Category Archives: Ixo

Hachette Italy World Buses Part 22

By Fabrizio Panico

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

Numbers 64 to 66.

This article features three more European buses, and two of them have already been seen in another form. As predicted we see more mould re-use. It’s logical, and thankfully Hachette has made an effort so that the models are not differentiated by the livery alone. All of them are from the Italian Hachette partwork “Autobus dal mondo”, a collection of eighty 1:43 scale bus models, very similar to the French one “Autobus et autocars du monde”, produced in Bangladesh for Ixo.

No. 64 (no. 87 in the French collection) AEC Regent III RT London Country 1947 – We have already seen the AEC history and its Regent III RT (see part one, no. 3) and Regal III (see part six, no. 16). Its origins can be traced to the LGOC (London General Omnibus Company) which started producing its own motor omnibuses in 1909, and in 1912 was reorganised and set up as a separate concern for bus manufacturing, named Associated Equipment Company. The AEC Regent III was a double-decker bus chassis, introduced in 1938, and usually fitted with AEC’s 9.6-litre diesel engine at the front delivering 115HP. It was fitted with ‘Wilson‘ preselective gearbox and air-pressure operated brakes, with bodies from Park Royal (this model), Metro Cammell Weymann and so on.

Better known in the classic red Central London livery, the RT started a second life in the dark green colours of Green Lines when the new Routemaster started its service in Central London. After a first positive test with eight lines, in 1930 LGOC started a regular service in the London suburbs with a separate company, Green Line Coaches, identified by the green livery. Its fleet was composed mainly of single decker buses, but after the Second World War many Regent III RT changed colours due to their replacement with the new Routemaster. In 1970 the Green Line Coaches came under the control of the London Country Bus Services until 1986 when the transport sector was privatised across UK.

The scale model is quite heavy, as already seen in the previous red London version, with a metal diecast body and a well detailed plastic chassis fitted with a separate silver exhaust. Aside from the livery and the lettering, the only significant difference seems to be the addition of two small turn signals under the front destination board, listing a few borough and small towns in the London commuter belt.

The front grille also appears slightly different. As usual many small separate parts are fitted like lights, rear mirrors, a single wiper, front grille, and a fuel cap. The interior is quite basic, and the presence of three metal supports doesn’t help at all. Their presence is not fully justified, the metal body should be strong enough without them. A few small ads on the rear side help to liven up the sober livery. No apparent differences to the French edition. A good reproduction, but a bit disappointing, many would have preferred a more common Green Lines single-decker bus.


No. 65 (no. 88 in the French collection) Mercedes Benz O 305 Frankfurt 1979 – We have met the German giant many times : the gargantuan 1938 O 10000 (see part one, no. 2), the midget 1936 Lo 3100 (see part four, no. 11) and the bright 1972 O 302 (see part eleven, no. 31), all of them more touring coaches than urban buses. But we have already met also the O 305, even if in the “French edition” by Heuliez (see part fifteen, no. 45), when the always very strong French nationalistic spirit pragmatically preferred the Mercedes O 305 to the Berliet and Saviem offers, but required that “all the buses exported to France to be bodied by Heuliez”. The Mercedes Benz O 305 was the product of the standardisation requested by the VoV (Verband Offentlicher Verkehrsbetriebe), the Association of German Public Transports, looking for a low floor 11 metres bus. Designed for use as a single-decker bus, it was later redesigned to accommodate double-decker bodies.

It was built as a complete bus or as a chassis only and more than 16,000 were made from 1969 to 1987, of which almost 4,800 were chassis only units. The engine was an horizontal six in-line diesel producing 210HP. This was positioned at the rear of the bus and was very reliable and almost noiseless. The body had a squared shape with large windows, round headlamps and only two doors, tickets being issued by the driver. Two interior platforms existed in the centre and to the rear. This allowed more than 100 passengers to be carried, of which 41 were seated. The O 305 was replaced in 1983 by the new O 405 to be followed in 1997 by the O 530 (Citaro), a real revolution.

The model is shaped accurately and the orange and light brown livery appears authentic and neatly printed. The body is plastic, as usual, with a metal baseplate with limited detail. A comparison with the Heuliez version identifies a different roof as well as different front and rear sections, though the sides are almost identical. Many small plastic separate parts are fitted, like wipers, mirrors, lights, and bumpers. It is fitted with accurate Frankfurt registration plates, while the destination board reads Monchhofstrasse. Monchhhof is a business park near the Frankfurt airport. There is only a basic interior, but a very detailed dashboard is fitted. On the sides ther are two large adverts for the “Deutscher Herold”, an insurance group whose origins can be traced to the 1922 German Burial Insurance Association of Berlin, an association of mutual insurance to allow the cost of burial as insurance benefits (useful, but a bit lugubrious). There is an added rear panel, simulating the access to the engine which is not reproduced. There are no apparent differences to the French edition. A nice reproduction of an emblematic German bus.


