Category Archives: Model Makers

Who made the model

Oxford Diecast Rolls-Royce 25/30

By Maz Woolley

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

The model featured in this article is a recent release from Oxford Diecast. This is diecast to 1:43 scale in China for the UK. This is the second release using this casting. And continues the steadily release of Rolls-Royce licensed models from Oxford Diecast.

43R25002 Rolls-Royce 25/30 Thrupp and Maberly.

Just over one thousand and two hundred 25/30s were built between 1936 and 1938. It was an updated version of the 20/25 with a larger six cylinder engine of 4.2 Litres better able to carry the larger coach built bodies sometimes fitted. Other coachbuilders who built cars on this chassis were: Park Ward, H. J. Mulliner, Arthur Mulliner and Hooper. 

Thrupp and Maberly were a well respected coach builder based in Cricklewood in North London.  They even built the bodywork for Sir Henry Segrave‘s land speed record car, the Golden Arrow. They were acquired by the Rootes Brothers and started building top of the range Humber bodies from the early 1930s alongside bespoke bodies for Rolls-Royce, Bentley and Daimler chassis. As coach building declined after the Second World War they concentrated on the special bodied and open cars for the Rootes Group finally closing in 1967.

The car modelled by Oxford may be seen on the web and has chassis number GMP-37 and is registered BUE995, a Dudley plate, as printed on the plates on the Oxford model. The body style is stated to be that of an ‘owner driver sports saloon’. It is finished in a very deep green over black with an interior of black leather  and woodwork. Oxford have captured this well with the green looking considerably darker than the photographs show. A sunroof is fitted and Oxford have replicated that in a closed position.

The side view of the car shows how well the shape of the car has been caught by Oxford. The wheels are neatly done and initially I thought missed RR on the hub centres but looking at pictures of the real car I do not think they feature on that either.

Again the front three quarter view shows how good the model is capturing the curves which make the body a long way from a simple box shape. The real car has two auxiliary lights and not just one. The car released first, 43R25002, was based on BSG527 and that does have a single auxiliary light.  The rear view mirrors on BUE995 do not rise up anywhere near as much as they do on this model which can again be attributed to the fact they are based on those fitted to BSG527.

The rear three quarter view is excellent with the sculptural shape of the body work well captured.  The chrome mouldings round the ventilator in front door window, front screen, bonnet and sides are all printed crisply and finely. The trafficators are neatly highlighted in silver in the B pillars and the door locks printed on a raised part of the casting.

The interior is well done with dull black plastic leather finish, the wood trim well captured, and winder and door handles all picked out in silver on the door cards which are correctly painted black. The dashboard has been well modelled and appears to have some printed detail, though without taking the model apart it cannot be clearly seen.  The steering wheel is neatly moulded and has the large centre section for the advance/retard levers and horn.

The traditional grille has been moulded very well and there is a fine ‘Spirit of Ecstacy’ mascot on top. The RR initials are printed on the radiator shell but can only be seen when magnified. The lights are good with clear lenses but lack the three fine lines which should be seen on the face of the headlight glass.

To the rear another minor variation from the original car can be seen. The rear lights set on the rear wings are different to the ones fitted to BUE995 which are circular shapes on a chrome fitting which runs above and below the light. Here the lights are those fitted on BSG527 and many other 25/30s which are rectangular and jut out of the wing at the top of the housing.  Lights round the rear number plate are printed well with the multiple lens sections created by the printing. Even the small reflectors under the  rear bumper are captured.

The exhaust is fitted with a  fan shaped end but again this is not fitted to the car that the model is based on which has a simple pipe to the rear. Perhaps this is another feature carried forward from the first release of the casting.

Whilst the model has many small faults if you are looking for an exact replica of the original car on which it is based it is a great model overall. When judging it I also have to remember that this is a mass market, budget priced model, and not an expensive resin item. I think that Oxford Diecast show what they can do with their Rolls-Royce models which show a lot of detailed care and attention in design and manufacturing, something sadly lacking elsewhere in their ranges from time to time. There are compromises made but overall I think that they are making some of the nicest Rolls -Royce models available today with the great benefit that you will not get them out of store to find chrome parts peeling and dropping off as happens on many resin models.


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Some 2017 Racing Champions

By Maz Woolley

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

Racing Champions Mint is a brand licensed by Round 2 from Tomy who acquired the brand when it bought Ertl. Round 2 are now re-using old moulds from Racing Champions and Ertl to create a Racing Champions Mint line. So the brand is now produced by the same company that makes AutoWorld and Johnny Lightning being run by the same people who originally ran Playing Mantis and revived the Johnny Lightning name originally devised by Topper.

Products under this brand sit between the AutoWorld 1:64 models aimed at discerning collectors of 1:64 and Johnny Lightning which is the fun, play brand.  They are all ‘3.25 inch models’ with some scaling out at 1:64 but others varying from the quite markedly. Looking on the web site it looks like releases have slowed in 2018 with the first release being based on racing cars which again seem to vary in scale considerably.

Here we look at some of the cars released in 2017.

