Category Archives: 1:24

Another Miniature Ford Prefect 100E?

By Mike Harvey

Article text copyright of the Author. Photographs by, and copyright of the Author except where otherwise credited.

Editor: This article is based upon Mike’s recent posting on our Facebook page which is so interesting that it is reproduced here so all our readers may share it. This follows up Dave Turner’s recent article on the 1953 Ford Prefect which can be found here

I have just rediscovered my Premier’s plastic kit of an English Ford. Despite the box front artwork the kit is a left hand drive 100E but with a Prefect grille. The box side artwork shows a left hand drive car but with a missing B pillar on the driver’s side. Moulded in light blue plastic it scales out at 1:25.

There are two tone chromed parts with wheel hub caps a slightly different colour to the surrounds, and the grille surround different from the slatted part. The chromed V emblem for the bonnet top helps date it. 

The instructions for putting the parts together are shown below.

I have not had the heart to put it together, and dry runs show that 60+ years after manufacture a considerable amount of fettling would be needed to produce a good result now.

Mike points out that although the grille and other fitting are clearly those of a Ford Prefect it has a two door body shell and the Prefect was a four door in the UK. Perhaps Ford sold two door cars with Prefect trimmings in other markets or maybe the car is a hybrid between a Prefect and Anglia.

This model  was joined by several other UK cars in the original series. In addition to the Triumph TR3 shown on the box side below there were also a Jaguar XK120 as well as a Nash Rambler a.k.a.  Austin Metropolitan.

Editor: Mike also pointed us to the Onethirtysecond web site where there is a page dedicated to the kit and the one piece resin body created from it. Onethirtysecond was run as a hobby company and seems to currently be on a back burner due to the owner’s other commitments so the resin reproduction may no longer be available.

onethirtysecond 100E Photo © onethirtysecond

onethirtysecond Ford 100E Photo © onethirtysecond

 

Matt Irvine, famous for his books on making plastic kits, confirmed to onethirtysecond  that Premier was a kit line made in the US making it a puzzling choice for a US maker.


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The Scooter in Miniature – Other Makes

By Dave Turner

Photographs and illustrations of some of the models discussed in this article taken by the Author may be found at the end of the article. 

Ducati

Ducati began producing radio parts in 1922 followed by cameras and electric razors. After the Second World War Ducati acquired Siata to produce clip-on motors for cycles and in 1952 launched the Cruiser scooter. Years before its time it featured a 175cc ohv four stroke motor with a 12 volt electric starter, automatic transmission and styling by Ghia. Far too sophisticated for the period it died after just two years but another attempt came with the totally basic Brio 48 in 1964 with a 94cc 2 stroke motor followed by the Brio 50 and 100/25 between 1968/9.

A very nice model of the Cruiser is available sold as Altaya but made by Ixo no doubt in conjunction with a part-work. Of mainly diecast construction it features plastic side panels and working steering.

Heinkel

Makers of German aircraft since 1922 Heinkel were limited to three and two wheeled vehicle production after the Second World War. Their 150cc Tourist 101 was made from 1953-54 and featured a four stroke engine. This model was replaced by the 175cc 102 in 1954 while a Mk11 version with more streamlined rear bodywork was made from 1962-67. A smaller two stroke machine, the 112 featured a 125cc engine in 1960 but was enlarged to 150 in 1961 for continued production until 1967.

Schuco produced some superb 1:10 scale diecast models of the Mk11 Tourist in a variety of versions as well as smaller versions in their Piccolo range.

Jawa

The Czech firm of Janacek made the German Wanderer motor cycle under licence and when they merged with the Czech Arms Works who had made motor cycles since 1932, the name Jawa was created. Their distinctive 501 scooter made from 1957-64 featured a pointed nose that accommodated the fuel tank and the headlamp. A subsequent model the 502 had more power with a 175 engine and the headlight was later moved onto the apron being replaced in the nose by the horn. In 2017 an electric powered scooter, the 507, featured the same styling and is to be built in limited numbers in China.

A smaller engined and less eye-catching scooter, the Manet appeared in 1958 and featured a 98cc motor and became the Tatran with 125 motor in 1965.

A flywheel powered plastic toy Cezeta captured the recognisable styling very well and carries the CH logo as its only means of identification.

MBK

The French Motobecane company made motor cycles from 1923, the post war Mobylette being among their most popular products. In 1984 the Japanese Yamaha company became its parent company and the name became MBK. Among the contemporary Japanese parent companies products was the Zuma scooter and MBK gave it the name Booster and the French factory have produced these in large numbers in 50 and 125cc versions.