No. 66 (no. 89 in the French collection) Chausson APU/53 1953 – Obviously we have already met Chausson and its products : the 1950 APH (see part five, no. 14) and the 1956 ANG coach (see part eighteen, no. 53). Based in the Paris region from 1907, supplier of components for the automotive industry. In the 1930s Chausson started producing car and unitary bus bodies too. During the post war boom Chausson supplied thousands of buses to French cities, but in 1959 Saviem acquired all their buses activities and Chausson left that market. After the Second World War the RATP needed to replenish its fleet in a hurry and Chausson was among its main suppliers. Its APH, with unitary metal bodywork instead of the traditional use of a separate chassis, allowed a light and more efficient vehicle. Chausson developed from its first 1942 prototype the APE (petrol Panhard engine), followed by the APH (diesel Panhard engine) and the AH (petrol Hotchkiss engine). To accommodate the longer Hotchkiss engine it was necessary to extend its front cover, and to standardise it : so was born the ‘nez de cochon’ or ‘pig’s nose’. It was a success, but by 1952 the AP52 was updated with a new body style featuring a flat front, and windows added to the curved part of the roof to improve the brightness of the vehicle (the high floor limited the height of the roof).

The following APU/53 addressed another problem : the reduced size of the doors hindered the entry and exit of the passengers. A third central door was added, and the rear one enlarged. The engine was now a seven litres straight six diesel by Hispano-Hercules, developing 121HP. The roof height was improved in 1956 with the APVU, developed in five successive series, employed by the RATP mainly on suburban lines.

A plastic body and metal baseplate are used for the model sporting the classic RATP livery: dark green and cream. Unusually the baseplate doesn’t have any detail, only an added black exhaust. The nice side windows are well detailed. There is a basic interior, but the conductor and driver areas are well modelled. The added front lights, rear mirrors and the three wipers are all well done. Also well reproduced are the doors and the front Chausson logo. There are no registration plates which is normal for RATP vehicles. The destination board reads “Place du Pantheon”, which is near the Sorbonne University and the Luxembourg Gardens. The 84 line connects Place du Pantheon to the Porte de Champerret, on the north side of the Boulevard Périphérique. There are no apparent differences to the French edition. A model of a well known, and loved, Parisian bus.


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Do It Yourself!

The Easy, Medium and Hard Way…

By Sergio Luis dos Santos

All text and photographs are copyright of the author.

How many times do we want to have “that special version” from a specific car or racing event?  Sometimes we wait for years until it surfaces but what about those that never show up?  The only way to go is to customize an available model.

Some projects need only a few decals and some fine touches to be finished. More elaborate work might need a complete set of new decals for the entire car, but the most complicated ones need a complete repaint as well.

Here are the easy ones from my 1:43 collection.

1 – Minichamps released this Porsche 911 GT3 from the Porsche Michelin Supercup 2006 in a “neutral” livery without a driver’s name. This was the easiest one: no decals to be removed.  I added a set of white names for the side windows plus the smaller ones with the Brazilian flag above the doors provided by Jbot Decals. I left the rear window without the Senna name, since I could not locate any image to confirm this.

2 – Best Model released this Alfa Romeo 33.2 as the car driven by José Carlos Pace and Marivaldo Fernandes at 3 Hours of Rio de Janeiro in 1969. In reality, the model as it was released matches the car raced by Pace and Marivaldo at 500 Km. de Salvador.  For a correct Rio race car, a large Alfa Romeo badge was applied in the front white panel under the number 33. I also replaced the  small Alfa badge for a new one, both provided by Jbot Decals.

3 – In 1996 the International Touring Car Championship had a round at Interlagos, São Paulo on 27 October. This Alfa Romeo 155 V6 TI was the mount of British driver Jason Watt. Japanese driver Naoki Hattori drove it in the Japanese round, so HPI released it in Hattori markings. In the Interlagos race the car was driven by Max Wilson in the same livery, so a new set of Wilson in white for the side windows did the trick.

4 – Also in the ITC Championship in 1996, Ricardo Zonta drove this Mercedes Benz C Class in Germany at Nurbürgring on 1 September. This car was released by Minichamps as raced by Jan Magnussen from Denmark. A set of white large Zonta for the side windows and the smaller ones with the Brazilian flag for the hood provided by Jbot Decals were used. The real car is preserved as raced by the  Colombian Juan Carlos Montoya in Silverstone!

5 – Flávio “Nonô” Figueiredo drove this Vauxhall Vectra for the Vauxhall Sport team at the 1998 British Touring Car  Championship.  Onyx released both cars from this team, the number 88 of Derek Warwick and number 98 of John Cleland. Again Jbot Decals produced a set of Figueiredo names plus the new number 99 with a white background in a perfect matching size to cover the older ones.

Now let’s see the ones I call the medium category. In this category,  we must remove all decoration, decals, etc, and keep the original colors, sometimes with small color touch-ups.