The photograph above shows the scale variation with the 1967 Plymouth smaller than a 1960 Corvair. Whilst nice models in many respects Racing Champion Mint certainly has a ‘fit the box’ approach.

1967 Plymouth Fury New York City Police 2017 Release 1 Version A

The model shown above is an attractive 1967 Plymouth Fury in the ‘America’s Finest‘ sub-range. The livery used is for New York City Police. Pictures usually show the dark green area extending all along the side but I am sure this variation has been researched by Round 2 as they also sell a variation with full length green paint. The Fury badge has even been printed on the wings which is a nice touch.

Under the bonnet is a simple engine  and as can be seen above the bonnet is a good fit and the front lights though painted on work well with the nicely moulded grille.

Police markings are neatly printed and the rear lights, bumper and panel are neat mouldings. The somewhat heavy and square late 1960s  shape has been well captured. Sadly the green painted areas were not masked well and there is a lot of feathering around the edges and they do not align completely with the door shut lines as they should.

The wheels have the correct small hub cap fitted to police cars and a representation of the all steel wheels though the plastic used makes the wheels look much too shiny.

 

1958 Ford Edsel Release 2 2017 Version B

Bigger in every dimension than the Fury this Edsel has no model stated though when you blow up the photographs the script on the front wing might read Pacer which was one of the smaller Edsels based upon the Ford chassis.

Sadly the bonnet is ill fitting and sits above an Edsel horseshoe grille that is fitted at crazy angle. which makes the front look even more like it has been damaged parking.

The two tone paint, chrome printing and badging are nicely done. With finely printed Edsel lettering on rear wings. To the rear the bumper is ok, if a little plastic in appearance and the rear lights are printed on with fine surrounds.

The side view shows that the shape is neatly captured and the hard top nicely modelled. The top is in plastic presumably so the lower casting can also be used to make a convertible.

A colourful engine sits under the bonnet but as usual with models this size lacking in detail.

 

1960 Chevy Corvair Release 2 2017 Version B

GMs attempt to get back sales from the imports from the likes of Volkswagen. A rear wheel drive car which was released after cost cutting measures had left it with a poor suspension solution leaving it suffering from tail heavy handling problems which lead to Ralph Nader’s ‘Unsafe at any speed’ statement. Though GM quite quickly resolved the issues the car was never the success they hoped for.

This model is consistent in size with the Edsel but rather larger than the Fury which in real like was nearly 10 inches wider.

As the photograph shows the front lights are fitted crookedly bu here they can be twisted into a better alignment.

This is a model of the two door coupe which leaves a rather odd long rear deck,  used for the hood on the convertible which looks more balanced. The model is nicely painted though the casting seems rather bland to me failing to capture some of the sharp lines the designers used to add variety to the cars surface.

Rear lights are just paint on moulded casting extensions and the printing is not aligned well.

The wheels are not really typical of the models I can see online but may be OK as many cars seem to be fitted with custom fake wires.

At the rear we see the low mounted suggestion of an engine under to rear cover.

The revival of Racing Champions makes available again some classic fit the box castings and few accurate 1:64 castings from Ertl days. Build and finish quality is only ‘so so’ even though these models attract a premium price in the US. I am not sure whether Round 2 will invest a lot of effort into this range as it already has Johnny Lightning addressing the lower part of the premium market and Autoworld addressing the top-end of the US 1:64 premium market.

For all their faults this series of models will please many who will otherwise have to seek out theses castings on the secondary market.


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Atlas Dinky 1455 Citroën CX Pallas

By Maz Woolley

All text and photographs by, and copyright of the Author, unless otherwise stated.

Here is another car from the continental ‘Dinky with opening parts‘ series which was boxed but without a certificate by a China based seller on eBay. It may of course appear in the UK Deluxe Dinky series at some point but that is yet to be seen. Dinky 1455 Citroën CX Pallas is from the final years of Dinky France when the models were being made under contract in Spain. Dinky launched the model in 1978 and it only appeared in metallic blue.

As the photograph above shows the later Dinky Toys lost the lovely box artwork which had been such a feature of French Dinky models. Although pictured with yellow headlight lenses the model actually had clear ones fitted. Separate plastic lenses are fitted front and rear  which is stated as one of the model features on the box.

The CX was produced by Citroën from 1974 to 1991 replacing the DS and over a million were made. The Pallas was an upmarket variant of the model. Originally intended to be powered by a three rotor wankel engine the poor fuel economy meant that this was dropped before the cars launch.

One of the features of the model is number plates front and rear which are for Department 75 which is Paris.

The side veiw shows a complete lack of painted items though handles and rubbing strips are moulded in. The tyres have Dunlop moulded in in overscale lettering.

Opening features are limited to the doors and the photograph below shows that they didn’t even correctly replicate the Citroën single spoke steering wheel though the interior has some details moulded in it is not very accurate.

 

All in all a good toy and as usual to 1:43 scale. And a reminder of the way Dinky began to lose ground to other model makers at the time neither keeping up on play features or making models more detailed and accurate.