Appropriately Majorette, possibly in conjunction with Hatchette, have produced a model of the French version of this machine, said to be a 1995 50cc example.

Malaguti

This Italian company began in 1930 producing pedal cycles but like many moved into mopeds and scooters in the post war period. A myriad of different scooters were produced but the Phantom F12 appeared in 1997. The F12 Phantom had a 50cc motor and was water cooled, production lasting until 2003.

Maisto produced a 1:18 scale diecast model of the F12 Phantom and it comes complete with “liquid cooled” stickers that are barely legible.

Mitsubishi

Mitsubishi began as a shipping company in 1870 and from 1881 developed into a huge conglomerate embracing first coal mining, then steel producing, shipbuilding, insurance and eventually producing anything and everything imaginable. From 1921 aircraft were produced and in common with some other Japanese operations they enforced slave labour during the Second World War. Motor scooter production began in 1946 with the 112cc C10 Silver Pigeon while at least seventeen further developments of the Silver Pigeon scooter were made up to the early 1960s, taking 45% of the Japanese scooter market.

The C110 Silver Pigeon was a 175cc 4 stroke machine with automatic transmission made between 1960/61 and some tinplate toys of which were made by both Marusan and Bandai.

Simson

The German Simson brothers got into the gun and gun barrel producing business in 1856 and by 1896 were making bicycles. Although firearms continued to be their principle products cars were made from 1907 to 1934 – with the inevitable wartime gap. As the Simson family were Jewish, the German Third Reich seized their factory in 1936 renaming the operation BSW. Following the Second World War the factory ended up in the German Democratic Republic and began producing 4 stroke motor cycles in 1949. In 1955 the Simson name was restored and the production of two stroke mopeds began developing into the KR51 Simson Schwalbe (Swallow) scooter in 1964. This featured a 50cc motor and large 16” wheels and with an increase in power output became the KR51/1 in 1968. The subsequent KR 51/2 remained in production until 1986 and the Schwalbe has become quite collectable in Germany.

A 1:10 diecast Simson KR 51/1 Schwalbe was produced by Schuco in 2006 while a much smaller 1:87 model of the same subject has been made by Herpa.

Suzuki

This Japanese company began by producing loom machines in 1909 but was trying to expand its product base by experimenting with a prototype light car prior to the Second World War. Following the hostilities production of 36cc powered cycles began in 1952, motor cycles in 1954 and cars a year later. In the early 1980s their first scooters appeared with the CS50, 80 and 125, called Gemma in Asia, Roadie in the UK and Puch Lido in Europe.

A 1:28 scale diecast Gemma 50 was made by Tomy, a slightly larger 1:24 scale diecast of the same subject from Tamiya and kits in 1:12 scale from Aoshima/Imai.

Yamaha

Yamaha began producing pianos and reed organs in 1887 and ultimately became the largest manufacturers of musical instruments in the world. They first produced motor cycles is 1954 with their 125cc two stroke Dragonfly, that was based on the German DKW RT 125, as was the BSA Bantam. Their first of many scooters came in 1981 with the 50cc Salient and 80cc Beluga, Riva in the US and Hercules in Europe. In 1985 a 125cc version was added. The Zuma scooter came in 1989 and this was also made in France by MBK. In an effort to modernise their range of scooters Yamaha produced the YJ 50 Vino in 2001 which continued until updated into the XC50 in 2006. Production of this continues today while the 125cc version lasted from 2004-10. The Yamaha Majesty was a large machine appearing in 2001 and was produced in 125, 250 and 400cc sizes.

In model form Yamaha scooters have been produced in various sizes and materials. Plastic kits for the Beluga came from Aoshima/Imai in 1:12 scale and Otaki in 1:16 scale, while a diecast 1:24 scale version came from Tomica. A diecast/plastic 1:18 scale Vino YJ50R came from Welly, a diecast 1:6 scale version of the same was done by New Ray while the big Majesty DX 400 also came in 1:18 scale from Welly.

Zundapp

This German company began by producing detonators in 1917 but as the demand for weapons parts declined after the war motor cycle manufacture began in 1921. Following the Second World War microcar, moped and scooter production was undertaken and inspired by the Parilia Greyhound, the Zundapp Bella scooter appeared in 1953. These became generally regarded as among the best scooters in the world at the time and through various updates continued in both 150 and 200 versions until 1964. An attempt to get into the small scooter market was launched in 1964 with the Roller 50 that was based on the contemporary Lambretta Slimline. The company closed in 1985 and the factory and stock were moved to China.