6 – This Aston Martin DBR9 from IXO had all decoration removed with a new set of decals from Race Track Decals to finish it. Brazilian Fernando Rees had his debut in GT car racing at Mil Milhas Brasileiras 2007 at Interlagos with Gregor Finsken, Steve Zacchia and Roland Berville. A pair of small front wings were added to match period photos.

7 – Augusto Farfus, Gregor Finsken, Steve Zacchia and Roland Berville raced this BMW 320d at 24 Hours of Nurbürgring 2008 obtaining a 1st place in the S1 Class.  A Minichamps BMW 320si had all new decorations put on, then a new set of decals from Race Track Decals were used. Only color change was the external rear view mirrors in black.

Next are the hard ones… These models had all paint removed to add new colors plus custom made decals. Both models are based on real cars down to the license plates.

8 – Volkswagen Beetle, or as Mexicans say, Escarabajo. Using a Mexican taxi from an Altaya partworks collection, the old green and cream livery was changed to white and blue from Acapulco using automotive paint.

9 – This Volkswagen Santana is a taxi from Curitiba City, in Paraná, Brasil. In truth this is the Chinese VW version but a close match to the Brazilian one. This model belongs to a Del Prado partworks collection. The silver color was removed and replaced
by actual reddish-orange automotive paint obtained from an auto workshop through a friend doing a trip to Curitiba, who also provided some photos of the real taxi!

It’s worth mentioning here that the models in the medium and hard categories were made possible due the skills and hard work of my friend Afonso Giordano Netto.  He sadly passed way in December 2017.


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Hachette Italy World Buses Part 21

By Fabrizio Panico

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

Number 61 to 63.

Three more European buses : a German, and two French. A strange mix as we have already met all of them in this collection, in one form or another. They are from the Italian Hachette partwork “Autobus dal mondo”, a collection of eighty 1:43 scale bus models, very similar to the French one “Autobus et autocars du monde”, produced in Bangladesh for Ixo.

No. 61 (no. 84 in the French collection) Renault R 4192 1952 – We have already met Renault and the AGP Saharien (see part seven, no. 19), the TN6-C2 (see part twelve, no. 34) and the R4192 (see part nineteen, no. 55). Renault is one of the oldest automobile manufacturers, always facing strong competition and, thanks to its many successes, able to slowly incorporate many of its commercial vehicle making competitors after the Second World War.

The R4000 series was the first “modern” Renault bus, previously based on truck chassis, heavy and uncomfortable. Facing the Isobloc challenge (use of a self-supporting structure) in 1949 Renault presented the R4190 with a chassisless structure and the engine placed horizontally under the floor on the right side between the two axles. It was an instant success and was produced in many different versions (the R 4192 was a low roof version with a more powerful diesel engine), and it went on until 1993, with periodic updates.

The model is shaped accurately. The body is plastic whilst the chassis is metal with lot of detail. It has single rear wheels. Many additional small parts are fitted as usual: lights, front bumper, mirror (one only) and registration plates, plus a large ladder to reach the luggage area on the roof.

As already noted the mould was used on no. 55 (see part nineteen), no changes are apparent, only the livery is new, this time from Ets. Gonthier & Nouhaud, an urban and suburban passenger transport company from Periguex, a small town located in the Dordogne department in the New Aquitaine region (capital Bordeaux), south west of France.

It seems that the company was active from 1959 to 2012, when it was absorbed in the larger Régie Péribus, the transit network serving Périgueux and its wider community.

On the internet it is possible to find pictures of the real vehicle, with the same green and cream livery, the same strange advert on the front bumper and the same registration plate (24), correct for the Dordogne. No apparent differences to the French edition. A faithful reproduction of an once quite common sight on French roads.

 

 

No. 62 (no. 85 in the French collection) Berliet Crusair 3 1969 – We have already seen the Berliet history and its Crusair (see part eight, no. 22), the PHL 10 (see part ten, no. 30), the PR100 ranges (Jelcz version, see part fourteen, no. 40) and the PLR 10 (see part sixteen, no. 47). Founded in 1899, like Renault, Berliet is one of the oldest automobile manufacturer, part of Citroën from 1967, then acquired by Renault in 1974 and merged with Saviem into the new RVI in 1978.

After the Second World War only the commercial vehicle production was resumed, at first it was highly successful, but in the sixties the competition was very tough and resources to innovate were lacking, leading to the loss of its independence. The Cruisair range, developed from 1966, offered innovative technical solutions (rear engine) and a new aesthetic (straight lines and large windows), fixing new standards for the European buses.

 

Comfortable, reliable and profitable, but not free from defects, the Crusair was limited by its max length (11 metres), but achieved widespread success, and was assembled by Porto in Portugal, Heuliez in France and also in Algeria. Produced, under the Renault badge, until 1989, the Cruisair underwent few aesthetic changes: you could date the models only on the basis of updates to the front panels with a major modernisation made in 1972.