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Atlas Dinky #541 Autocar Mercedes-Benz

By Maz Woolley

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

Models from the now completed continental Atlas Dinky series frequently appear on eBay to be shipped from China with no certificate but fully boxed. As many of these are unlikely to be easily available in future I buy the ones I like as and when they are listed. Dinky 541 issued in 1963 and withdrawn in 1973 is a model that I bought recently. It was worth getting as it included the reproduction of the lovely period box art showing the bus full of tourists taking in the scenery.

The Mercedes-Benz O 319 series of small buses was based upon its L 319 van introduced in 1955. The bus variant was made available to provide a fourteen seater which was larger than Volkswagen‘s ubiquitous Transporter. It was often produced with panoramic windows like those fitted to the Volkswagen Samba. Powered by a choice of petrol and diesel engines from the passenger car range it was a stylish step up from the Transporter and a practical size for local work and tourist trips.

Despite the picture on the box the model was made by Dinky France with a white upper and red lower portion as it is modelled here. However, Atlas also made it with a silver upper section and yellow lower with a PTT logo. Some sources say that only a handful of the original models in this livery are known suggesting that it was perhaps a colour trial and never issued. Obviously the Atlas models in the attractive PTT finish were very popular with collectors but even this reproduction from Atlas appears to be scarce.

The French Dinky model is well replicated and like the original is sparing with the silver highlights which are only used on the front for grille, bumper and chrome trim. To the rear only the bumpers are highlighted. The sides are devoid of any highlighting for the door handles, side indicators or trim strips.

Although silver highlights are not applied the side strips are modelled and as is the Mercedes-Benz logo on the boot lid. Side and rear lights are moulded but left in body colour.

On the roof the panel joins and the small ventilator are moulded in as are the panoramic windows.

Inside the seats and interior are modelled to a good standard for models made in the 1960s.

All in all a rather nice replica of the original Dinky model and one I am pleased to add to my collection.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Bond in Motion

By Maz Woolley

All text by the Author. Illustrations from Eaglemoss.

Regular readers will remember the GE Fabbri James Bond partwork which ran in several countries several years ago. Indeed attend most  UK toyfairs and you will find a table selling stock left over from the collection with, or without the magazine.  The Author collected the better models from the collection and they featured from time to time in the print edition of MAR. Well ‘Bond is back‘.  Eaglemoss, best known recently for their continental Opel Collection, bought GE Fabbri  some time ago and has now relaunched the Bond series under the title ‘Bond in Motion‘. This title is a ‘tie-in’ to the current ‘Bond in Motion’ exhibition at the London Film Museum which features one hundred original vehicles and artefacts from all 24 films.

The illustrated magazine has had a stylistic makeover but has very similar contents to the one provided by GE Fabbri. These magazines were better than many as they have access to EON productions film pictures and posters which they use in profusion.

As far as the models are concerned the collection starts predictably with an Aston Martin DB5 from Goldfinger at a discounted price. After that the price is increased to a standard price.

 

Those that subscribe to the collection will get two free gifts as shown above but these will come after they have subscribed to a minimum number of parts in each case.

 

The original GE Fabbri James Bond series used Universal Hobbies as the supplier of models until around part 100 and then used Ixo and UH from that point onward. All the models shown in the web site  illustrations so far are from the earlier part of the series and are made by UH. The original series ran to 134 parts it remains to be seen how many parts the new one will consist of.

The models all come in boxes with illustrated back drops and some have additional modelling to the base though that had disappeared by the end of the series.

Some of the models are made in action poses with boots open or weapons deployed which makes them less attractive to general model collectors but suited many Bond fans. Though again the models became more and more standard as the collection progressed.

Some cars feature damaged glass or even damaged metalwork. The BMW shown above has shot out windscreen and weapons deployed for example. The Sherpa had dents modelled in.

The Aston Martin V8 Vantage above has skis fitted, rockets deployed to the rear and has a modelled ramp in the base. It also has figured fitted driving it which is quite often the case until the final part of the collection.

Other cars are more basic like this nice DBS which again has a good moulded base. DBS models are not common so this budget model has been popular to general collectors and not just Bond Collectors. If you want to see the collection then it is advertised on Eaglemoss’ web site at https://bondinmotion.herocollector.com

It remains to be seen how well the collection is received as many collectors will have subscribed to the original series or bought the cars they want on the secondary market. But after Atlas departure from the collectors scene one DeAgostini competitor is  clearly ‘testing the water’ of the UK subscription series market.


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Breaking Bad Chevy

By Maz Woolley

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

Greenlight have a large number of TV and Film related vehicles in their ranges in scales from 1:18 to 1:64.  A few also make it into 1:43 scale like the licensed vehicles from the Fast and Furious franchise. Here we look at the 1982 Chevrolet Monte Carlo which is Jesse Pinkman’s car in the TV series Breaking Bad which was a phenomenal success a few years ago. This has been released in 1:64 scale previously when the mobile home from the series was also released. Later it was released as a 1:43 scale model diecast in China. In some cases Greenlight then go on to release a standard car using the same casting as they have with the Lincoln Continental amongst others. but haven’t done so with this one yet.