At least three very different miniature Bellas have been made. Tinplate toys came from Technofix while a variety of 1:10 scale diecast models of the 1957-59 R204 came from Schuco in 2004. The latter included solo examples, some with “Deutsche Bundespost” boxes mounted on the rear as well as machines with sidecars. There has also been some 1:43 scale models of the same R204 Bella from Premium Classix, in this case those with a rear box are marked “Ginos Pizza”

Unknown

As a final section there has been a few toys of scooters that so far have not been identified, in fact they are probably not meant to depict any particular example.

A quite imaginatively styled plastic battery driven toy called Chalmy Rider came from WS in Hong Kong and carries the number 6623 under its base. The seat tips revealing space that accommodates a couple of AA batteries, the fitting of which drives the twin rear wheels and illuminated an orange headlight.

An extremely slim plastic toy scooter that vaguely resembles something like the Triumph Tina carries no markings at all and probably came as an accessory to a Barbie type toy.

An all wood crafted toy has a suggestion of machine made parts that have been glued together but carries a barcode under its base.

Model list

Ducati Cruiser 175cc 1952-54 Altaya/Ixo 70mm 1:25 diecast/plastic
Heinkel Tourist 103A2 175cc 1960-65 Schuco 1:10 diecast kit
Heinkel Tourist 103A2 175cc 1960-65 Schuco Piccolo diecast
Jawa Cezeta 501 175cc 1957-64 CH 164mm plastic flywheel
MBK Booster Rocket 50cc 1984 Majorette 99mm 1:18 diecast/plastic
Malaguti Phantom F12 50cc 1997-03 Maisto 102mm 1:18 diecast/plastic
Mitsubishi C110 Silver Pigeon 175cc 1960-61 Marusan tinplate
Mitsubishi C110 Silver Pigeon 175cc 1960-61 Bandai tinplate
Simson KR 51/1 Schwalbe 50cc 1968-71 Schuco 1:10
Suzuki Gemma 50 50cc 1982-88 Aoshima/Imai 1:12 plastic kit
Suzuki Gemma 50 50cc 1982-88 Tamiya 80mm 1:24 diecast
Suzuki Gemma 50 50cc 1982-88 Tomy 58mm 1:28 diecast
Yamaha Beluga 80cc 1981-87 Aoshima/Imai 144 mm 1:12 plastic kit
Yamaha Beluga 80cc 1981-87 Otaki 1:16 plastic kit
Yamaha Beluga 80cc 1981-87 Tomica 80mm 1:24 diecast
Yamaha Vino VJ50R 50cc 2001-05 Welly 102mm 1:18 diecast/plastic
Yamaha Vino  VJ50R 50cc 2001-05 New Ray 1:6
Yamaha Majesty DX 400 400cc 2005-09 Welly 117mm 1:18 diecast/plastic
Zundapp Bella 200cc 1953-62 Technofix tin
Zundapp Bella R204 200cc 1957-59 Schuco 1:10 diecast kit
Zundapp Bella R204 200cc 1957-59 Premium Classix 1:43 resin

 

Ilustrations

Altaya/Ixo 1:25 diecast/plastic from China : 1952 Ducati Cruiser

Schuco 1:10 diecast kit : 06537, 1960 Heinkel 103 A2 Tourist.

Schuco Piccolo diecast : 05701, 1960 Heinkel 103 A2 Tourist.

CH plastic flywheel driven : 1957 Jawa Cezeta 501.

Majorette 1:18 diecast/plastic from Thailand: 1984 MBK Booster Rocket

Maisto 1:18 diecast/plastic from China : 1987 Malaguti Phantom F12.

Marusan tinplate from Japan : 1960 Mitsubishi Silver Pigeon C110.

 

Bandai tinplate from Japan: 1960 Mitsubishi Silver Pigeon C110.

Schuco 1:10 diecast kit : 06640, 1968 Simson KR 51/1 Schwalbe.

Aoshima 1:12 plastic kit from Japan: 1982 Suzuki Gemma 50

Tamiya 1:24 diecast from Japan: 1982 Suzuki Gemma 50

Tomy 1:28 diecast from Japan: 49, 1982 Suzuki Gemma 50.

 

 Aoshima 1:12 plastic kit from Japan: 1981 Yamaha Beluga.

Tomica 1:24 diecast from Japan: 1981 Yamaha Beluga.

Welly 1:18 diecast/plastic from China: 2001 Yamaha Vino YJ50R.

New Ray 1:6 from China: 2001 Yamaha Vino YJ50R.

Welly 1:18 diecast/plastic from China: 2005 Yamaha Majesty DX 400.

Technofix tin from Japan: 1953 Zundapp Bella.

