All posts by Karl Schnelle

1/43 diecast collector

More Police Cars

By Peter Wyatt

In my previous post, I promised to show a few police cars from my collection. Except for one, they are all a nominal 1/43 scale.

The first one is a Corgi Mini van with dog and handler.

Corgi Vanguards Vauxhall Velox

Corgi Vanguards Triumph Dolomite

Dinky Humber Hawk. This car has the number plate of PC 49.

Corgi Zephyr Estate

Mersey Tunnel police Land Rover

Corgi Hillman Imp. As was common on some Corgi models, the rear suspension on this model is broken.

Metosul VW

Dinky Ford Zodiac

Morestone Wolsley police car. This one is the size of a Matchbox toy.

Vanguards Austin 1800 diplomatic protection unit

Corgi Riley Pathfinder

Dinky Range Rover

Corgi Chevrolet. This is my only American police car!

Finally, here is my Dinky police phone box.  I hope you enjoyed these photos.

 


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A Life of Police and Police Cars

By Peter Wyatt

I got this Corgi Toys Commer 464 police van in 1967 for my tenth birthday. The light flashed (still does), and from that day, my heart was set on becoming a police officer.

Having completed an apprenticeship as a mechanical engineer, just in case I didn’t like being a police officer or, they didn’t like me, I became a police officer in England, which I did for thirty years until I retired seven years ago as a Detective Inspector. Thank you, Corgi, for helping me in my career path and for giving my family and me a great quality of life.

It also led me to become an avid collector of police vehicles which I still do to this day at the age of 60. I have also fine tuned my two grandsons, Harry and Noah, into the mindset of collecting die cast and to look after them as an investment. They do have cars to play with, but they love to see the collectible ones on display. I also collect other Corgi and Dinky Toys, but police cars have always been my main collecting theme.

All photos are my own apart from the Mark 2 Escort which is from the Trofeu site. I moved house recently, and all my cars are currently in the loft whilst I have a room converted to house them. I can’t find my own picture of that model.

I became a police officer in 1981. The very first police car I drove was a Ford Escort Mark 2. It went from 0-60 in about 2 hours, but I thought it was a fantastic car. In the early 2000’s, Trofeu brought out this 1/43 limited model of the actual car. I just had to have one!

It’s not my intention to chronicle my whole career, but I will share some of my scale model collection by different manufacturers.

The following is a Volvo V 70 traffic car based on a Schuco Volvo estate. A business called Paul Robson Models based in Cumbria UK personalised the Schuco model into actual Staffordshire police cars.

You will see that Paul placed a clipboard with my name on the dashboard. I never actually served as a traffic officer; twenty four of my thirty years were spent as a detective.

21 is the force code for my old force, Staffordshire Police, and the number is on the roof of cars to enable identification from the air.

In my next post, I will show a selection of images from my collection. Hope you will find some of them interesting.


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Two Favorites in One

By Frank Koh

Playlist for Tonight:
1. Sergio Mendes' Favorite Things, Atlantic Records, 1968.
2. T.N. Nomura Tin Battery-Operated "Bump 'n Go" 1967 Chevrolet Camaro SS, Japan, 1968

For me, this 1968 Sergio Mendes solo album (sans Brazil 66) on the Atlantic Records label (not one of the more well-known A&M releases) is truly The Carefree Sixties on Vinyl. The upbeat title cut “My Favorite Things” and the sultry interpretation of “I Say a Little Prayer” are the best of the early works of Mr. Mendes. Arranged and conducted by Dave Grusin, I might add.

The T.N. Nomura bump-‘n-go tin Camaro is not only exceptionally realistic and well-scaled (close to 1/18) for a sixties tin toy, it is feature-packed as well. It’s got lights that actually work, and though the headlight doors don’t open like on the real car, they are actually “see-thru”, and that’s genuinely sixties-cool. It also has a horn that makes squeaking sounds like those silly toddlers’ shoes that annoy everyone within twenty feet of those little brats that love to wear them.

Why did I create this playlist?

I practically “grew up on a diet of Bossa Nova” and other wonderful types of music, and Sergio Mendes has always been a personal favorite. I have also loved first generation Camaros since they debuted during the 1967 model year. In fact, I have owned two of them.  So the year 1968 ties it all together!

Here’s my latest project car, a full scale 1968 RS/SS tribute car, which coincidentally, we shot in its original Butternut Yellow color.