The 1982 Chevrolet Monte Carlo was the second year of the fourth generation of this car which is a two door coupe based on the same chassis as the Buick Regal, Pontiac Grand Prix and the Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme. In 1982 the Monte Carlo was not at its best, the turbo had been withdrawn and two diesels introduced. Interior options no longer included a bucket seat sports pack. The car was losing its previous muscle car image.

Later the car became popular with customisers as it was cheap and mechanically simple with a front engine and rear wheel drive unlike the GM cars that followed it which introduced the FWD engine/drive units in the Monte Carlo and its ‘siblings’.  In Breaking Bad the car is customised as a low rider but the model doesn’t really reflect this although the wheels are spaced out further than standard.

The Greenlight model is about the same standard as the models made by Universal Hobbies for the James Bond Partwork. Interestingly the Greenlight details on the base are all printed on but ‘1/43 made in china’ is moulded in. This suggests to me that the car will be available to other brands as a standard model later.

The wide track is achieved by fitting spacers in between the wheel and the base which again suggests that the car will be made later with a standard track width.  The wheels are a reasonable match to the car in the TV series but the whitewall is an entirely different place from that on the TV car.

Whilst many of the details are good. The grille is nice, as are headlights and the emblem on the bonnet. However the inserted rear window has a slightly crude surround and the plating is inconsistent and does not colour match the printed chrome round the front door and screen.

The rear lights are nicely made inserted parts with the chrome rims and the motif on the lights well done. The wipers are fine plastic items which look much more convincing than thin one dimensional  PE items fitted to many resin models.

The quality of the paint finish is excellent and the number plates are as used in the programme. The door mounted mirrors are nicely made and even have reflective ‘glass’ fitted.

Looking inside the car there is a lot of moulded details but apart from the steering mounted gear lever in silver it is all in black. Interestingly the back window and rear side windows are privacy glass but pictures of the TV car show them as clear glass.

Models of American cars of the 1980’s are not that common so even though GM sold only just over 90,000 of the 1982 Monte Carlo it is a welcome addition to the shelf.


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News from the Continent April/May 2018 releases from Schuco

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

All text by, and copyright of the Author. Photographs have been provided by the Manufacturer.

Here we look at models released by Schuco from April 2018 onward. We will look at April and May in turn. As usual quite a variety of models will be produced across the various ranges.

April 2018 releases

Piccolo

This is Schuco’s nostalgia range to approximately 1:90 scale. It is inspired by the classic Piccolo toys of the past.

450559300 “The little Volkswagen mechanic”

Volkswagen Beetle and Transporter T1 bus in an assembling box

 

450153700 Setra S8 Coach

 

450128900 Mercedes-Benz Pullman tractor with low loading trailer and Porsche tractor

Edition PRO.R43

This is the 1:43 scale section of Schuco’s premium resin range of detailed models.

450887300 Triumph TR5 with closed Surrey Top, red and black interior

 

450887400 Triumph TR5 with open Surrey Top, black and red interior

Edition PRO.R18

The premium resin range to 1:18 scale

 

450011300 Volkswagen Beetle “Motorhome” – yellow

 

Military 1:87

This is a diecast range of military items with a  focus on current vehicles.

452635600 Yak three-axle truck “German Bundeswehr” with camouflage

 

452635500 Gepard Anti-aircraft tank “German Bundeswehr” with camouflage

May 2018

Piccolo

More nostalgic material in this rang. Piccolo models used as game figures for an old fashioned board game. No computers just drawing and dice here!

 

450513500 “The big Piccolo tractors race” board game with 4 Piccolo tractors

Edition 1:43

The standard diecast range with these made to 1:43 scale

 

450347500 Set “Goggomobil” Goggo Limousine and Goggo small transporter

Edition PRO.R43

Premium resin models in 1:43 scale

450902400 BMW 850i Cabriolet – red

 

450902500 BMW 850i Cabriolet – blue

Edition 1:32

Here Schuco are competing with Britains, Ros and others with 1:32 scale diecast agricultural, and agricultural derived models.

 

450778500 Güldner G75 A tractor pulling fairground caravan with balcony

Edition 1:18

The large diecast range from Schuco

 

450028700 Volkswagen Transportet T1b Samba bus – black and white

Military 1:87

Diecast recent and  contemporary military models

 

452636500 Volkswagen T2a bus “German Bundeswehr”

452636700 Mercedes-Benz /8 saloon “Commander staff car German markings


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Jaguar Station Wagons

By John F. Quilter

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

A brief history of Jaguar Station Wagons: some in 1:43 scale.