Schuco 1:10 diecast kit: 06590, 1958 Zundapp Bella R204.

Schuco 1:10 diecast kit: 06593 1958 Zundapp Bella r204 with Deutsche Bundespost box.

Premium Classix 1:43 : 1957 Zundapp Bella R204.
Premium Classix 1:43: 1957 Zundapp Bella R204 with Ginos Pizza box.
WS plastic battery driven from Hong Kong: Chalmy Rider toy.

Anonymous slim plastic scooter.

Anonymous wood scooter.

 

Readers who have enjoyed this series of articles may find the two Auto Review publications written by Dave Turner about real Scooters of interest:

  • “Scooters”
  • “More Scooters” 

For more information go to zeteo.com.


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A new Tatra

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

 

A few weeks ago whilst searching eBay for items of interest I came across an entry for a Tatra 603 fixed on a wooden baseplate. With my interest in Tatra models I quickly made a bid and won the model.

The model is of a type 603 saloon from 1956 with the headlights modified from from 3 to 4 but they did not rework the surrounding mouldings. It is to a scale of 1:25.

I now have a new item in my Tatra model collection.


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News from the Continent January 2017 – Maisto

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

 

Maisto 531514 Bugatti Chiron

In 2016 Bugatti s.a.s. presented the successor of their Veyron, the Chiron. The car was again named after a famous Bugatti racing driver. It produces 1500 HP and with no speed limiter fitted it can reach speeds of over 400 KPH (c.250 MPH). However, this performance is expensive as each car will cost 2.4 Million Euros to buy, a million more than a Veyron!

Maisto have produced the model to 1:24 scale. It captures the car’s shape very well and it is painted in two tone blue.

The interior looks accurate and includes a lot of detail. The doors can be opened as shown above.

As the photograph above shows the upper part of the engine is visible through the rear windows.


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Greenlight Indy Racers and Roadsters

by Karl Schnelle

 

Back in June, I wrote about looking for diecast cars at the Indianapolis 500 open wheeled race.  The race was on May 29, 2016, and was the 100TH RUNNING!  I found some modern Indy style race cars there,  in 1/64 and 1/18 which are popular scales in the US.  That was about all I saw, and I did not buy any.  Then, my Mother, being the ultimate model car collector,  gave me a 1/24 scale Indy Roadster for my birthday.  I did not see this car anywhere for sale at the track in May.    She found it in a magazine ad!

The gold race car is in the style of the late 1930’s and 40’s with a long hood for the engine.   Embossed printing on the hood says 100th Running Indianapolis 500″ in red; on the rails underneath it says “INDIANAPOLIS MOTOR SPEEDWAY”.  The packaging was definitely for the 2016 race, and the car was made by Enlighten in China,  a large well-known, local company that makes all sorts of model cars.

Because of the retro style of the Roadster, with was unlike any Greenlight I had ever seen, I searched around online and found out that they had also made a similar one ten years before!  For the 90TH RUNNING of the Indy 500, Greenlight made a silver one and called it an Indy Racer on the box.   Not sure why they changed names.  So I was on the search for its twin and found it that same day ending at an online auction site.  The owner turned out to be from Indianapolis and had bought it at the race in May 2006 at one of the track gift shops.  What a small world!  So I had to have it and won it easily.

The box was more generic with no mention of the 90th running or the 2016 race itself.  The copyright on the bottom was 2006 so that was a give-away.   However, the same printing is on the car except that 90th was in place of 100th, still in red. The seat is the same red color, as the newer 100th version!

Here are both out of the box:

Once they were out of the box, other differences became apparent, not just the color and the printing.   The silver one is marked stainless on the box and is much heavier than the newer gold model. The bases are different as well, even they they are the exact same dimensions.

The silver is one-piece with a seam inside running down the middle.   It’s nice to see the date of the 2006 race engraved on the bottom. From my untrained eyes, it looks to be cast, polished stainless steel.  The lighter-weight gold one has a separate baseplate attached with six recessed screws.  Is this diecast made from the typical zinc alloy, like zamak (mazac)?

I assume the cost of a new mold for the gold one was feasible versus the cost of stainless steel, or the 2006 mold was lost?

In any case, 2006 is NOT the beginning of the story.  The box for the silver one talks about the original 1946 version that Tony Hulman (the owner of the track) and Wilbur Shaw (driver and President of the track) gave to drivers and sponsors.

