Category Archives: Parker Models

Parker Models Standard Vanguard Phase II Saloon

By Maz Woolley

When listing my collection I realised that I had a missing Parker Model. Although released some time ago this model is  is still available from Parker Models so I obtained one to complete my collection.

The Standard Vanguard was launched in 1947 with a classic 1940s American Style “beetle back” which looked modern when seen alongside many of the warmed over pre-war cars being sold by most other carmakers. Although sales were initially good Standard’s one model policy meant that they needed the cars to sell strongly and sales started to fall off as others launched their new post war models. In 1951 Ford launched the new Ford Consul and Zephyr which aped US Fordor styles and Vauxhall launched the Velox E series with its Chevrolet influence. Both ranges were three box saloons based on contemporary American styling.

Standard’s response was the Vanguard Phase II model which had been re-styled in a three box “notchback” shape. The boot size increased by 50% and the larger rear window improved visibility. At the front a new wide grille was added. Under the skin the car had changed little with some modifications to the suspension and tyres and a slight increase in engine compression. A contemporary test by The Motor magazine, without the optional overdrive, recorded a top speed of 80mph. In 1954 Standard became the first British car maker to offer a diesel engine as a factory fitted option. The chassis was stiffened to take the weight of the heavier engine and performance suffered with only a 66mph top speed.

Parker Models are 1:76 white metal kits primarily designed for the railway modeller. The model consisted of: A body shell with all features moulded in; a chassis with wheels, bulkhead and seats cast in; a steering wheel, and a vacform. The casting was clean and the painting and assembly of the model is straightforward. As usual with Parker Models the model captures the original car very well.


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Parker Models VE69 Wolseley Series II

By Maz Woolley

 

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Here we have Parker models VE69 which is a Wolseley Series II as made between 1935 and 1937. This is sold as a white metal kit which consists of a body shell, chassis, steering wheel, four wheels and a Vacform.  These models are primarily aimed at the model railway market but now that Oxford Diecast has popularised 1:76 as a collectors scale  I hope that they will be of more general interest.

The Wolseley was basically an upmarket Morris using many Morris components. 15,000 were said to have been made before the Series III was introduced. Unlike the Morris equivalent at the time, the Wolseley featured an overhead valve engine and four-speed gearbox, along with ‘Easiclean’ steel-pressed wheels.

The Series II is often used in TV detective series set in the pre-war years as Wolseleys were widely used by the police and other authorities.

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As usual the casting was clean and the kit assembled very easily. Unfortunately the vacform got lost and the model as shown has windows made using Krystal Klear.

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This model fills another gap and would display well alongside Oxford Diecast’s model of the larger Wolseley 18/85.


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Parker Models – Ford CX

By Maz Woolley

 

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Rod Parker produces white metal kits to 1:76 and 1:144 scale here in the UK.  These are predominantly aimed at railway modellers but also offer interesting models for 1:76 scale collectors which may never appear ‘ready made’. The model photographed for this article is VE67 which is a 1935-37 Ford Model CX.

The Ford model C/CX was a 10HP model which sold in smaller numbers than the 8HP model Y. Around 33,000 were made at Dagenham, some as kits for export.  The C was introduced in 1934 and after some small modifications it became a CX with the horizontal bars on the grille in 1935. Production ended in 1937 when it was replaced by the 7W which was the first of the “sit up and beg” style cars which lasted until the end of the 1950s. The C/CX used the 1172cc Ford Sidevalve engine which Ford only dropped at the beginning of the 1960s.

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It shows that shared models across European subsidiaries were not new when the Transit was launched in 1965 as the C and Y models were made in Germany as the Eifel and Köln, though with slightly re-styled grilles, and assembled in Spain too. Kits were also sent in knocked down form to Australia for local assembly.

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As ever the casting was very clean and little preparation was needed before painting, though care needs to be taken that if you are adding the lights after painting the model then make sure they will comfortably fit in the holes provided for them before spraying the shell.  The model is fairly simple to put together consisting of the body shell, chassis unit incorporating seats and dash, steering wheel, wheels, separate headlights, as well as a vacform. The wire wheels are quite sturdy but offer some challenges to paint and finish well as is evident from my photographs. Pictures show that the car seems to have been supplied as standard with wire wheels in the UK so they add authenticity even if they are fiddly to finish.

Even with my average modelling skills the model makes up well and it provides an example of yet another vehicle not yet made in this scale. Even in 1:43 the only previous model seems to be an obsolete Milestone Miniatures model.


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UK 1:76 scale White Metal kits

By Maz Woolley

Before Oxford Diecast started to make 1:76 scale models the only way that you could obtain models in this scale were to buy kits from a number of UK Artisan firms which produced models to that scale. Once Oxford’s cheap ready made offerings became available Artisan producers struggled to sell models and the market contracted quite quickly. Two who are still trading are John Day Models made by Daryl Toney and Parker Models made by Rod Parker.

Parker VE65 Austin Ten 1939/47

Another model that would look well on any UK Railway layout in the last days of steam. The Austin 10 stayed in service for a long time during the years after the Second World War when  cars were in scarce supply in the UK. The model is a nice representation of the real car though the radiator grille is difficult for someone with my limited skills to paint. Casting is clean and the Vacform fits well.

John Day Austin A70 Countryman 1950/54

This model has been seen in 1:43 scale from Pete Kenna. It was named Hereford succeeding the Hampshire that ran from 1947 to 1950.  This at a time when Austin cars were named after English counties. This is another model selected by Daryl Toney for re-mastering and is now a lot cleaner and sports the new style wheels which are separate rather than moulded into the base. The vacforms on the older John Day models were often poor fitting items but the new ones in these re-mastered models fit very well.

Parker VE62 Ford Pilot Estate Car 1947/51

This V8 Ford sold in relatively low volumes since it’s Canadian Bren Carrier derived side valve V8 engine attracted high vehicle tax rates and was not very economical either. The  Pilot was replaced by the Consul/Zephyr range which was a very much better seller. This vehicle is a must for any royal car collection in this scale since there is one in the Royal Collection. To replicate VUL 3 one would need to paint the model in dark green.

As usual the Parker model is a clean casting which captures the original well.


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