All posts by Karl Schnelle

1/43 diecast collector

Model Auto Review 1989 – Part Two

By Karl Schnelle

The second half of 1989 saw three issues,  39 – 41, published.   Continuing the same format as before, Rod Ward used different cover designs featuring various cars and trucks.  All three back covers were ads for Modelauto Wholesale Supply, Rod and Val’s company back then in Leeds.

If you see any interesting articles in the Contents (or photos) from any of these articles, please let us know and we will re-publish them in MAR Online.

No 39 Extra 89 August/September

The Extra summer issue had a blue theme for the cover with 1:43 resin and handbuilts from France, Switzerland, and UK.  The Krupp truck is actually a 1:87 Brekina.

The Contents reflect the same Editorial decisions as previous issues:  a mix of articles on cars and trucks, mostly 1/43.    Being a Tekno Denmark collector from way back when,  Clive Chick’s article on Made in Denmark piqued my curiosity.   On a personal note,  I met him many years later at the Chicago Toy Show.    I recognized his name from MAR 30 years later!  Of course, the best article of 1989 (and perhaps of all time) was on p. 1790.  Seriously,  Rod was nice enough to publish my Marklin RAK article and even added his own footnote.

The inside color cover shows 1:50 scale construction and fire equipment.  Some 1:87 plastic buses are at the bottom. [Click on the photo to read the Contents more easily using the larger image.]

The back cover has an international mix available in the UK in 1989 from Argentina, Brazil, France, Japan, and Spain!

No 40 Autumn 89 October/November

The Autumn cover had an appropriate brown theme with cars and trucks (kits and handbuilts) again.  A MAR tradition started with the very 1st Competition – what is the brown motor car on the cover?  (answer below).

The inside cover had mostly buses this time in various scales.  Contents were similar to the previous issue.  Clive Chick continued his Denmark series;  four other continuing series were published as well.

The back cover has some nice 1/43 diecast Collectors Classics shown from Argentina.

No 41 Christmas 89 December/January

The final issue of the year has a red and green theme, naturally.   The vintage Santas were made from old Barclay molds!   As an Alfa Romeo collector, I should have picked up one of the Milestone Models Disco Volantes (black or red), but they were over my price range.

The Editorial was moved for this issue to the next page.  Rod had a lot to say about the MAR Competition, missing parts, and the economic downturn.  The brown car from #40 was a 1917 Chalmers Seven from The Saturday Evening Post.

For the Christmas issue, it was nice to see photos of Rod and Val and all their staff on the back cover.  I think those are the only photos I have ever seen of them.

I hope you enjoy this nostalgic peak at the hardcopy MARs.  We will continue to review them as time goes on:  we have 100’s to go!


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Dinky Toys Triporteur

By Terry Hardgrave

Both the French and English Dinky Toys factories make a huge variety of models right before and after WWII.  Many of these were somewhat unusual. This is an example… this is neither a car nor a motorcycle, but a unique little vehicle called a Triporteur.

These were quite popular in France before the war, for use in the cities, for small delivery items. First made by the French Meccano factory in the late 1930’s, then made after the war until 1952.

The hinged lid is often missing, as it is held in place by a very thin metal pin.  This view below shows the hinged storage lid.

This Dinky was made in France from 1935-52 in a variety of colors and is numbered 14.


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Togi History – Part VIII

by Karl Schnelle and Koen Beekmann

In Part VII of this series, we looked at the  Alfa Romeo Duetto Spider and Kamm-tail Spider.    Now, we will examine two Togi show cars from the early 1970s.

In a recent article, the American magazine Autoweek said these ’70s concept cars were all about “decadence and design”.   We believe it and these two Togi’s prove it.  The Carabo was introduced by Togi in 1970 and the Montreal in 1971,  (Photos by the authors, unless otherwise noted.)

Carabo

In 1968,  Bertone presented their design concept at the Turin auto show, the Carabo, which was based on the Alfa Romeo 33 race car,  Several other automobile design firms also showed studies there based on this racing car. The Carabo was designed by Marcello Gandini, who was employed at Bertone at the time, and was the first car with upward hinged, or scissor, doors.  We know them now mainly because of the Lamborghini Countach; that is no coincidence because Gandini designed that car also.