The steel car was typical of the race cars of the late 30’s and into the 40’s.  In fact, ni500cc.com shows many older versions:

  1. Original which looks like the silver Greenlight with a small hole in the baseplate near the front and no writing on the hood (cowl), but the same writing on the rails
  2.  Same but with Wilbur Shaw’s signature embossed on the cowl
  3.  With Clabber Girl Spl embossed on the cowl
  4.  With Clabber Girl Spl sticker on the cowl
  5.  Red with and with out Shaw’s signature
  6.  Yellow with and with out Shaw’s signature
  7.  White with and with out Shaw’s signature
  8.  1947 Nash Pace Car or the 1948 Chevrolet Pace Car with company details embossed on to of the hood
  9.  A plastic version was reported to be made

I have the two new reproductions now, so perhaps I need to start prowling around the antique markets in Indy and online places to dig up nine more! The hunt is on!


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Atlas Motorcycles Series – Bultaco Sherpa

The Atlas Motorcycles series sold in the UK has plastic and metal models to 1:24 scale made in China by Ixo. It is no co-incidence that many of the models appeared first in the Ixo Museum series. The models are generally to a high standard for part works.

Bultaco was a Spanish manufacturer of two-stroke motorcycles from 1958 to 1983 founded by Francesc “Paco” Bultó who had been a director of the Montesa motorcycle company but left to form Bultaco.  Although they made road and road racing motorcycles, the company’s area of dominance was off-road, in motocross, enduros, and observed trials competition.

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

Perhaps the most famous Bultaco model is the Sherpa T, a trials bike, which revolutionised the sport in the 1960s. At that time trials was almost exclusively a British sport using big heavy four-stroke machines. Irish trials ace Sammy Miller teamed with Bultó to produce a lightweight two-stroke machine which, overnight, rendered the heavy four-strokes obsolete. Miller won the gruelling Scottish Six Days Trial in 1965, and then repeated the feat with wins in 1967 and 1968. He also claimed the European Trials Championship in 1968 and 1970. This coincided with and, perhaps, stimulated the growth in the popularity of trials in Europe and later the USA, which provided a lucrative market for Bultaco in the years to come. Bultaco dominated the World Trials Championship in the 1970s, winning the title eight times, and winning the Scottish Six Days Trial four times.

Exif_JPEG_PICTURE

The Sherpa T as modelled by Ixo for Atlas replaced the Sherpa N in 1965 it had an enlarged 244cc engine. The model is generally good with lots of details such as the protective cover under the engine. However the Cylinder head has a large gap between it and the Cylinder which is a shame because otherwise this is a very good model though it does suffer from the usual, for this series, headlight pointing upwards at a most unrealistic angle.


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Resin Roundup – ABC and Le Mans Models

By Maz Woolley with information from Hans-Georg Schmitt

Those who like to show their models of racing cars with transporters and other accessories may be interested in models announced by ABC and Le Mans Miniatures.

ABC

These are resin models made in Italy to 1:43 scale.

ABC043 - AUTOCARRO CEIRANO 47 CRA SCUDERIA FERRARI 1929ABC043 – AUTOCARRO CEIRANO 47 CRA SCUDERIA FERRARI 1929
ABC048 - LANCIA EPTAIOTA TORPEDONE SCUDERIA FERRARI 1930ABC048 – LANCIA EPTAIOTA TORPEDONE SCUDERIA FERRARI 1930

Le Mans Miniatures

Le Mans miniatures make a range of accessories and vehicles in several scales. Here are some recently announced models.

Jochen Rindt

Jochen Rindt 1:18 scale

Le Mans Miniatures have chosen to model Jochen Rindt based upon  Rainer W. Schlegermich’s famous picture. Sat in a camping chair, a cigarette in hand and with a bottle at this feet. In the photograph he is talking to Colin Chapman.


LMM Borranni Wire Wheels copy
Borani spoked wheels

These wheels are to 1:32 scale and are as used on LMM slotcars.


Noblebuilt Drums

Oil Drums

These are to 1:43 scale and would be ideal for pit lanes in the classic era.


LMM 57G Bugatti

Bugatti 57G

This model is to 1:24 scale and wheels and driver figure are also available as separate items. This car won Le Mans in 1937. This model is sold as a Kit.


LMM Ferrari T61

Ferrari 250 T61

This is a slot car but is detailed enough for display. It is the winner of Le Mans in 1961 driven by Olivier Gendebien and Phil Hill.


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Ford in Miniature – 1933

By Dave Turner

In February 1933 Ford unveiled a significant new car in the shape of the model 40. Compared to the preceding Model 18 this new Ford was significantly ‘streamlined’ with its sharply raked grille and windscreen, the frame was new with a longer 112” wheelbase while the graceful body was no less than 17” longer than the 1932 cars. The overall styling of these attractive cars was inspired by Fords own little 8hp Model Y introduced in the UK in 1932 and these new North American Fords went on to put the company back into the black.