Station wagons have always been part of the motoring scene in Europe although perhaps not as large a part of the market as they were in the USA from the early 1950s to the 1980s when mini vans and SUVs and more recently crossover vehicles began to displace them in popularity. In England in the 1930s there were custom built station wagons which the English called ‘Estate Cars‘ due to their popularity as utility vehicles on and around country estates,  or in some cases Shooting Brakes which were designed to carry shooting parties to the shoot with their guns,  ammunition, and refreshment. These were often wood framed body conversions on a production chassis. Woodies in American lingo. There were such conversions on Rolls-Royce, Bentley, and even Allard cars not to mention the more common Fords such as the Ford Pilot. Like in the USA these were often built by speciality body builders making for quite a variety of styles over the decades. The Morris Minor Traveller, a wood bodied estate was an in house project and was made by BMC and British Leyland from 1953 to the end of production in 1971 and it may well have been one of larger volume longest running estates, production wise. By the end of the 1950s, all metal wagons became the norm and BMC produced some of these such as the Morris Oxfords and Austin Cambridge. Others from their rivals  included Ford Consul (body conversion by Farnham) and Vauxhall Victor and Cresta PA, (body conversion by Friary and in some cases Grosvenor). Others built estate cars in house like Rootes Group whose Hillman Minx and Hillman Husky were factory built and Standard Triumph whose Standard Vanguard and 8/10, Triumph Herald, and Triumph 2000 ranges all offered  factory built estate cars. All these were lower line, or mid line, family cars where the estate car market was larger than the market for estate car versions of luxury cars. Jaguar being an up market product left the limited demand for wagons to speciality builders who often did only a handful for specific (and well healed) customers.

 

A little research on the Jaguar side shows that there were estate car conversions of the Mark II, Mark IX, and others such as the Lynx Eventer shooting break conversion on the mid 1980s to 1990s XJS and during the same era there was the Ladbroke-Avon conversion of the Jaguar XJ6/XJ12 Series III sedan. Compared to the XJ40 estate wagon prototype and conversions, the Series III did not lend itself as well to an estate modification. Its wide C pillar and slopping deck lid made for a bit of a strange look for the wagon. Its rear hatch with the oversize window seemed awkward as well as the large trapezoidal shaped rear side window.

The next generation of Jaguar saloon (the XJ40 body) was the base for some better looking and handsome estate conversions and it is known that two were built, designed by Chris Humberstone of Chris Humberstone Design Ltd. in 1988 for Hatfields of Sheffield and apparently a third one was built for an American customer and has been seen at some club events. The XJ40 conversion comes off as a better more integrated design than the Series III. The Series III retained the dual fuel tanks although with relocated fuel fillers. The entire conversion was in metal without any use of fibreglass panels. There was a also an official Jaguar XJ40 estate prototype built which never went into production. Quite handsome, it differed from the others in the D pillar area and rear hatch. In silver with lattice wheels it escaped a prototype destruction has been spotted at the Lincolnshire North Jaguar Enthusiasts Club events in the UK and differs in colour from the Humberstone designed one often seen in dark blue with lattice wheels, or wires wheels on the LHD version.

Going back to the XJS this conversion was done by Lynx Engineering who were formed in 1973 in Sussex and were known for C and D Type replicas and a few XJS convertibles before Jaguar got in the business for the USA 1989 model year. After their XJS convertibles, Lynx did have another variation on the XJS theme and this was the Eventer which was a shooting break conversion with a large rear hatch giving access to a long flat floor to accommodate luggage or whatever one puts in a shooting brake. All together Lynx produced about 67 of these, 52 in pre-facelift style and 15 post facelift, 18 left hand drive and 49 right hand drive. And just a few were made using the AJ6 six cylinder engine. The prototype of the Eventer was shown in 1982 and the last production was in 2002.

The Mark II station wagon, of which only one was made, known as a County, was produced from an idea by Mike Hawthorn who commissioned coach builders Jones Brothers to undertake the conversion. Unfortunately the car was only finished following his death. It became known as the MK II Country. Jaguar ended up using the car as fast assistance car for the factory racing saloons.

I also include a Mark IX conversion which although billed as a hearse it could well pass for a station wagon with some re-configuring of the interior. Fairly attractively modified from the sedan and devoid of an exaggerated raised roof it could have doubled as an estate car. It was an early example of a car with a hatchback. Details of the maker of this conversion are not readily available but it was produced before Jaguar’s launch of the Daimler DS420 cars which were loosely based on some of the mechanicals of the Mark X saloon. Being a much larger car it was more suitable for a conversion to a hearse and there were many various conversions done over this car’s long production run.

And finally, there is Jaguar’s first in-house production wagon, the X Type, the first Jaguar designed by Ian Callum and launched a few years after the saloon version. Known as the Sportwagon in the USA it was not a big seller but was notable as the first true Jaguar production wagon. A pity, as it seemed a useful and well-designed variation of the X Type but it carried the same Ford Mondeo stigma as the sedan.

In the ever comprehensive world of 1:43 scale models each of the above mentioned cars have been replicated in miniature either in the past or currently. The earliest being the Mark IX which was done by two model makers, the French company Provence Moulage as a resin kit and as a fully built model by Milestone Miniatures in white metal. Both are rare and long out of production. Provence Moulage also did the Mark II County as a resin kit. Moving to more recent items the Ladbroke Avon Series III XJ wagon is a product of Matrix scale models www.matrixscalemodels.com It was produced in pale primrose or light metallic blue and also has some chassis detail. However, these resin collectable replicas are produced in limited production numbers (albeit greater that the real car) and would now only be available on the secondary market.