The scale model has a plastic body and a metal chassis. As usual there are small additional parts, like the front grille, bumpers, mirrors and wipers. As previously noted the mould was already used for no. 22 and no differences can be seen, only the front grille and light assembly is new, while the wheels are lacking chromed hubcaps.

According to Hachette no. 22 and no. 62 are both from 1969, but the different front grille and lights assembly dates no. 22 as a post 1972 version, while no. 62 is the original one. Also the livery is new, no. 62 sports the white and blue colours of Air France, in this case a shuttle service between the Orly and Le Bourget airports. The registration plate is coded 75, correctly from Paris (Île-de-France). Also for the Cruisair it is possible to find on internet some pictures of the very same real vehicle. No apparent differences to the French edition. A nice souvenir for lots of tourists of the Concorde years.

 

No. 63 (no. 86 in the French collection) Setra S14 1961 – We have already met the Setra company and its S215 HD, and the S14 by the Spanish Seida licensee. In 1951 the Wagenfabrik Kässbohrer in Ulm decided to create a new company dedicated only to buses. It was named Setra, short for “selbsttragend” (self supporting), referring to the integral nature of the construction. The modular system (same structure’s elements and same cockpit) allowed to change only the wheelbase, the engine power and the interior fittings.

The S14, presented in 1961, is considered one of the first modern European buses. Featuring a high windshield, with a thin central pillar, and a longitudinal rear engine by Henschel, a straight six diesel delivering 170 CV, the S14 was the mould for the whole range of Setra buses in the 60s. The S14 was a full-length 12-metre 55 seats vehicle, and despite being rather expensive it was very successful. In 1963 an agreement with Seida allowed to license-build chassisless coaches in Spain. They were equipped with Pegaso engines and marketed with simultaneous double badge as Setra Seida and Pegaso.

The model is accurately shaped and the livery seems to be authentic, on internet you could find many pictures of similar real vehicles. Anker Reisen is a travel company from Lüneburg, a “Hanseatic” town in the German state of Lower Saxony, located about 50 km southeast of the more famous Hamburg, and belongs to that city’s wider metropolitan region. The registration plates are correctly coded LG. As usual there is a plastic body and a metal chassis, The body is quite bright, helped by the red and light grey livery and plenty of windows, which are also fitted to the roof. Many small separate parts are fitted: front and rear bumpers, lights, front grille, wipers and rear view mirrors.

Hachette has created the original Setra version and partly modified the mould used for no. 24. The original details were erased from the baseplate and and new ones printed on. The body has been slightly changed with lights amended. The Kassbohrer logo has replaced the Pegaso one on the front grille and on the hubcaps. All the Seida logos have been replaced by the Setra ones. The side windows have been changed to show a different split design. There are no apparent differences to the French edition. After the integral (and a bit disappointing) re-use of the Renault R 4192 mould, it is heartening to see the effort made by Hachette to differentiate between the two S14s. We’ll see more mould re-use, it’s logical, but thankfully in some original and interesting ways. Altogether a nice and welcome model.


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BMC outside the UK

By John F. Quilter

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

Editors Note: John wrote this in response to the recent article posted on the Siam Di Tella which was a BMC hybrid made in Argentina. The article can be found here.

Here’s a little info on two BL products not made in the UK.

British Leyland and its predecessor BMC had many overseas operations over the decades. Here are two products of their overseas affiliates. The BMC J4 van, which was also badged as a Morris and Austin in the UK, was made in Spain by their operation there known as Sava.

This operation also made many of Leyland larger trucks as well. The J4 van, and there was a pickup and mini bus versions as well came after the J2 and before the Sherpa. Much of the sheet metal on the Sherpa was carried over but the engine was moved forward under a short bonnet rather than being between the seats as it was in the J4. The engine was BMC’s 1622cc petrol engine or a 1500cc diesel. Both part of BMC’s “B” series four cylinder engine range. This van is apparently made by Ixo and mine is done in a BMC service livery from a dealer in France. There are other liveries showing up on eBay as well. The J4 makes a good shelf item along with my Sherpa van (plus pickup and mini bus custom creations) and J2 by Oxford Diecast.

The second vehicle is from TRAX in Australia, a Morris Major Elite. This unique to Australia car, was essentially the centre section of a Riley 1.5 or Wolseley 1500 but Leyland Australia added a longer boot for more capacity and a longer front clip perhaps to balance off the look. It also used the 1622cc engine which was a step up from the UK produced Riley and Wolseley. The model is in TRAX’s limited range and is in resin. Available in two colours, the blue and white being one often seen back when the cars were new. The photo below shows the Elite along with its cousins the Wolseley and Riley both done in Brooklin’s Lansdowne range.


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1966 Cadillac Variations

By John F. Quilter

All text and photographs by, and copyright of the Author.