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Togi History – Part V

by Karl Schnelle and Koen Beekmann

In Part IV of this series, we looked at the Alfa Romeo Giulia Berlina.  Now, we will examine the Alfa Romeo 2600 Sprint.  The Giulia first came out in 1963, and the 2600 Sprint followed in 1964 (Rampini, Automodelli Togi, online Dec 2017).  Others report that the 2600 Sprint may have been introduced as early as 1962. [Unless noted, all photos are by Koen or from his colleagues.]

Short History of the Real Thing
Alfa Romeo introduced the 4-cylinder 2000 Sprint in 1960.  The 2000 coupe was one of the first commercial designs by Giorgetto Giugiaro, then employed at Bertone. This 2000  was succeeded in 1962 by the 6-cylinder 2600.    The most notable exterior difference was the small air intake on the hood (bonnet), no doubt needed for the larger in-line 6-cylinder. This 2600 remained in production until 1968.  Two 2600s are shown below, in Chicago USA, 2008. [Photo: Karl Schnelle]
The Togi
Togi made a very nice model of the 2600 Sprint.  At that time, it was the 6th Togi.   The rear body sides seemed a bit short, but the overall impression was very good.  In any case, the clean, simple design of the toy made it one of the authors’ favorite Togi cars!
As with many previously released Togi’s, nothing opens.  However,   the steering works the front wheels, and there is suspension front and rear.  This was the model that made both authors decide to search out more Togi’s and  start collecting them;  what a wonderful 1960’s era toy automobile. And of course a 6-cylinder Alfa is always nice to have!
The very first release (see two photos above) is recognized by the lack of the chrome strip under the doors, while the second series has the chrome-plated plastic strip clamped and glued between the two halves of the body.  When the chrome strip was added is not known.  See two photos below.

In addition to the regular coupé, there was a Polizia (Squadra Mobile Pantera) and a Vigili del Fuoco (Fire) version. These two came out in 1965, a year after the plain version (Rampini).  As with other toy brands, these designs were created simply by adding decals, a flashing light, and an antenna.

The 1967 catalog (below) shows the two emergency versions with the lower side strip , as shown by the snippet below, so the older version without the strip only lasted a few years.

The Polizia  and Fire versions are much more rare than the civilian one, the Fire version is almost never seen.  Probable reason: These versions were just less popular and therefore did not sell as well.

Besides the ready-made models, Togi kits were also sold. As with all Togi kits, the owner could screw the parts together with the supplied screwdriver, and they are set!

Are the later Togi’s with many open parts “a  pain” to put together? (Yes, you actually need 4 small hands all at the same time!)  Even with no opening parts, the 2600 was one of the first Togi’s with a realistic, but simple, interior that consisted of two separate front seats, a back seat,  a rear shelf, and steering wheel. The plastic interior parts were always painted.

Details about the Police Version

Many of the 1960’s Alfas in Polizia guise for the Mobile Squadron had a ‘pantera’, a panther, in the front wings.

The early Togi versions without chrome side strips had the panther printed in one direction only, so the driver-side was facing backwards!  See the photo below.

The newer chrome strip versions had the panther facing the correct way! See photo below.

Next time in Part VI, we will continue the Togi story with the Alfa Romeo 2-door Giulia GT series.


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Togi History – Part IV

by Karl Schnelle and Koen Beekmann

In Part III of this series, we looked at the #5 Alfa Romeo Giulietta SS.  Now, we will examine the Alfa Romeo Giulia Berlina.  This is the 4-door sedan (or berlina) made by Alfa from 1962-1978.   This must have been when Togi stopped numbering the baseplates on their new releases.  From online photos, the baseplate only reads 7/63 with no #6 anywhere.

NOTE: Koen Beekmann took the photos or acquired them from other collectors, unless otherwise noted.

Some Togi History

The original founder and owner of Togi, Alberto Lorenzini,  sold the company in the early 1990s; he passed away about 1995.  An article on Togi in the Italian magazine, Quattroruotine N°206, Nov. 1997, stated Togi had a new owner, so it was definitely sold sometime before 1997.  The original company used some small local factories to make all the casting for them.   The new owner, Alberto Lanzani,  was one of them (he made the Alfa 164 castings) and took two years or so for him to find all the molds and tools for all the toy cars from all the other factories.  The tools of the Giulia Berlina were lost, because the small company who produced the castings was long gone by then.