The name Carabo was based on the name for a bright green beetle that inspired Bertone’s use of the iridescent color for the car.  The color and wedge design was at that time very progressive and seemed to come from another planet.  The car was also equipped with reflective safety glass with a golden mirror surface.

The actual car is now at the Museo  Storico Alfa Romeo in Arese.  The first author was very excited to see it a few weeks ago!

This concept car inspired many model car brands to bring out their own versions:  just think of Dinky Toys, Mercury, Politoys, Solido, Verem, Matchbox, Hotwheels, and later Spark (and there are even more out there).  Togi also got into the mix with their 1/23 version, probably the most expensive Carabo model back in the early 1970s.  However, the Togi was probably not the best scale model,  due to its poor proportions and very simple design.  Even other Togis had better proportions and details at that time.  Many other Carabo toy models from that time look better in scale: for example, the 1/43 Solido or the 1/25 Politoys.

As with most Togis, there was a kit and a factory built version, shown in this old catalog page.

On this model, everything can be opened: the doors hinge upwards, the rear trunk opens, and the flip-up headlights are opened with an ingenious mechanism that works by pushing the steering wheel towards the dashboard. Unfortunately, the Togi uses ordinary flip-up headlights while the real Carabo had 3 slats that rotated up.

The instruction for opening the headlights is stamped on the box insert.

There seems to be two versions of the wheel design on the older models; we are not sure which came first.   One version has flat wheels,  the same wheels that later came on the 2000 Berlina and the Giulia GTA.  The two versions are evident on the black-green car with flat wheels in the front right and the gray-green car with hollow (recessed) ’33 style wheels’ behind on the left  (photo Benjan Spiele).

It seems pretty remarkable that Togi decided to completely change the wheel design, unless it was a cost cutting measure.  The hollow wheels are much closer to those of the original than the flat wheels.  But the hollow version has other differences: the color of the rear is brighter  (closer to the real one, so that’s a good adjustment) and the black plastic pieces have been replaced by dark gray, while the actual concept car is  black.    So better wheels but less realistic color choice – why?

The different colors and wheels are clearly visible in the photo below. The gray version has no side windows.  This is not an error on this one copy because it is seen often like this. (photo Benjan Spiele)

Below is an old Togi flyer, with the Carabo shown with a complete cardboard kit box. That cardboard box dates this flyer because in the early seventies they replaced it with a plastic inner box.  Frustratingly, we can’t see which wheels are on the model and so the mystery remains: which wheel came first.

The Carabo has not always been in Togi’s range if we believe the catalogs.  After 1995 and the takeover by FongalTogi, this model came back again, but with a big difference: the headlights can no longer be opened and closed. They are cast with the bodywork. It is unclear whether this adjustment had been carried out before 1995, or only afterwards. Togi catalogs can lead you down the wrong track and are often of no help, because they sometimes re-use very old photos.

The newest version with molded in headlights and side windows is shown below. . It is cast in zamac and quite heavy, like all the recent Togis. The older versions are made of light alloy, probably aluminium.  These hollow wheels have larger wheel nuts here and are darker in color, which makes them look different.

Here is a close-up of the newest wheel design, with the real one below it.

Also, there is less red on the rear of this latest  Togi version! Compare to the full size rear below!

An interesting side-note is that an American toy car magazine published an article on the Carabo kit shortly after it came out.  Car Model in December 1971 reviewed the Carabo kit and factory-built Giulia GT. At that time in the US, Togi were not imported so the reviewer relied on a friend to carry them back from Italy.

Montreal

A year before the introduction of the one-off Carabo, Gandini also penned the Montreal for Expo 67 in Montreal, Canada.   The concept car was updated and upgraded and introduced as a low volume production car in 1970.  Alfa produced the chassis and mechanicals and then sent it to Bertone for the bodies.   The white one below is the prototype in the Museo – notice that it has 7 slots behind the door.  Production versions had 6!

Less than 4000 were made before being discontinued in 1977.  The two below were seen by the first author in Italy this summer, the orange in the Museo and the red in a private collection!

The authors have not researched the Togi Montreal in depth so we are unsure if there are multiple versions or variations.

The original Togi is made of light alloy and always in orange, and the newer FongalTogi is made of heavier zamac in several colors. Also the newer one is recognizable by its nickle colored wheel nuts instead of chrome ones.  Both doors and the hood open on this one!