The Mexican partworks series offers a gold 1966 Cadillac Coupe De Ville which is, I believe, an Ixo production. This diecast is quite well shaped, of correct 1:43 scale and accurate in most details although most of these would have had white wall tires, at least when new. Since the partworks series cannot be subscribed to by USA residents I was able to find some enterprising vendors on eBay who were selling these and some others in the series. So I got three, one to leave stock, one to convert into a Sedan De Ville (which is actually a pillarless four door hardtop) and one to convert into a top of the line Eldorado convertible.

 

The sedan conversion was relatively easy as the roof length is the same on the coupe as the sedan but I still needed to break it down, strip off the gold paint and scribe in the four door configurations. Then it was just picking a colour for the exterior and interior and using my technique of making thin white walls using flattened thin gauge wire painted white. All these models benefit from a black wash to the egg crate grill.

 

The second conversion was the convertible and I chose to do the top of the line Eldorado which has its own side chrome trim and some badge differences. A jeweller’s saw is used to cut the roof off the coupe and a piece of sheet lead is used to form the convertible top boot. The side moulding is a piece of silver coloured wire laid on with some glue then painted with the model to ensure good attachment and finally scraped back to the chrome colour.

A coat of Testors Model Master gloss clear enamel adds the final touch of high gloss to the Krylon Fusion red base colour picked from Google images of period Cadillac colours for the Eldorado.

 


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The Piquet Racing Dynasty

By Sergio Luis dos Santos

All text and photographs copyright of the Author.

A few weeks ago, my previous post on racing dynasties was about the famous Brazilian family Negrão.  Perhaps more well known outside Brazil will be the Nelson Piquet family!

Nelson Piquet Souto Maior (his full name) is a well known name in motorsports with three Formula One championships. He has 5 sons and 2 daughters, surprisingly all them with connections with car or
motorbike racing! The sons Geraldo Piquet, Nelson Angelo Tamsma Piquet Souto Maior (better know as Nelson Piquet Jr. or Nelsinho Piquet), Pedro Estácio Piquet, Marco Piquet and Laszlo Piquet are active in racing. Julia Piquet did some kart races when young, and Kelly Piquet has worked in Formula E.

For sure, this looks like another dynasty that will have its name in car racing for a long time to come.  Some information about their career can be seen here in Portuguese: https://www.piquetsports.com/ . Also a search through the web will bring many more details.

Here are some “Piquet” models from my collection in 1:43 scale with no open wheels!

1 – BMW M1 Procar Series 1979 season. Nelson Piquet. Minichamps.

2 – BMW M1 Procar Series 1980 season. Nelson Piquet. Minichamps.

3 – BMW M1 Gr5 1.000 Km Nurbürgring 1981. Nelson Piquet and Hans Stuck. Spark.

4 -BMW M1 “Presentation”. Nelson Piquet and Hans Stuck. Very hard to find any info on this car. Maybe sponsored by H.I.S. Jeans? The box gives the year 1985. Model by Saphire using a resin kit from Baymo.

5- BMW M3 GTR. Mil Milhas de Interlagos 1995. Nelson Piquet with Paulo Carcasci and Sopper. Minichamps.

6- McLaren F1 GTR. 24 Hours Le Mans 1996. Nelson Piquet with Johnny Cecotto and Sullivan. Minichamps.

7- McLaren F1 GTR. 24 Hours Le Mans 1996. Nelson Piquet with Johnny Cecotto and Sullivan. HPI Racing.

8- McLaren F1 GTR. 2 Horas de Curitiba 1996. Nelson Piquet with Johnny Cecotto. Spark.

9- McLaren F1 GTR. 24 Hours Le Mans 1997. Nelson Piquet with J.J. Letho and S. Sopper. IXO.

10- McLaren F1 GTR. 24 Hours Le Mans 1997. Nelson Piquet with J.J. Letho and S. Sopper. HPI Racing.

11- Aston Martin DBR9. Mil Milhas Brasileiras 2006. Nelson Piquet, Nelsinho Piquet, Hélio Castro-Neves, and C.Bouchut. IXO.

12- Aston Martin DBR9. 24 Hours Le Mans 2006. Nelsinho Piquet with David Brabham and Antonio Garcia. IXO.

13- Aston Martin DBR9. 24 Hours Le Mans 2006. Nelsinho Piquet with David Brabham and Antonio Garcia. Altaya/IXO for partworks collection 24 Heures du Mans.

14- BMW Z-4. Blancpain Series 2014. Nelsinho Piquet and Matheus Stumpf. Spark.

15- Rebellion R-One AER. 24 Hours Le Mans 2016. Nelsinho Piquet with N. Prost and N. Heidfeld. Spark.

16- Oreca 07 Gibson. 24 Hours Le Mans 2017. Nelsinho Piquet with D-H. Hansson and M. Beche. Spark.

If anyone would like the rear view of any car, please let us know on Facebook!


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Siam Di Tella 1500

By Maz Woolley

Text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

BMC (British Motor Corporation) made their cars at plants around the world, particularly in the English speaking countries with close ties like Australia. They also licensed makers in other countries to produce vehicles using their body shells and components.