Fords relatively new V8 engine was gradually being refined, while a four cylinder choice was still available. In the event the V8s outsold the fours by 40 to 1. A vast choice of bodies included sedans in two door (Tudor) or four door (Fordor), three and five window Coupes, open Phaetons, Roadsters and Cabriolets, the Victoria and the Station Wagon, most available in either standard or De Luxe finish. The latter could boast pinstriping, cowl lights, plus twin rather than single horns and tail lights. Then there were the car based Sedan Delivery, vans that featured the front end of the passenger vehicles. Total production of 1933 Fords was 312,510 and these were followed by the very similar ’34 that were immediately recognisable from their sharper ‘V’ grille with wider bright surround. Models of 1934 Fords were covered in MAR 274.

For some reason 1933 has not been a favourite subject year for the production of model Fords, especially when compared to the many from 1934. To begin with, that usually reliable source AMT has actually done a kit for the ’33, but it produced only varieties of hot rods so does not figure in this review. In a few cases it is debatable whether some models are ’33 or ’34 as some of their features are a tad indistinct. That comment certainly doesn’t apply to the superb Franklin Mint De Luxe Tudor however as it comes from that golden period when top quality models were still affordable. All the De Luxe details are present while the car depicted is a late ’33 example as it features the fender valences introduced mid year. Apparently Franklin called this model ‘John Dillingers’  car and while all manner of ‘props’ come with it the car is totally correct as stock.

 

1933 Ford illustration 1 Franklin Mint

Franklin Mint 1:24 diecast from China: YF78,  Tudor De Luxe

Sold as ‘John Dillingers Car’ but beautifully stock.


1933 Ford illustration 2 Franklin Mint from rear

 

Only two more 1933 models have been recorded, and they both came from a Centenary set of model Fords issued in Australia in 2003. They were part of a 100 Years of Ford set issued by  Classic Carlectibles at the time. The real De Luxe Sport Coupe was exclusive to Australia, the example modelled is the rare early 1933 car as mid year a Five Window body was adopted. The second Classic Carlectibles model is stretching a point to be a 1933, as production of the real Ute didn’t begin in Australia until January 1934, however, the model has utilised all the same parts as the Coupe, the base is marked ‘1934’ but the grille is pure ’33. Having said that the quality of these two 1:43 Fords is quite astounding.
Franklin Mint 1:24 diecast from China: YF78 Tudor De Luxe rear view

The prominent door hinges are not noticeable in the ‘metal’.


1933 Ford illustration 3 Classic Carlectibles

Classic Carlectibles 1:43 diecast from China: De Luxe Sport Coupe

In reality unique to Australia.


1933 Ford illustration 3 Classic Carlectibles rear

Classic Carlectibles 1:43 diecast from China: De Luxe Sport Coupe

Real car replaced mid 1933 by Five Window Coupe.


1933 Ford illustration 5

Classic Carlectibles 1:43 diecast from China: Ute

This model utilised the 1933 parts – grille etc.- from the Coupe, real Ute was a 1934 vehicle.


1933 Ford illustration 6 from the rear

Classic Carlectibles 1:43 diecast from China: Ute

The model comes with cover for pick up box.


 

Maker Origin Year Made Ref Body Length Scale Material
Franklin Mint China 2001 YF78 Tudor De Luxe 183mm 1:24 Diecast
Classic Carlectibles China 2003 Coupe De Luxe 104mm 1:43 Diecast
Classic Carlectibles China 2003 Ute 104mm 1:43 Diecast

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VW and Jag Chops

By Tony Galvin                                                         June 2015

Volkswagen Articulated Camper Van

I came across the picture of the real version having ‘Googled’ Images of VW Campervans. My first thoughts were what engine is in it? The old flat four would never move it. Second thoughts ‘Is it in India and if not where’? Third thought was I’ve got to make one.

As is obvious 2 Camper vans were required so 2 Lledo vans were obtained. I then purchased a couple of OO gauge railway carriages on ebay, but after a lot of effort it did not look right. As a result the sides, roof and chassis are made from sheet aluminium, which took a lot of work cutting out the windows and then fitting windows from the railway carriages with the curtains. I feel it was well worth the effort and I am quite proud of it, as it is probably the only one on the planet

The name Murvin Enterprises is fictitious, being half my surname and half my wife’s maiden name. It appears on many of my models.