This post-1997 example came in a plain white box with this sticker on top.

Please let us know if you have any other Togi versions of these two  supercars!  So now this series of Togi articles is well into the 1970s.  Thus, in Part iX, we will look at all their 2000 Berlina variations!


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Best of Show Opel Senator

By Frank Koh

It’s a good thing the Opel Senator never reached American shores. It might have suffered the same fate as the Yugo. What a pity. It was a really, really awesome car, but it was a shame that this car suffered from endless mechanical and electrical problems. This Best of Show (BoS) 1/18 scale resin model of the Opel Senator A2 is a subtle reminder that once upon a time, Opel built luxury grand touring cars.

World-class engineering, yes. However, the Senator was plagued with incurable mechanical and electrical maladies. When Germany embarked on its own version of “Cash for Clunkers”, the Senator was one of the most popular vehicles that met their inglorious end at the jaws of the crusher.

When Adam Opel AG released the Opel Senator in 1978, automotive journalists gave it five-star ratings for grand touring performance, handling, comfort and refinement. The Senator directly competed with the Mercedes-Benz S-Class and the BMW 7-Series in the European full-size luxury car market. Like its rivals, the Senator was fast, roomy and opulent. But unlike the flagships from Stuttgart and Munich, the Senator did not grow old gracefully.

In fact, the Senator literally fell to pieces just a decade after it took the grand touring/luxury car market by storm. Furthermore, the car was a depreciation disaster of the highest order. Today, hardly any Opel Senators can be found anywhere in the world, outside of the Opel Museum and the private garages of  Opel enthusiasts.

It is quite surprising that Best of Show (BoS) was able to find an actual car to use as a template for this exquisite 1/18 scale resin model of the 1983-86 Senator A2 sedan. The A2 designation is the unofficial term for the facelift of the first version.  What a waste though. The A2 was really a nice car. The Senator could have been a landmark vehicle for GM Opel  It wouldn’t be shocking to assume that the BoS resin model of the Opel Senator will probably outlive the real car.

Even though the Australian Holden Commodore//Caprice were developed from the German Opel Rekord/Commodore/Senator platform, the Holdens have become cult cars, revered by enthusiasts for their sparkling performance and outright durability. Truth be told, that was one instance when the Australians beat the Germans at their own game.

Now that GM has sold off Opel and they are part of PSA, it would be great if they did return to the US with some landmark cars.  We will see!


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Trip Report – 1/43 and Others in Italy, Part II

By Karl Schnelle

Continuing my car journey across northern Italy started in Part I

After being inundated with Ferraris in Modena and Maranello, we moved out into the Italian countryside. The Maserati museum collection was sold in the 1990s when they went through a restructuring, but a private collector saved it with the help of the local government.  It is open to the public at his dairy farm.  Cows and cars – what a combination!  A side benefit is that you can also taste and buy their cheese!   Inside the museum, I could not get close enough to his 1/43 display cabinet, but he had a few Masers in there!

The original highlight of this trip, the reason I signed up, was a visit to the Museo Storico Alfa Romeo.   Ever since I had my 1976 Alfetta, I have wanted to visit.  Then in 2011, it closed down and I was bummed out.  Re-opened in 2015, it was back on my bucket list!

A funny story – I walked over to the Carabinieri in the Subaru and asked if they had any Alfas in their fleet.  One of the four said they have one in Milano, but he never got to drive it!  I guess they were parked there in the back to be on call if needed.  It was a big day at the museum because the 400 classic cars of the Mille Miglia were passing by out front!

After the overload at the museum, we headed to Lake Como for a little non-car downtime. That meant time for me to search out any model shops.  Just 5 minutes from the hotel was this jam-packed store.   Previously, the one in Bologna was already closed, the one in Maranello was at 3-hour lunch, and the two in Milano were closed on Sunday like every store, so I was happy to get to at least one store during business hours.  Many 1/43 Alfas were examined, but none that I needed…  Prices were about the same as the internet in the US, but it’s always nice to see them in-person and up-close.

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Up next was the second private collection:  really amazing ‘Pebble Beach’ quality Alfas and Lancias in a nondescript warehouse outside Milan.