We are all familiar with Australian cars like the Morris Major that were based on BMC vehicles sold in the UK but heavily changed to suit local tastes.  Less familiar are the cars made by  Siam Di Tella in the Argentine.  A pickup based upon the Austin A50 (Pre-Farina) called the Argenta seems to have been made initially and was followed by the 1500 series which include a car, traveller and pickup (again called the Argenta) which combined a Farina Riley 4/72 front end with an Austin A55 rear and was fitted with a 1500cc B series engine later uprated to 1600cc in line with UK production.

Initially cars were made from knocked down kits but local production soon replaced that.  In the later years of production a Magnette was offered with an MG style front and rear end, a unique bonnet ornament. A stylised ‘S’ badge was fitted where an MG badge would have been  on the radiator but in later years an MG badge was used.

Given that we have yet to see a budget diecast Riley 4/72 it is amazing that Ixo/DeAgostini has created a Siam Di Tella 1500 Saloon and Taxi in their partworks series. We have of course had a lovely 4/72 from Silas Models but this is rather more fragile and expensive.

I read a review of the model that suggested that the Austin A55 mould used by Altaya may have been the basis for this model but a close examination shows that this casting is different in particular it is correctly narrower than the A55 which was too wide.

Group shots of the Altaya A55 [right], Silas 4/72 [left] and Siam Di Tella [middle] cars show the differences between the models.

The model of the Siam Di Tella looks good when compared to photographs which can be viewed on the web. The shape is convincing as are the front and back ends with all their inserted parts. Unique Siam Di Tella badging is printed neatly.

Inside the black moulding has full door car details and a really nice moulded dashboard and the large steering wheel is excellently modelled with the chrome horn ring included. No details are picked out which is a shame as this means most people will never appreciate the detail which is there.

The model leads me to musing on what might be. The 1:43 Vanguards range included excellent Austin Cambridge A60 saloon and its equivalent Morris Oxford. And since then Oxford Diecast has produced an Austin A60 to 1:76 scale. This leaves an opportunity for Oxford Diecast or Corgi to make the Riley, MG, and Traveller versions which would be very popular in 1:43 as well as 1:76. Or do we have to wait for someone to commission PCT Industries to create them?


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Auto Union 1000S Universal

By Maz Woolley

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

The South American part works series have thrown up a number of vehicles which are very similar to those produced in America or Europe. Readers will have seen John Quilter‘s conversions of several of these into American market vehicles, many never modelled previously in 1:43 scale. Here we see an Auto Union 1000S Universal estate car which was made in Düsseldorf, Germany, from 1959 to 1962 and was made under licence by IASFe (Industrias Automotriz de Santa Fe) between 1960 and 1970.

The name Auto Union was revived for this car which was a development from the 700cc DKW 3=6. It had a larger 1,000cc version of the same two stroke engine and included an autofuel mixer system so the motorist filled up a tank with two-stroke oil as well as one with petrol and the mixing took place in the carburettor. The Auto Union 1000 was sold as luxury compact front-wheel-drive car costing significantly more than a Volkswagen. Once the 1000S was out of production Auto Union lasted only a couple of years more under the ownership of Daimler-Benz before being sold to Volkswagen who used technology from the DKW F102 to lead it in to the front wheel drive era and develop its Audi brand.

This part work model is nicely made and well up to the standard of the better models made by Oxford Diecast. There appear to be few differences between the German and Argentinian production.

At the front the grille is nice though it would benefit from a black wash to tone it down. The lights are typical Ixo style with the peg giving it a visible centre. All bumpers are fitted with extra bars which do not seem to be common on German cars but which might have been an option. The Auto Union script on the bonnet is very fine.

The wheels are nicely replicated. The large painted steel wheels with small chrome hubcaps adorn many examples of surviving cars shown on the web.  At the rear there are small inserts and the reflectors are well replicated with red paint over a silver base. The Auto Union rings and the 1000 script on the rear door are neatly printed and the fuel filler has been very well modelled with a chrome cap on a black collar.

The side chrome strips are mostly fine though on my model the roofline is not without some missed areas. The interior is black and details cannot be seen without a light being used. The steering wheel and dash are moulded in some detail but with no picking out in colour and the door cards have texture and fittings moulded on, but again nothing is picked out. The seats are simply but well moulded.

These part work models originally cost very substantial amounts of money imported from South America but now many seem to be shipping from China. Be warned the price range for these models from eBay sellers is very wide indeed but with care they can be picked up shipped from China for less than the price of a cheaper 1:43 Oxford Diecast here in the UK.


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The Negrão Racing Dynasty

By Sergio Luis dos Santos

All text and photographs copyright of the Author.

Throughout all  sports it’s fairly common to find family dynasties where generations from the same family play the same sport. In motorsports it’s the same.  We may remember some well known racing dynasties, from short-lived ones like Hill, Villeneuve and Senna, to the longest ones like the Andretti, Piquet or Fittipaldi, just to name a few.