The Lynx Eventer was done a number of years ago in resin as a kit by Provence Moulage in France. It came with BBS type accessory wheels, left hand drive and decals for the bonnet and hatch. The more recent Eventer was a Premium X model in a dark metallic blue, right hand drive and a biscuit interior. A fair amount of chassis detail is also provided. Wheels are the “starfish” type. Judging by the weight this item metal diecast. Interestingly, Matrix also did an Eventer, in light metallic blue but this one is a resin item.

The pictured Mark II County is a long obsolete built kit by Provence Moulage but more recently Matrix, who often seem to find rare and unique Jaguars to replicate, have produced a black County in resin with disc wheels. Certainly the Matrix version would be easier to find currently.

Going still more modern we have the circa 1988-1990 XJ6 wagon in dark metallic blue produced in miniature by NEO scale models. http://neoshop.replicars.nl/index.php. At this writing this model is currently available.

And finally, we have a replica of the first production Jaguar wagon, the X Type Sportwagon. This one was done by Premium X under their number PR095 in silver with left hand drive and even a tiny leaper on the hood, and some chassis detail showing the dual exhaust systems and suspension. The interior is two tone black and grey.

Although not truly a station wagon there is already a replica of the F Pace produced in 1:43 scale and model collectors eagerly await one of the Chinese based model makers to launch an XF Sport Break in 1:43 scale. Will it be NEO, Matrix, or Premium X all who have all done multiple Jaguars in the past?


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Some preview samples from Corgi and Oxford Diecast

By Maz Woolley

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

John Ayrey is a major UK wholeseller and hosts open days for its trade buyers several times a year. I was lucky enough to get a press invite to their July session featuring Oxford and Corgi models. I even got to walk round their impressive warehouse which was full of models I wish I could afford!

All the models photographed are pre-production prototypes and may feature combinations of fittings which will not all appear in the same combination on the released models. Some of the models shown are just becoming available whilst others will ship over the rest of 2018.

We were lucky enough to have Lyndon Davies (Taff) at the event. It was fascinating to find out more about the development of Oxford’s models and how a lot of effort has to be expended at the CAD phase to make sure the engineers in China understand the need for certain body features to be created in a particular way to facilitate printing later.

Oxford are finalising models for two years ahead and if I interpreted Taff correctly we will begin to see the results of all the work going on at Hornby soon too.

Lyndon Davies (Taff) CEO/Chairman Hornby Hobbies, and Director at, and founder of, Oxford Diecast

N Gauge 1:148 scale

 

Oxford showed a small number of models at this scale. All the models shown are due in Q3/2018.

NMA002 Mercedes Ambulance London

NLR002 Land Rover LIghtweight Military Police

NCOR3003 Cortina Mark III Sebring Red

HO Gauge 1:87 scale

Samples were shown of the forthcoming new releases in the range of small US cars. The first two are recolours due soon.

87CI61003 1961 Chevrolet Impala White/Roman Red Q3/2018

87CSD61002 1961 Cadillac Sedan DeVille Aspen Gold Metallic

Test castings of new models were also shown

1961 Chrysler 300 Convertible (Closed)  – no production date for this version yet

87CC61001 Chrysler 300 Convertible (Open)  Mardi Gras Red Q3/2018

87DC68001 Dodge Charger Bright Red Q3/2018

87DD69001 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona black Q3/2018

87DS46001 DeSoto Suburban Noel Green Q3/2018 – NB Catalogue does not show luggage fitted.

De Soto Taxi not shown in catalogue yet.

87DP57001 1957 Dodge D100 Sweptside Pick up Tropical Coral/Glacier White Q3/2018

OO Gauge 1:76 Scale

 

76TCAB010 Scania T Cab short Curtainside Stuart Nichol Transport Q3/2018

76DAF004 DAF 85 Short Fridge Trailer Trevor Pye Q3/2018

76TPU002 Ford Transit Dropside Network Rail Q3/2018

76BR001 Burrell 8nhp DCC showman’s Locomotive and Caravan The Masterpiece (Dorset) Q3/2018

76JCX001 JCB 3CX Q3/2018

Combine Harvester – not shown in latest catalogue

763CX002 JCB 3CX Eco Backhoe Loader Union Jack Livery Q3/2018

76P38002 Range Rover P38 Monte Carlo Blue Q3/2018

76TR6002 Triumph TR6 Signal Red Q3/2018

76JSS006 SS Jaguar DArk Blue Q3/2018

76MGBGT003 MGB GT Glacier White Q3/2018

76CAP008 Ford Capri Signal Orange Q3/2018

76SOM001 Austin Somerset Black Q3/2018

76SOM002 Austin Somerset Buckingham Green Q4/2018

76BMO02003 BMW 2002 Taiga Green Q3/2018

76VW Could possibly be the pastel blue but very different shade to catalogue.

76FCC001 Ford Consul Capri Lime Green/Ermine White Q3/2018

76FDE010 Ford 400E Cargo Grey Q3/2018

76FT1008 Ford Transit Mark I Castrol Q3/2018

76RCL002 Range Rover Classic Darien Gap Q3/2018

Another sample I could not find in the catalogue of one of the later defenders with roof rack etc.