Giulia Berlina

In 1963, Togi brought out the Giulia TI Berlina model as a toy car with four doors, bonnet, and boot lid that all opened. That was quite special at the time. Mr Lorenzini had to find out for himself how to make all the openings work and how the hinges attached.  Was this the first toy car with all opening parts?  Edil Toys  did not make their 1/43 Giulia with 6 opening parts until 1966.

The early hinges on the Giulia look very different than later models.  The doors were hinged at a single point that was clamped between the bottom of the door and the floor of the interior, perhaps a strange way to do it, but Mr. Lorenzini was covering new design territory!  After the Giulia, a different method of hinging was chosen. You can see the low hinges on the disassembled early version below.

These models had a steerable front axle and front and rear suspension. A wheel key was supplied so the customer could disassemble the wheels;  with a screwdriver you could easily disassemble the whole model and then hopefully reassemble it.

Rampini (Automodelli Alfa Romeo 1910-1993, 1993) reports that  Carabinieri, Polizia, and Vigili Fuoco (Fire) versions came out in 1965.    Here is a catalog page from that time:

Then in 1967, the mold was modified to improve the lines of the model. After that, two new grills were available with clear headlight lenses:  Giulia 1600 Super (4 headlights) and a year later the Giulia 1300 (two headlights). The rear lights were no longer cast as part of the aluminum body but attached using separate red plastic parts.  Rampini also says the Super version has the two police and one fire versions as well.

Here are the three versions: cast front lights, 2 headlights, and four headlights:

The second author found this proof sheet for the Giulia TI kit several years ago – a collector had acquired it in the 1970s:

Here is the box it was for, as well as the box for the assembled model:

Finally, the Giulia TI came in a rare gift set with 2 other Togis, shown here from a 1960’s catalog:

Next time in Part V, we will continue the Togi story with the Alfa Romeo 2600 Sprint.


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2017 Diecast Hall of Fame Winners

Back in April, MAR Online announced that our readers could vote for inductees into the Hall of Fame.   The ceremonies in Las Vegas are now over and the winners announced!  See the newest inductees here.  Also, some images of the event itself are at this link.

Congratulations everyone!

A lot of familiar names are on the list, plus some that have never appeared in MAR Online.  if you’d like more coverage of some of the winners, let us know!


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Scottoy Revisted

Editor’s Introduction:

(KS) There has been some discussion on the history of Scottoy online recently, so we have decided to republish this older article from Model Auto Review 208, published 7 Dec 2006.  The Editors are unsure if Scottoy continued much past 2006; certainly there are items in the proposed production list for TelModel below which we can find no trace of being produced.

The Editor and Publisher of Model Auto Review, Rod Ward,  contacted Jonathan‘s ex-partner, Antonio,  a number of times after Jonathan left to concentrate on his industrial fasteners business (bolts and screws).  See article below. After no real replies, it was assumed that Antonio was unable to find the time or enthusiasm to continue the development of Scottoy on his own. Certainly nothing more was produced to Rod or others’ knowledge.

Rod Ward’s opinion at the time was that they were wasting their time with the TelModel idea – the models fell between two stools. They were neither authentic reproductions of old toys, nor were they high-quality scale models, up to current quality standards. Rod’s store, Modelauto, had great trouble selling the TelModel Fiat 850s – the final stocks having to be disposed of on eBay at very large discounts.

The best-selling Scottoy models were initially produced to order for Modelauto – the replica scooters. Modelauto sold many hundreds of these and then Scottoy got large orders for them from other distributors as well.

Rod Ward would have liked them to produce the Costa Line cruise ships, of which Mercury had made a very interesting 1:1200 scale range. The Costa family were clients of Jonathan’s partner, so they  could have obtained permission to use their funnel logo, etc. But Rod believes that the two partners were motivated by their passion for the old Mercury toy cars, and that they were not at all interested in making ships even though the scooters Rod had encouraged them to make had been such a success.

The partners in Scottoy had started out making copies of early Mercury toy cars for their own collections, hence their lack of interest in the scooters or ships. Rod also asked if they would make copies of the very collectable Mercury aircraft, but they were similarly uninterested, unfortunately. Scottoy  was not really a ‘business’ venture, in which someone would choose the most profitable products to make. They were really just an extension of the two owners’ collecting hobby, so unless they found items interesting for their own collections, they wouldn’t make them.


‘Beam me up, Scottoy’ says co-founder Jonathan Scott

Written by Jonathan Scott in late 2004. Now published to mark Jonathan’s departure in 2006 from the firm he co-founded.