Here are some models from the Brazilian family Negrão: Alexandre Furnari Negrão (Xandi Negrão), Alexandre Sarnes Negrão (Xandinho Negrão or Alexandre Negrão Jr.) , Antônio Augusto Furnari Negrão (Guto Negrão) and André Negrão.

All models are in 1:43 scale.  [Click photo for larger image.]

  1. Audi TT-R – Mil Milhas de Interlagos 2004 – Xandi Negrão, Xandinho Negrão and Guto Negrão. Schuco.
  2. Ferrari F 430 GT2 – Mil Milhas Brasileiras 2007 – Alexandre Negrão, Alexandre Negrão Jr and Andreas Mattheis – ProModelTek.
  3. Aston Martin DBR9 – 24 Hours Le Mans 2008 – Xandinho Negrão with Peter Hardman and Nicki Leventis – IXO.
  4. Aston Martin DBR9 – 24 Hours Le Mans 2008 – Xandinho Negrão with Peter Hardman and Nicki Leventis – Spark.
  5. Alpine A-470 – 24 Hours Le Mans 2017 – André Negrão with N. Panciatici and P. Ragues – Spark.

And here are views of their other ends!

I hope you like them.


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Hachette Italy World Buses Part 20

By Fabrizio Panico

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

Parts 58 to  60

 

Three very interesting buses : from France, Germany and USA/Canada. All of them are from the Italian Hachette partwork “Autobus dal mondo”, a collection of sixty 1:43 bus models, very similar to the French one “Autobus et autocars du monde”, produced in Bangladesh for Ixo.

 

No. 58 (no. 50 in the French collection) Panhard Movic IE24 1948 – At last a vehicle from the oldest vehicle manufacturer: first to produce petrol engines (1887) under a license from Daimler, Panhard et Levassor sold their first automobile in 1890. Their first vehicles set many modern standards, it had four wheels, a clutch pedal to operate a chain-driven gearbox, a front-mounted engine and radiator, the first modern transmission and the steering wheel. This “state of the art” layout was called the “Système Panhard”. Before the Great War Panhard et Levassor was already one of the largest and most profitable manufacturers of automobiles. Between 1910 and 1924 Panhard et Levassor offered plenty of models with conventional valve engines, alongside cars powered by sleeve valve power units, a technology patented by the American Charles Yale Knight, and from 1924 till 1940 all Panhard cars used steel sleeve valve engines only. After the Second World War the company was renamed Panhard (without “Levassor”), and produced light cars making the bodies and several other components out of aluminium, mainly because of postwar government steel rationing. A false evaluation of production costs using that material pushed the firm close to bankruptcy, forcing a hurried return to steel. The last Panhard passenger car was built in 1967, after assembling 2CV panel vans and selling ownership progressively to Citroën. From 1968 Panhard only made armoured vehicles, and were then absorbed by Auverland and from 2012 by Renault Trucks Defense, a division of Swedish Volvo Group. Panhard built trucks from the 1910s, and during the Second World War made technical investigations for a new diesel engine, using the Lanova type of cylinder head in order to achieve an higher efficiency and a reduced noise. These engines were named 2HL, 4HL and 6HL according to the number of cylinders and where HL stood for “huile lourd” (heavy oil or diesel fuel). After the Second World War as part of the “Plan Pons” Panhard was grouped into the U.F.A (Union Française Automobile) together with Somua and Willème and entrusted with the manufacture of medium tonnage heavy goods vehicles.

In 1952 Panhard presented a vehicle with a seven tons of payload called Movic, a vehicle particularly well adapted to the reconstruction needs of the time, powered by either a 85 or 100 hp diesel engine, or a 90 or 110 hp petrol engine. Like many other firms Panhard used a five letter system to designate the vehicle class in order to facilitate orders (hence the Movic name), and a combination of letters and numbers to identify the chassis type (like IE24). The Panhard Movic IE24 used a 5 meters wheelbase and was able to transport fifty passengers, powered by the 4HL engine, with bodies by Currus or Besset. But production was always very limited and 1962 saw the end of any production of civilian trucks and buses.

The model is shaped accurately and the cream and green livery appears authentic and neatly printed. As usual there is a plastic body and a metal chassis with basic detail. A basic interior is fitted,and there are many small separately inserted parts, like wipers, mirrors, lights and chromed bumpers.

The red spot indicates that it is a regular line service. It sports the insignia of a transport firm from Mouthoumet, a small village in the Aude department, Occitaine region, in the south of France, and it is fitted with an accurate French registration plate, from the Aude department (11) prefecture of Carcassonne.

There is a very nice baggage rack on the roof, and a well modelled large rear ladder. There are no apparent differences to the French edition. A nice model of a simple tourist bus typical of the 1950s.