For some reason, the owner had a case of 1/43 Gulp handbuilt Alfas there.  Perhaps, they are there because they made his rare Alfa Romeo 6C1750 Carrozzeria Aprile!

By happy coincidence, the private Vespa museum was nearby and the owner was around to open it up for us.  It pays to have a tour guide who speaks Italian. Of course, he had the requisite partworks in his display cabinets.  There must have been 100s of full scale mopeds on display above his Vespa parts business.

Next day, it was off to Turin to stay at the ex-Fiat factory at Lingotto.  Their 1923 test track is still on the roof!  Did you happen to see the original Italian Job?

A short walk from factory is perhaps the best automobile museum in Europe, the Museo Nazionale dell’Automobile.  Redesigned in 2011, it is a fun place for any car guy or girl to visit.  But why do they have a boxed Dinky Toy BMW Isetta;  Dinky never made one!  I think they previously had ‘Dinky’ 24L Vespa 400 in there that must be out on a temporary exhibit somewhere!

The other 1/43 mystery was why they had a large Brooklin Model display.  After further investigation, the new silent partner (or owner) at Brooklin is Nicola Bulgari, and two of his newly-restored American cars are on display in this Turin museum now!

Another fun display is the new Fiat 500 covered with >500 500s!  I think they are 1/55 Majorettes…

And finally because our esteemed Editor has been writing a lot about Atlas and DeAgostini lately, we zipped by this place on the A4 Autostrada on the way back to Malpensa airport to end our long, glorious trip.

I hope that these two posts has not been too much for you.  However, if you would like more details or photos from anywhere we visited, please let me know via the contact info below. Arrivederci!


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Trip Report – 1/43 and Others in Italy, Part I

By Karl Schnelle

I have been home from Italy a couple weeks now and just got my 500 car photos organized.   It was a trip of a lifetime, I have said several times!  The Alfa Romeo Owners Club (USA) had organized a tour of Italy, and I happened to see their ad.  I immediately signed up and then asked my wife.  Not as bad a mistake as you may think, as she happily added on four extra days (with absolutely no car activities)!

The plan was to see the Alfa Romeo Museum (naturally), the Ferrari museum, the private Maserati museum, Lamborghini factory, Ducati factory, and 2 private collections.   In hindsight now, I don’t know which was more amazing.  Perhaps that we timed it just right to be at the start of the Mille Miglia was the highlight!  [Click to enlarge the photos,]

I did hunt out some model car stores and looked for any 1/43 Alfas to add to my collection, but that was really low priority compared to all the other sights to see!  What follows then is a photo travelogue of some of my model car sightings over the ten-day trip.

We started our tour with two factory tours near Bologna (‘no photos please’); both Ducati and Lamborghini had museums attached to their factories.  The Ducati gift shop had lots of nice motorcycle models for sale, but I am more of a car guy. Lambo strangely had no gift shop or models for sale.

Next stop was a private collection at a farm out in the countryside, truly amazing pre and post-war cars. mostly Italian.

We had time for an extra stop in Modena at the Museo Casa Enzo Ferrari.  They had a nice 1/43 display of Enzo’s first workshop – when he worked for/on Alfa Romeos!  Is that a Brumm Bugatti out front???

In the display cases were two vintage, large scale models: a Ferrari liquor container and a Maserati wind tunnel model.

The next day we were off to Brescia for the start of the Mille Miglia.  While we were there, we also saw the Mille museum.  They had a few 1/43s for sale, but had 2 full cases of 1/43 Mille cars inside the museum: handbuilts on wooden bases as well as the Italian Hachette Mille partworks series!

Later we also went to the Ferrari museum in Maranello near the current factory.  A recreation of Enzo’s office had a few 1/43s on his cadenza.

My favorite full scale might have been this gorgeous 250 Europa.

In the F1 room, they had a whole wall of 1/43 Ferrraris.  Here is the middle section.

Their gift shop was stocked with high end, handbuilt 1/43s. At that price, they could be BBR, MR, or Looksmart, or even better!

Of course, just go across the street to an independent store if you want more reasonable prices for the same cars!

I’ll take a break now and post Part II later.  Hopefully this has not been too many photos all at once.   If you would like more details or photos from anywhere we visited, please let me know via the contact info below.  Ciao…


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Two 1950’s Cadillacs in Photos

By  Mike DeTorrice

1955 Cadillac Fleetwood Series 60

This is the 1955 Cadillac Fleetwood Series 60 sedan, as done by Greenlight, in the 1/43 “Elvis” series of vehicles.  All snaps are taken in the suburbs of Chicago.