Scottoy has reached ten years old. Incredible! I would never have believed that I would ever be able to say that, when I began the long and difficult road that has led to today. Here is the story of Scottoy: Antonio Pezzini, a dentist from Genoa, and Jonathan Scott, maker of industrial fixings from Genoa, later Varese, had both been collectors since childhood. In 1993 they saw a demand for replacement parts for obsolete Italian diecast models, especially Mercury, like the Dinky and Corgi parts sold in England. Antonio had access to the technology through his work, so their destiny was decided. Initially they looked into production methods and registration of the Scottoy and Mercury names, and realised that they could reproduce the entire models in white metal, rather than just the parts. Our first products were shown at the Marco Bossi swapmeet in Turin in 1993 and proved to be of great interest to visitors. This first batch included the Fiat 600 Multipla, Fiat 1100/103, Alfa Giulietta (never before issued), Fiat 600 and Alfa Romeo 1900.

The Lancia Appia 1st series was initially sold exclusively in the UK via Modelauto.

First production: 1994-95-96 - quantity made
01 Fiat 600 dark blue, green, red 1994 - 450
02 Fiat 600 Multipla blue-white, red-black 1994 - 450
03 Alfa Giulietta saloon blue, green, red 1994 colour test black - 10
04 Alfa Romeo 1900 dark blue, red, 1994 - 370 colour test ivory - 10
05 Fiat 1100/103 1953 Red, green, lt blue 1994 - 450
19 Lancia Appia 1st ser black, green, grey, ivory 1994 - 200. First exclusively for UK, Denmark, Holland

From 1996 some models were supplied with windows. The first Scottoy buyers were mostly Mercury enthusiasts, then marque collectors and one-make club members.

Second production: 1994-95-96 - quantity made
PR2 Fiat 600 Multipla Green-white 1995 - 85 Made for Aquilone Torino
02 Fiat 600 Multipla white-lt blue, black-red 1995 - 20 colour error
PR3 Fiat 600 Multipla Taxi yellow 1996 - 30 Made for Bruce Sterling Toys USA
PR4 Fiat 600 Multipla Vigili del Fuoco Red 1996 - 30 Made for Bruce Sterling Toys USA
06 Cadillac Eldorado black, blue, red, yellow 1994 - 340
07 Innocenti-BMC 950 Spider red, lt blue 1994 - 325
08 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint lt blue, red, yellow, dark blue 1994 - 450
09 Fiat 500 red, green, white, ice 1995 -215
10 Lancia Appia 3rd ser dk blue, lt blue, grey 1995 -  195
11/PR5 Autobianch Bianchina red-black , green-ivory, grey-lt blue 1996 - 330. First batch sold exclusively in UK and through the Club Bianchina Italia.
12/24 Fiat 1800 saloon blue-grey, red-ivory, white-black, brown-cream 1996 - 85. Test batch.
13/36 Lancia Flaminia grey, dark blue, white-ivory 1996 - 60. test batch, some sold to Lancia Club Holland.

The second series of the 600 Multipla was on a modified prototype base, a short series for Aquilone in Turin and Bruce Sterling in USA. The 1800, Flaminia and the last Innocenti 950, Sprint and 500 were given windows. Our UK distributor Modelauto (publishers of MAR), asked in Summer 1994 if we could produce a short series of Vespa and Lambretta scooters. So we made an initial series of 200 each type, initially exclusively for the UK. Along with the Ape three wheeler derivation of the Vespa, these were major sales successes in the Scottoy range.

Vespa and Lambretta models 1994 onwards
17 Vespa 125  dark red, ivory, ice white, pink, 1994 
17 Vespa 125 red fuoco, green  yellow, lt blue 1996
17 Vespa 125 dark green, white, ivory 1998
17 Vespa 125 French blue, pale blue, ivory 2000
17 Vespa 125 met green, silver, dark blue, grey 2002
17 Vespa 125 amaranth 2004 - Total all versions: 4800
17o Vespa 125 50th anniversary gold 1997 - 500
PR1 Vespa KIT 1995 - 150 exclusive for Modelauto UK
18 Lambretta 125 Sage, ivory, green 1994
18 Lambretta 125 Rosa, white, red, dark blue 1995
18 Lambretta 125 lt blue, lemon yellow, ice white 1998
18 Lambretta 125 Red - 2000
18 Lambretta 125 apple green, silver, ivory 2002
18 Lambretta 125 met green 2004 - total all versions: 2950
18s Lambretta 125 50th anniversary gold 1999 - 200
13 Lambretta 125D Sage, yellow, red, ivory 1998 Total of all versions: 1250
13 Lambretta 125D silver, metallic green, red 2001
13 Lambretta 125 dark blue 2004
13s Lambretta 125D 50th anniversary gold 1999 - 200
13LC Lambretta125LC Closed red, white , ivory, sage, light blue 2000 - 800
13LC Lambretta125LC Closed metallic green 2004
13LCo Lambretta125LC 50th anniv gold  2002 - 160

