New Ray while the big Majesty DX 400 also came in 1:18 scale from Welly.

Zundapp

This German company began by producing detonators in 1917 but as the demand for weapons parts declined after the war motor cycle manufacture began in 1921. Following the Second World War microcar, moped and scooter production was undertaken and inspired by the Parilia Greyhound, the Zundapp Bella scooter appeared in 1953. These became generally regarded as among the best scooters in the world at the time and through various updates continued in both 150 and 200 versions until 1964. An attempt to get into the small scooter market was launched in 1964 with the Roller 50 that was based on the contemporary Lambretta Slimline. The company closed in 1985 and the factory and stock were moved to China.

At least three very different miniature Bellas have been made. Tinplate toys came from Technofix while a variety of 1:10 scale diecast models of the 1957-59 R204 came from Schuco in 2004. The latter included solo examples, some with “Deutsche Bundespost” boxes mounted on the rear as well as machines with sidecars. There has also been some 1:43 scale models of the same R204 Bella from Premium Classix, in this case those with a rear box are marked “Ginos Pizza”

Unknown

As a final section there has been a few toys of scooters that so far have not been identified, in fact they are probably not meant to depict any particular example.

A quite imaginatively styled plastic battery driven toy called Chalmy Rider came from WS in Hong Kong and carries the number 6623 under its base. The seat tips revealing space that accommodates a couple of AA batteries, the fitting of which drives the twin rear wheels and illuminated an orange headlight.

An extremely slim plastic toy scooter that vaguely resembles something like the Triumph Tina carries no markings at all and probably came as an accessory to a Barbie type toy.

An all wood crafted toy has a suggestion of machine made parts that have been glued together but carries a barcode under its base.

Model list

Ducati Cruiser 175cc 1952-54 Altaya/Ixo 70mm 1:25 diecast/plastic
Heinkel Tourist 103A2 175cc 1960-65 Schuco 1:10 diecast kit
Heinkel Tourist 103A2 175cc 1960-65 Schuco Piccolo diecast
Jawa Cezeta 501 175cc 1957-64 CH 164mm plastic flywheel
MBK Booster Rocket 50cc 1984 Majorette 99mm 1:18 diecast/plastic
Malaguti Phantom F12 50cc 1997-03 Maisto 102mm 1:18 diecast/plastic
Mitsubishi C110 Silver Pigeon 175cc 1960-61 Marusan tinplate
Mitsubishi C110 Silver Pigeon 175cc 1960-61 Bandai tinplate
Simson KR 51/1 Schwalbe 50cc 1968-71 Schuco 1:10
Suzuki Gemma 50 50cc 1982-88 Aoshima/Imai 1:12 plastic kit
Suzuki Gemma 50 50cc 1982-88 Tamiya 80mm 1:24 diecast
Suzuki Gemma 50 50cc 1982-88 Tomy 58mm 1:28 diecast
Yamaha Beluga 80cc 1981-87 Aoshima/Imai 144 mm 1:12 plastic kit
Yamaha Beluga 80cc 1981-87 Otaki 1:16 plastic kit
Yamaha Beluga 80cc 1981-87 Tomica 80mm 1:24 diecast
Yamaha Vino VJ50R 50cc 2001-05 Welly 102mm 1:18 diecast/plastic
Yamaha Vino  VJ50R 50cc 2001-05 New Ray 1:6
Yamaha Majesty DX 400 400cc 2005-09 Welly 117mm 1:18 diecast/plastic
Zundapp Bella 200cc 1953-62 Technofix tin
Zundapp Bella R204 200cc 1957-59 Schuco 1:10 diecast kit
Zundapp Bella R204 200cc 1957-59 Premium Classix 1:43 resin

 

Ilustrations

Altaya/Ixo 1:25 diecast/plastic from China : 1952 Ducati Cruiser

Schuco 1:10 diecast kit : 06537, 1960 Heinkel 103 A2 Tourist.

Schuco Piccolo diecast : 05701, 1960 Heinkel 103 A2 Tourist.

CH plastic flywheel driven : 1957 Jawa Cezeta 501.

Majorette 1:18 diecast/plastic from Thailand: 1984 MBK Booster Rocket

Maisto 1:18 diecast/plastic from China : 1987 Malaguti Phantom F12.

Marusan tinplate from Japan : 1960 Mitsubishi Silver Pigeon C110.

 

Bandai tinplate from Japan: 1960 Mitsubishi Silver Pigeon C110.

Schuco 1:10 diecast kit : 06640, 1968 Simson KR 51/1 Schwalbe.

Aoshima 1:12 plastic kit from Japan: 1982 Suzuki Gemma 50

Tamiya 1:24 diecast from Japan: 1982 Suzuki Gemma 50

Tomy 1:28 diecast from Japan: 49, 1982 Suzuki Gemma 50.

 

 Aoshima 1:12 plastic kit from Japan: 1981 Yamaha Beluga.

Tomica 1:24 diecast from Japan: 1981 Yamaha Beluga.

Welly 1:18 diecast/plastic from China: 2001 Yamaha Vino YJ50R.

New Ray 1:6 from China: 2001 Yamaha Vino YJ50R.

Welly 1:18 diecast/plastic from China: 2005 Yamaha Majesty DX 400.

Technofix tin from Japan: 1953 Zundapp Bella.

Schuco 1:10 diecast kit: 06590, 1958 Zundapp Bella R204.

Schuco 1:10 diecast kit: 06593 1958 Zundapp Bella r204 with Deutsche Bundespost box.

Premium Classix 1:43 : 1957 Zundapp Bella R204.
Premium Classix 1:43: 1957 Zundapp Bella R204 with Ginos Pizza box.
WS plastic battery driven from Hong Kong: Chalmy Rider toy.

Anonymous slim plastic scooter.

Anonymous wood scooter.

 

Readers who have enjoyed this series of articles may find the two Auto Review publications written by Dave Turner about real Scooters of interest:

  • “Scooters”
  • “More Scooters” 

For more information go to zeteo.com.


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A new Tatra

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

 

A few weeks ago whilst searching eBay for items of interest I came across an entry for a Tatra 603 fixed on a wooden baseplate. With my interest in Tatra models I quickly made a bid and won the model.

The model is of a type 603 saloon from 1956 with the headlights modified from from 3 to 4 but they did not rework the surrounding mouldings. It is to a scale of 1:25.

I now have a new item in my Tatra model collection.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page,  or email us at maronlineeditor @ gmail.com.