It’s really well done and certainly is a bargain at generally less than US$20.

This is the blue version, and a pink one is available as well.

1957 Cadillac Eldorado

This is a beautiful 1/43 Solido ’57 Cadillac that I got a great deal on at the Countryside show.  The snaps of the ’57 start in the suburbs of Chicago again, but after a long road trip, we ended up in San Diego!

These were made in both Seville and Biarritz forms.


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Dinky Supertoys Guy Vans

By  Terry Hardgrave

All photographs copyright by the author.

In 1949, Meccano introduced the first Dinky Supertoys Guy van, in the famous “Slumberland” livery. This was a most attractive model, finished in bright red paint, and featuring exquisite decals, in gold with black border, showing the company name as well as the Royal Crest of King George VI. Many think this is the most attractive of the 6 Guy vans made over a period of several years. This was in production from 1949 through 1951.

The second issue in the series was the “Lyons Swiss Roll”, made for only one year, 1952, so now quite rare and hard to find. Finished in a beautiful violet/dark blue, with more wonderful multi-colored decals, it makes a handsome model.

In 1953, Meccano released the third version of the Dinky Supertoys Guy Van, in the iconic “Weetabix” livery. Very rare and expensive! Mint, boxed examples can run over US$3000. For many serious, diehard Dinky collectors, this is the Holy Grail. After searching for several years, I settled for this one in very good condition, not quite up to my usual collecting standards.

The fourth van was in the “Spratt’s” livery and was one of more common, best remembered of this famous series, made from 1954 through about 1956.

Around 1956, the Guy Van in “Ever Ready” livery made its first appearance and was the fifth model in this series. As Ever Ready batteries were sold everywhere, this model got wide recognition.

Of the six Dinky Supertoys Guy Vans that were produced, maybe the most striking was the Robertson “Golden Shred”, also the last in the series.  If you want to know the history of the ‘Golly’ doll on the side of the van, see wiki or here.

All the Guy Vans were very popular, beloved models, made for several years in the 1950’s.  Many think that they and the Foden’s represent the best commercial models made by Meccano in that Golden Era of 1946-1960.


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Countryside Weekend in Review!

By Randy Rusk

Editor’s Note:  Every March in the suburbs of Chicago, USA, a group of 1/43 collectors come together to meet face-to-face.  After all year reading MAR Online and interacting on various virtual groups like Forum 43, it’s very nice to meet in-person, socialize, buy and swap, and ‘talk toys’.  The guys (it’s all guys unfortunately) come from all over the US, Canada, and occasionally even the UK.   The weekend is very full with Friday dinner for early-birds,  BuzFest on Saturday, and Chicago deep-dish pizza that night.  Sunday morning is the Countryside Classic Toy Show where many of the 1/43 guys have tables.  Then we all head back home with our various purchases!


Here are my impressions from the Countryside weekend for those who weren’t able to make it.  After checking into the venerable Holiday Inn, I ventured off to BuzFest. Buz’ gracious “hostess with the mostest!” wife had a great spread of sandwiches, snacks and desserts out – but I was saving myself for the deep dish pizza that was to come. More on that in a minute.

There was already a solid group of guys in the room when I got there, full of tales about models they recently acquired – or were about to:

But what stopped me in my tracks – and had me immediately reaching for my wallet – was the surprise arrival of a new Conquest woody, the 1959 Mercury Colony Park Station Wagon in red, black or white (with or without roof rack):

These came in just a day earlier from overseas so the timing was perfect. I nabbed the red one.  Several others snapped them up as well.  Regardless of the model that weakened your knees, Buz was very happy to get us into that next new car:

With stories shared and money spent, it was off to Giordano’s for Chicago-style deep dish pizza. A big thanks to Frank for once again coordinating a good meeting space with hot pizza at a great price.

And while you might look at these pics and wonder why no one is smiling, it’s because they all took their pizza consumption very seriously! With lighter wallets and full bellies, it was time to retire to the hotel for a fresh start in the morning.