76LR2S004 Land Rover Short Wheelbase Post Office Telephones (Yellow) Q3/208

Land Rover not shown in Catalogue.

76LR2S005 Land Rover Series II SWB Civil Defense. NB Catalogue does not show luggage fitting on roof.

76LR3002 Land Rover Series III Hard Top AA Q3/2018

76LRFCS001 Land Rover FC Signals NATO Q3/2018

76CHT004 Churchill Tank 6th Guards Brigade 1943 Q4/2018

76TIL011 Austin Tilly No.1 MTTC Camberley 1945 (Subaltern Princess Elizabeth) Q3/2018

76WFA007 Weymann Fanfare North Western Q3/2018

76SB002 Saro Bus Maidstone and District

76PAN007 Plaxton Panorama Ribble Q3/2018

76IR6004 Irizar i6 Galleon Travel Q3/2018. Foreground is 1:148 Actros truck which I cannot find in the catalogue.

1:72 Scale Aircraft

72DV005 DH104 Devon WB534 RAF Transport Command

AC083 Henschel 123A Unit 3/SFGr 50 Lt. Hamann Q3/2018

1:43 Scale

 

43TX5001 LEVC TX Electric Taxi Black. Q3/2018

43LR3S002 Land Rover Series III SWB Hardtop AA Q3/2018

43R25002 Rolls Royce 25/30 Thrupp and Maberley Q3/2018

1:18 Scale

 

18MBC006 Messerschmitt KR200 Convertible Q3/2018

18HE003 Heinkel Kabine Yellow Q3/2018

Corgi Vanguards

Fewer samples to show here unsurprisingly. But we do get to see the two Minis to come this year.

 

VA13507 Mini 1275GT Special Tuning Press Launch Car

VA02541 Austin Mini Cooper S MK 1 1275cc Almond Green


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Hachette Italy World Buses Part 16

By Fabrizio Panico

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

Nos. 46  to 48

This time we visit fabulous India with a Tata bus, France again with another Berliet and step behind the Iron Curtain with a postwar Skoda. All of them are from the Italian Hachette partwork ‘Autobus dal mondo’, a collection of sixty 1:43 scale bus models, very similar to the French partwork ‘Autobus et autocars du monde’, produced in Bangladesh by Ixo. At the time of writing Italian Hachette has announced that the partwork will be extended to eighty models (the French one is marching towards 120), but the first two models (nos. 61 and 62) are nothing more than new liveries on old castings: not a good start, let’s hope we see something new.

No. 46 (no. 45 in the French collection) Tata LPO 1512 1990 – The origins of Tata can be traced to a company founded in 1868 by Jamshedji Tata : today Tata Group is an Indian multinational conglomerate holding company, headquartered in Mumbai (formerly known as Bombay), and owned by Tata Sons, a registered charity. One of its members is Tata Motors Limited (formerly TELCO, short for Tata Engineering and Locomotive Company) a multinational automotive manufacturing company producing passenger cars, trucks, vans, coaches, buses, sports cars, construction equipment and military vehicles,. The group includes Jaguar Land Rover, with manufacturing and assembly plants in India, as well as in Argentina, South Africa, Great Britain and Thailand.

Founded in 1945 to produce locomotives, the company manufactured its first commercial vehicle in 1954 in a collaboration with Daimler-Benz AG (which ended in 1969): the chassis was a copy of the Mercedes L 3500, and from it was derived a whole series of bus and truck chassis, like the Tata 1210 and then the 1510, and its more modern variant the 1512. The Tata 1510/1512 was the largest selling bus in India and neighbouring countries, combining good features and low ownership cost. Built on a sturdy frame with parallel side members, suited to the difficult local conditions, and equipped from 1993 with a Cummins straight six diesel engine (previously with a Tata-Mercedes Benz 697 engine), the 1512 was usually bodied by contracted suppliers to customer requirements. Alas in later years its reliability was often hindered by poor maintenance causing frequent accidents, notwithstanding a legal maximum speed of 40 km/h.

The scale model represents a 1990 large capacity long distance bus where, lacking any air conditioning, the side doors (obviously on the left side) have been deleted, at the expense of safety. There is the usual combination of a plastic body and a metal baseplate, which is well detailed. It is painted in a bright livery in white, yellow and light green. On the sides there is the “Stage Carriage” writing, meaning it is a vehicle stopping at designated places, plus others printed in Indian characters, which the Author cannot decipher. The registration plate is one from the Delhi Regional Transport Office, correctly printed in black over yellow, as required for a public use. The prefix DL-1P is specifically allocated to Delhi commercial buses.

The angular shape of the bus is well reproduced, with large windows and many separate plastic parts, like lights, bumpers, mirrors and wipers, plus a chromed side exhaust. Very nice wheels and driver’s ‘cab’ area. The seats are only basic. Note the shadows on the windows representing the safety bars on their lower side. No apparent differences to the French edition. A nice model of an almost unknown bus, at least in Europe.