Jaguar XK140 ‘Breadvan’

When attending the Goodwood Festival about 5 years ago I saw the Ferrari ‘Breadvan’ as it is so called, I don’t believe that it ever delivered any bread! I thought that Jaguar should also have one so I set about the task.

I already had a 1:24 scale XK140 so I chopped it up along with a van, the model of which I cannot remember. This uses an aluminium chassis again and aluminium was also used to form the rear wheel spats. A set of wheels off another model of a US vehicle and it was complete.

It may be of interest to other ‘choppers’ that when painting, a box with a 100 watt bulb in can reach 70 degrees. I put the casting and the paint in there before spraying and then the model when done. This stops ‘blooming’ particularly in cold weather. The compressor that I use was part of an old fridge and it feeds my airbrush at around 35psi via a 3 gallon stainless steel tank.


Ford in Miniature – 1935 Truck

‘Americas Great Truck Value Line’

By Dave Turner

1935 was a great year for Ford in many respects, they sold more cars and more trucks than any other US maker, the years of depression were receding, and Ford had new models in all sectors.

Ford’s 1935 truck line appeared more modern, the old Model A/B styling gave way to smoother outlines with no windscreen visor, and a grille that resembled that of the new 1935 cars whilst echoing the 1933 to 1934 cars pattern. A 221 cubic inches V8 motor was standard across the board. The ½ ton pick up came on a 112” wheelbase while a step up came with the 131½” chassis with a 7½” optional extension. For the larger trucks a 157” chassis was produced while an optional 11” extension for that was available for use in buses and other specialised vehicles.

A reasonable number of miniature 1935 trucks have been recorded but many are likely to take some finding and the identity and details of some are confused eighty or so years later. For example, the popularity of rubber toys in the 1930s and 1940s resulted in several makers in the US joining in. Two of these, the Auburn Rubber Co. and the Barr Rubber company, are both recorded as having produced 1935 trucks although most illustrations seem to be captioned as Barr products. The latter are also known to have produced some 1935 panel vans.

Some very attractive vehicular themed liquor decanters have been produced by the Jim BeamCompany and they include both pickups and tow trucks based on the 1935 Ford. Access to the liquid contents is gained by removing the top of the cab which allows the stopper located in the passenger seat to be removed. Another unlikely entry in the 1935 truck list is a child’s pedal car based on a 1935 pick up in a range called Beginnerkar.

For a quality diecast we have to go to Danbury Mint who produced some pick ups in a variety of liveries from 1995 while the DeHames Model Company, having begun in the 1970s and still operating, produced some models for the Ford Milestone Collection. One of these was based on some promotional ’35 Ford 131 ½” tractor units, coupled to Wood tanker bodied trailers and liveried “Ford Benzol” for delivering in the Detroit area.

Another 1930s US toymaker was Erie and they are recorded as having produced diecast pickups, ice trucks and tow trucks based on the ’35 Ford while another contemporaryTootsietoy produced a tow truck but it was simply a hook cast onto the modified rear section of their 1935 Coupe. More recent offerings came from Racing Champions with a 1:56 scale diecast pickup together with a tow truck. The latter was the pickup, minus the opening tailgate and the addition of a combined lifting boom and light bar. The detachable hood was made in one piece with a flat head V8 located beneath it.

Spec Cast distributed Liberty Classics diecast promotion models, or premiums, one of which was a bank/money box in the shape of a 1:25 scale 1935 pickup. Six barrels of fuel sit in the load box, the tops of which slide to the side to reveal the coin slot, while a lockable, hinged trap door in the base allows the retrieval of funds. A smaller inexpensive diecast pickup came from Road Champs around 1999 and this featured a drop down tailgate and opening cab doors, although only the lower section of the latter open. Road Champs was one of the many sub-series produced in China by Yatming.

‘Americas Great Truck Value Line’ 1935 Ford Truck
BY DAVE TURNER

 

1935 was a great year for Ford in many respects, they sold more cars and more trucks than any other US maker, the years of depression were receding, and Ford had new models in all sectors.

Ford’s 1935 truck line appeared more modern, the old Model A/B styling gave way to smoother outlines with no windscreen visor, and a grille that resembled that of the new 1935 cars whilst echoing the 1933 to 1934 cars pattern. A 221 cubic inches V8 motor was standard across the board. The ½ ton pick up came on a 112” wheelbase while a step up came with the 131½” chassis with a 7½” optional extension. For the larger trucks a 157” chassis was produced while an optional 11” extension for that was available for use in buses and other specialised vehicles.