Sunday was bright and sunny and felt like it was at least 20 deg F warmer – a very good sign. Another good sign was the long line waiting to get into the toy show.

Now, normally I’m not a big fan of crowds, but for the future of our hobby, it was really nice to see a big turnout of avid collectors pouring over the tables.

Word on the street is that they were all lining up to see John’s latest pink and green masterpiece in model making excellence:

OK, well, maybe not so much, but it was great to see all the dealers who support our hobby out in force with lots of great stuff to buy.  You might spot Automodello in the collage below.

Finally, at the Forum table, our thanks to Esval for sending several boxes of models, as well as to Sergio for a sneak peek of prototype samples of some of his latest offerings from Goldvarg. That newest woody (top left) is a must-have for me:

Well, all in all, it was a great time to catch up with old friends and new models. I always think of this show as the first sign of spring… and with the mix of scale models viewed (and purchased) over the two days, I can’t wait to see what the rest of 2018 holds!

I hope everyone made it home safely and I look forward to seeing you all again next year. A shout out to Dick Browne, our fearless leader at Forum 43.  I hope all is well and that we’ll see you all back in Chicago in 2019.


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A Polistil Volvo 164E from JFK

by Frank Koh

Here’s a very special Polistil Volvo 164E 1/25 scale model from my teenage years. It was acquired at, of all places, a hobby shop in the John F. Kennedy International Airport. It proved to be a foreboding of great things to come: my undying love for Volvo automobiles.

The Acquisition

In the sixties and seventies,  many of the more prominent international airport departure terminals had hobby shops that carried some of the best models in the market. On a trip with my family from New York to Manila in 1976, I found this 1/25 scale Volvo in the hobby shop (yes!) at the Northwest Airlines departure area of JFK International Airport.  It was “Love At First Sight”, and thankfully my grandfather gladly bought it for me. I fondly remember how careful I was to avoid damaging it, considering I had to forcibly stuff it into my already overloaded (with countless other model cars!) carry-on baggage.

Then when I wasn’t busy stuffing my face with airline food, I would peek into my travel bag and admire the Volvo for the duration of the very long flight. For a mid seventies model car, it was packed with so many innovative features. The trunk and hood opened, and so did ALL FOUR DOORS! The detail and realism of the Polistil Volvo were exceptional. An accurate miniature rendition of the Volvo inline six, the “battering ram” impact-absorbing bumpers, the detailed undercarriage, windshield wipers that were separate pieces and those crisply-molded steel-belted radial tires mounted on life-like steel rims with authentic Volvo hubcaps!

The Model

Polistil  made this model in Italy in the 1970’s and did a great job overall.  However, durability and safety considerations plus manufacturing constraints of that time dictated that the door window frames on the Polistil Volvo 164E be a tad thicker than they should, but this was a small price to pay for achieving an accurate opening door which included the window frame, just like on the real car. Well, those nicely cast road wheels with Volvo hubcaps more than made up for that minor concession.

While this  Polistil Volvo of the mid seventies was not the first diecast model car that featured four opening doors, it was one of the few, if not the first of its kind in this large scale where the rear doors could be opened while the front doors remained closed. Other such models which had four opening doors required that the front doors be opened before the rear ones could likewise be opened. This brilliance of engineering made it easier for the “imaginary miniature rear seat passenger” to board the car and alight from it without the “assistance” of the driver or front passenger!

Everything opened on the 164E. What is not seen in the pictures is that the front seats actually recline, just like on the real car. When this model was released in the mid seventies, the flagship Volvo 164 series was about to be replaced as the top model in the line by the Volvo 264 sedan and 265 station wagon that was powered by a 2.7 liter V6 engine shared by Volvo, Peugeot and Renault. This Polistil model of the 164E therefore features what could probably be the last miniature replica of the 164 series 3.0 liter inline six engine, the exclusive product of Volvo engineering and design.

The all-diecast metal chassis has exceptional details.  And the intricate tread design of those radial tires comes to life in this photo. Another world-beating design feature was the use of ultra-thin, ultra-rigid thin axles that effectively resulted in low-friction “speed wheels”, similar to those used in Hot Wheels and Matchbox Superfast models of the era.

This model was an auspicious introduction to a life-long love affair with the Volvo marque. For that reason, this Italian-made Polistil classic remains one of my favorite Volvo model cars.


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