Modelauto had two exclusive versions: pink Vespa and Vespa kit. The last scooters were in 1998, the Lambretta 125D with spare wheel, and in 2000 the Lambretta 125LC with enclosed engine compartment.

When the frenzy of scooter production abated, we returned to cars, but we had production problems when making the Fiat 1800 (which turned out well) and the Lancia Flaminia, which  went to Club Lancia Holland in 1994, and was recast in 2001. Also in this period I moved from Genoa to Varese. To help with production we enlisted the help of others, first Enrico Niccolini of Off ’43 models, Angelo Bellotti, an associate of Mr Niccolini and proprietor of the Giocher range, and pattern maker Faustino Mattei. From 1996 our main distributor was Miniminiera, Piergiorgio and Luca Casati.

Italian cars, second series 1996 to 2004 
09 Fiat 500 fire red, green, white 1996  865. In 1998 35 were test-built in sky blue, of which 12 were finished in promo livery Nastro Azzurro. Amaranth and dark blue were new colours for 2004 
11 Autobianch Bianchina sky blue, green, fire red 1996 - 940. Grey was a new colour for 2004 
11ab Autobianch Bianchina Abarth red 1998 - 100
11vf Autobianch Bianchina Vd fuoco red 1998 - 100
10 Lancia Appia 3rd series grey, green, light blue 1997 - 450. Amaranth was a new colour for 2004
25 Lancia Appia 3rd series Taxi green-black 1998 - 340 with interior
30 Lancia Appia 3rd series Vigili del fuoco red 1999 - 315 with interior
30a Lancia Appia 3rd series AGIP Yellow 1999 - 100
19 Lancia Appia 1st series black, green, grey, dark blue 1997 - 400
19 Lancia Appia 1st series Cream, light grey, black, green 2000 - 185. From 2000 with windows.
26 Lancia Appia 1st series Taxi green-black 1998 - 350 with windows and interior
29 Lancia Appia 1st series  Vigili del fuoco red 2000 - 100 with windows and interior
19s Lancia Appia 1st series 50th anniv gold 2004 - 100
23 Fiat 1500 long Taxi green-black 1998 - 535
24 Fiat 1500 black, red-white, white-black, blue-white 1999 - 320
24a Fiat 1500 AGIP Yellow 2000 - 80
07 Innocenti-BMC 950 Spider mustard, white, blue 1999 - 240. Grey was a new colour for 2004
08 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint red, white, dark green 2000 - 180. Dark blue was a new colour for 2004
08s Alfa Giulietta Sprint 50th anniv gold 2004 - 100
33 Fiat 600 grey, cream, pale blue 1999 - 240 with windows and interior. Dark blue new colour for 2004
33a Fiat 600 AGIP Yellow 1999 - 100 windows & interior
33E Fiat 600 Esso red 2004 - 80 windows and interior
33? Fiat 600 Polizia Stradale olive 2004 - 80 with windows and interior.
33p Fiat 600 Polizia grey 2000 - 200 windows, interior
33vdf Fiat 600 Vigili del Fuoco red 2002 - 110 with windows and interior
03 Alfa Romeo Giulietta saloon blue, red 1999 - 250. with windows and interior. Black new colour for 2004
03a Alfa Romeo Giulietta saloon Abarth red 1999 - 110 with windows and interior
31 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Polizia 1956 Grey  1999 - 210. with windows and interior
31pv Alfa Romeo  Giulietta Polizia 1960 olive 2002 - 110 with windows, interior and beacon
03? Alfa Romeo Giulietta saloon Esso red 2004 - 75 with windows and interior
03vdf Alfa Romeo Giulietta saloon Vigili del Fuoco red 2004 - 75. with windows, interior and beacon
04 Alfa Romeo 1900 Ivory, green, amaranth 2000 - 150
04vdf Alfa Romeo 1900 Vigili del Fuoco red 2000 - 100
04P Alfa Romeo 1900 Polizia Stradale olive 200 - 100
21 Fiat 1100/103 (1953) black, grey, iivory 1999 - 350. 1999 test colour: 5 in BRG. Green new colour 2004
22 Fiat 1100/103 (1953) Taxi 1999 - 430
28P Fiat 1100/103 (1953) Polizia Stradale 2004 - 75
28 Fiat 1100/103 (1953) Vigili del Fuoco 1999 - 300
28A Fiat 1100/103 (1953) AGIP 1999 - 100
21o Fiat 1100/103 (1953) 50th anniv gold 2004 - 1100
36 Lancia Flaminia silver, white , amaranto 200 - 1215
36 vdf Lancia Flaminia Vigili del Fuoco red 2002 - 190
36P Lancia Flaminia Polizia Stradale olive 2002 - 90
23S Fiat 1500 Spyder green, white, red, blue 200 - 210
23sc Fiat 1500 Spyder red, yellow 2002 - 80