A reasonable number of miniature 1935 trucks have been recorded but many are likely to take some finding and the identity and details of some are confused eighty or so years later. For example, the popularity of rubber toys in the 1930s and 1940s resulted in several makers in the US joining in. Two of these, the Auburn Rubber Co. and the Barr Rubber company, are both recorded as having produced 1935 trucks although most illustrations seem to be captioned as Barr products. The latter are also known to have produced some 1935 panel vans.

Some very attractive vehicular themed liquor decanters have been produced by the Jim BeamCompany and they include both pickups and tow trucks based on the 1935 Ford. Access to the liquid contents is gained by removing the top of the cab which allows the stopper located in the passenger seat to be removed. Another unlikely entry in the 1935 truck list is a child’s pedal car based on a 1935 pick up in a range called Beginnerkar.

For a quality diecast we have to go to Danbury Mint who produced some pick ups in a variety of liveries from 1995 while the DeHames Model Company, having begun in the 1970s and still operating, produced some models for the Ford Milestone Collection. One of these was based on some promotional ’35 Ford 131 ½” tractor units, coupled to Wood tanker bodied trailers and liveried “Ford Benzol” for delivering in the Detroit area.

Another 1930s US toymaker was Erie and they are recorded as having produced diecast pickups, ice trucks and tow trucks based on the ’35 Ford while another contemporaryTootsietoy produced a tow truck but it was simply a hook cast onto the modified rear section of their 1935 Coupe. More recent offerings came from Racing Champions with a 1:56 scale diecast pickup together with a tow truck. The latter was the pickup, minus the opening tailgate and the addition of a combined lifting boom and light bar. The detachable hood was made in one piece with a flat head V8 located beneath it.

Spec Cast distributed Liberty Classics diecast promotion models, or premiums, one of which was a bank/money box in the shape of a 1:25 scale 1935 pickup. Six barrels of fuel sit in the load box, the tops of which slide to the side to reveal the coin slot, while a lockable, hinged trap door in the base allows the retrieval of funds. A smaller inexpensive diecast pickup came from Road Champs around 1999 and this featured a drop down tailgate and opening cab doors, although only the lower section of the latter open. Road Champs was one of the many sub-series produced in China by Yatming.

Illustrations: 1935 Ford Trucks

1,2 &3. Road Champs 1:43 diecast from China: 48247 Pick up ‘Lionel Trains’

1_1935_Ford_Truck_Road_Champs.jpg

2_1935_Ford_Truck_Road_Champs_.jpg

3_1935_Ford_Truck_Road_Champs.jpg

4 & 5 Racing Champions 1:56 diecast from China: Pick up, rather untidy lift off hood.

4_1935_Ford_Truck_Racing_Champions.jpg

5_1935_Ford_Truck_Racing_Champions.jpg

6 & 7 Racing Champions 1:56 diecast from China: Tow truck variation on the pick up.

6_1935_Ford_Truck_Racing_Champions.jpg

7_1935_Ford_Truck_Racing_Champions.jpg

8 & 9 DeHanes 1:52 resin from USA: ‘Ford Milestone Collection’ 131 ½” tractor unit with Wood tanker trailer, ‘Ford Benzol’

8_1935_Ford_Truck_De_Hanes.jpg

9_1935_Ford_Truck_De_Hanes.jpg

10 & 11 Liberty Classics 1:25 diecast from China: Pick up ‘American Airlines’.

10_1935_Ford_Truck_Liberty_Classics.jpg

11_1935_Ford_Truck_Liberty_Classics.jpg

12. Barr Rubber Co. rubber from the USA: open truck and panel van

12_Ford_1935_1935_Ford_Army_truck_Barr_Rubber.jpg

13 Jim Beam decanter from USA: Pick up

13_Ford_1935_Jim_Beam_Decanter_Truck_Ford_Pickup_Box.jpg

14 Jim Beam decanter from USA: Tow truck

14_Ford_1935_Police_Tow_Truck_Jim_Bean_Decanter_.jpg

15 Danbury Mint 1:24 diecast from China: 505 Pick up

15_Ford_1935_Danbury_Mint_1935_Ford_Pickup_Truck_Diecast.jpg

1935 Truck Listing

Auburn USA 1930s Open Truck 4.75″ Rubber
Barr USA 1930s Open Truck 4.75″ Rubber
Barr USA 1930s Panel Van 4.25″ Rubber
Jim Beam USA 1980s Pickup Glass
Jim Beam USA 1980s Tow Truck Glass
Beginnerkar USA Pickup Pedal Car
Danbury Mint China 505 1995 Pickup 1:24 Diecast
DeHanes USA 131.5″ Tractor and Tanker 168mm 1:52 Resin
Erie USA 1930s Pickup 5″ Diecast

 


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