 

No. 47 (no. 36 in the French collection) Berliet PLR 10 1955 – We have already seen the Berliet history and its Crusair (see part 8, no. 22), PHL 10 (see part 10, no. 30) and PR100 ranges (Jelcz version, see part 14, no. 40) and how after the Second World War only commercial vehicle production was resumed, but that Chausson, Isobloc and Renault buses were much more innovative. In 1951 Berliet launched the PLR 8, a very powerful bus, but old fashioned even before it was launched: its heavy welded box frame, its dual rear wheels and horizontal engine meant high costs, both to buy, to use and to maintain. The PLR 8, an urban bus, was equipped with a 125 CV five cylinders MDUH diesel engine, while the PLR 10, an intercity bus, had a 150 CV six cylinders MDZH diesel, later used also on the urban version of the PLR 10. In 1958 a new generation of very low consumption engines was developed thanks to the MAN injection system, but this evolution did not save the model from its fate, as it was not the commercial success the new engine deserved.

With the cooperation of Vétra for the electric systems, Berliet produced a trolleybus version of the PLR 10, named ELR, a variant appreciated in Nice and Marseille.

The scale model represents an urban version (the correct name should be PLR 10 U) of the Monegasque CAM (Compagnie des Autobus de Monaco) with only 20 seated places and large central and rear platform for 70 standing places. The model is in a very elegant white livery with the coat of arms of the Principality on the roof. There is the usual plastic body with metal baseplate, and the exhaust is enhanced in silver.

The red circle on the front means that the vehicle runs a regular service, but it is in contrast with the “Special” in the destination board. The registration plate is not correct for the year, it should be white on blue, the blue on white was released only from 1978. Very likely it is a copy of a preserved and re-registered bus.

A nice front grille is provided, suitably pierced, and good wheels. A well reproduced driver’s cockpit is present as well as a basic interior. Usual added parts like lights, bumpers, mirrors and wipers are fitted. No apparent differences to the French edition. A good choice, fifties buses are the most loved.


 

No. 48 (no. 37 in the French collection) Skoda 706 RO 1947 – In 1859, Count Wallenstein-Vartenberk, owner of an already established foundry and engineering work, set up a branch in Pilsen, then in the Kingdom of Bohemia, part of the Austrian Empire. In 1869, the plant was taken over by Emil Škoda, who soon expanded the firm, and in the 1880s founded what was then a very modern steelwork, which was a leader in arms manufacturing. Exports included heavy castings, such as parts for the Niagara Falls power plant and for the Suez Canal sluices. In 1924, Škoda Works acquired the Laurin-Klement car manufacturer, later known as Škoda Auto.

The companies were separated after 1945, when the whole Czechoslovak economy came under government control : the car works in Mladá Boleslav became AZNP (Automobilové závody národní podnik or National Automobile Manufacturing Industry) today’s Škoda Auto, while the truck plant became part of a conglomerate of nine truck producers headquartered in Liberec as LIAZ (Liberecké automobilové závody), although the trucks and buses were still marketed as Škodas. Later, Škoda became well known in the USSR and other countries as a trolleybus manufacturer, but when in late 1989 the company was privatised very soon mismanagement, and the loss of guaranteed access to the East-European market, led to a collapse. In 1991 the Czech government sought a foreign partner for the passenger car works, choosing Volkswagen with a 30% initial stake, rising to 100% ownership by 1999.

The Škoda 706 RO is an urban bus produced from 1947 on the frame of the 706 R truck, and bodied by Sodomka (from 1948 named Karosa). In 1896 Josef Sodomka founded a manufacturing plant for coaches, and producing automobile bodywork of its own design from 1925, designed to be mounted on automobile chassis produced by Praga. In 1948, the company was nationalised and incorporated into a ‘National Enterprise’, which was then given the name Karosa (acronym for “Factory for carriages, cars, rotors, machine tools, cutting machines and buses”). Karosa become the sole manufacturer of buses in Czechoslovakia, but in 1989, after the fall of the communist regime, Karosa had to reduce its production. Help came from Renault, Karosa later becoming part of Irisbus and then of Iveco Bus. At the time the RO was a modern high capacity bus and was exported to many countries within the communist block, China included. The engine, a Skoda straight six diesel engine with 145 CV, was placed in front next to driver, and the rear axle was propelled by a long driveshaft. The body presented a very long rear overhang. Its heir, the RTO (quite similar, but much more comfortable with a lowered frame), was presented in 1958 and continued serial production until 1972, while it was produced under licence until 1977 by Jelcz (see part 14, no. 40) in Poland.

The scale model represents quite accurately a bus exported to China, with a red and white livery, and a dark grey roof. The Author apologises but he is unable to translate the Chinese characters. At the time China encouraged the workforce to live close to work to limit need for transport to work. Nowadays their cities are blocked by traffic like ours, and worse.

The bus has the usual form of construction with a plastic body and metal baseplate, which is well detailed. A side exhaust is added, as are front and rear tow hooks. Very nice doors and the wheels are fitted. Among the added plastic parts are the usual lights, bumpers, mirrors (five of them) and wipers. On the roof a triangle is fitted, very likely to be used to indicate the presence of a trailer. Another nice reproduction of a bus almost unknown in Western Europe.


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