 

 

No. 59 (no. 48 in the French collection) General Motors “New Look” TDH-5301 1959 – We have already seen the GM history and its TDH-3610 (see part 10, no. 29) and its PD-3751 (see part 14, no. 41), Scenicruiser (see part 2, no. 4) and type 6000 School Bus (see part 3, no. 7), and how the more usual GMC badges did not appear until 1968, replacing GM, GM Coach and Yellow Coach badges previously used. The GM New Look bus (an official term used by GM), was introduced in 1959 to replace the previous transit buses, like the TDH-3610, and was available in both Transit and Suburban versions (less than 3,300 made). More than 44,000 units were produced by 1986 (from 1978 production in Canada only) and it soon becoming an iconic North American sight, and gaining the “fishbowl” nickname after its six-piece rounded windscreen.

The air-sprung self-supporting monocoque structure with aluminium frame and riveted body panels was powered by a rear transverse engine, a two-stroke V6 diesel by Detroit-Diesel, 238 cv, usually with an angle-drive single ratio automatic transmission. Its whole design, an airplane-like stressed-skin construction, was patented by GM (U.S. Patent D182,998), to avoid any unwarranted competition. As usual its denomination (TDH-5301) was a full technical description : T for transit bus, D for diesel, H for hydraulic transmission, 53 for the number of seats and 01 for the series. The first city to take delivery of the New Look was Washington D.C.. The New Look was particularly appreciated in Canada, with a local production of more than 11,000 units, while its heir, the RTS (Rapid Transit Bus), was almost rejected in Canada, pushing GM to resume production of an updated New Look (the Classic) from 1982.

The scale model is based on one of the Canadian buses, with the blue/silver and ivory livery typical of the Toronto Transit Commission. It has a plastic body and metal baseplate which is detailed and has an added silver exhaust. This is a very large model in 1:43 scale and is fitted with a correct interior and a nice driver area.

Very well reproduced side windows with silver frames are included. The usual added plastic parts can be found: lights, wipers, mirrors, bumpers. There are nice wheels with the correct twin rear ones.

The line number is 71, from St. Clair Avenue to Runnymede station (Runnymede is a residential neighbourhood on the western side of Toronto’s downtown core, not far from the shore of lake Ontario). The registration plate is a correct one for Ontario from 1961 (white on black). Again there are no apparent differences to the French edition. A nice reproduction of a much loved Canadian bus.

 

 

No. 60 (no. 49 in the French collection) Borgward BO 4000 1952 – The origins of the company go back to 1905 with the foundation in the Bremen area of NAMAG, maker of the Lloyd car, and of Hansa Automobilgesellschaft, due to merge in 1914 to form the “Hansa-Lloyd-Werke A.G.”. After the Great War the company soon faced bankruptcy, but Carl Borgward, already owner of the Goliath-Blitzkarren business, took control of it, greatly expanding the scope of his auto business and broadening the products range. 1939 saw the first use of the Borgward name as a brand, while the Second World War saw the production of many military trucks, half-tracks and munitions, but also lead to the destruction of Factories due to heavy Allied bombing. Notwithstanding the buildings destruction, the tools were almost untouched and it was possible to restart truck production before the end of 1945, and cars from 1949.

Like many other buses in the aftermath of the Second World War the BO 4000, launched in 1951, was strictly derived from the B 4000 truck, in turn heir to the B 3000, produced in large numbers during the war. Powered by a straight-six five litre diesel engine with ‘turbulence’ combustion chambers, it was very efficient. The bus was produced for three years only, and sold less than two hundred units, so it is a rare bus indeed.

But it must be said that though Borgward produced in total only 631 buses it made more than 43,000 trucks. Borgward buses were very expensive and often created to order: clearly the company had difficulty in amortising production costs on such small production volumes, leading to troubles in competing in the marketplace and in assuring the needed cash-flow. This despite being a pioneer in air suspension and automatic transmission. In 1961 the company was forced into liquidation by creditors, even if they were then paid in full. Many spoke of a conspiracy, but it is doubtful if Borgward trading beyond 1961 would be able to generate sufficient cash to repay existing debts and any new borrowing needed.

The scale model is an accurate reproduction of the only existing BO 4000, a preserved bus still in use on the Sylt isle, the fourth-largest German island in the North Sea, nowadays connected to the mainland by the Hindenburgdamm, an 11 km-long causeway joining from 1927 the North Frisian island to mainland Schleswig-Holstein, which is exclusively a railway corridor. The model is shaped accurately and the blue and light grey livery with a black roof appears authentic and neatly printed. The body is plastic, as usual, with a metal baseplate which is well detailed and has an added silver exhaust. Due to the large side and roof windows, which are well executed, the interior appears full of light and is fitted with nice seats. Many small plastic separate parts are used, like mirrors, lights and bumpers, plus width indicators at the front and a towing hitch at the rear.

It is fitted with accurate British occupation zone registration plates. On the sides we see the logo of the Wander Falke (the peregrine falcon) and a very small plate, probably identifying the coachbuilder. Nice chromed hubcaps are fitted and the correct twin rear wheels. There are no apparent differences to the French edition. A good choice, a rare and likeable bus .


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