Following the scooters, in 1997 we made the Ape (bee) three wheeler, a replica of the Mercury in its open version; but we wanted a box body as well. This was crafted by Antonio Pezzini using materials he uses in his dental practice. Our first Ape promo livery was for Brill, then Abarth plugs, plus a standard version. For BEA srl Mr Antonini had a Christmas edition for his customers, the first in a long series. Miniminiera ordered others, in Gaggia, Campari and Martini liveries. Other promos included Take-off, Foritex and Piaggio France.

Ape three wheeler: produced 1997 onwards
20 Ape open grey , red, cream, 1997
20 Ape open grey-yellow, red-green, red-cream 1997
20 Ape open amaranth-yellow, blue-white 2004 Total of all versions: 1650
PR27 Ape open red-olive 2001 - 100 for Take-off snc
PR6 Ape van (open driver) BEA Blue-white 1997 - 250
15 Ape van (open driver) Brill yellow 1998 - 370
15a Ape van (open driver) Abarth plugs Red 1998 - 325
14 Ape van (open driver) Blue-white, red- white, green-sand - 1998 Total of all versions: 400
21 Ape box body blue-yellow, dk blue-white 2000
PR7 Ape box body Gaggia olive-sand 1998 - 40
PR8 Ape box body Martini red-white 1998 - 40
PR9 Ape box body Campari blue-white 1998 - 40
15e Ape box body Esso red 2004 - 75
16ol Ape box body Olio Sasso green-/white 2004 - 75
16ram Ape box body Ramazzotti black-red 2004 - 75
16sc  Ape box body Scottoy yellow-red 2004 - 75
PR43 Ape box Piaggio France blue-white 2004 - 200
PR31Ape tubes Foritex met green-beige 2001 - 100

The first pattern maker for  Scottoy was Dr Pezzini, using techniques and materials from his dental practice to modify castings or add pieces (such as taxi signs). These elaborations led to the question, are they Mercury or not? We just described the Scottoy range as 1:48 models in the style of the fifties and sixties, adding police, fire or taxi versions as demanded by modern collectors, continuing in the spirit of Mercury.

From 1998 we made non-Italian cars; Beetle, Continental, Eldorado, Golden Hawk and Bentley S3, the latter with right hand drive!

Foreign cars second series (1998-onwards)
12 Ford-Lincoln Continental sand, blue, red, green, red 1998 - 700
06 Cadillac Eldorado red, ivory, blue, green 1998 - 350 Interior slightly modified, test run approx 30 in pink
32 VW Beetle grey, red, green, bluel 2001 - 380 2002 15 test white. 2004: yellow, amaranth, dk blue
PR38 VW Beetle BLU 3 promo white  2002 - 150
34 Studebaker Golden Hawk silver, amaranth, blue 2001 - 165
38 Bentley S3 RHD Ivory, white, dark blue 2001 - 165

Having made big cars and little scooters, in 1999 we made a small scale model of the massive Fiat-Viberti fuel tanker from the 1950s. We planned 300 of each version.

Fiat-Viberti (1999-onwards)
A27E Viberti Esso red 1999 - 220
27A Viberti Agip Yellow 1999 - 225
27M Viberti Mobil Red 2000 - 75
27F Viberti Fina Blue 2001 - 75
PR2 Viberti promo Tectubi dark yellow 2000 - 120
27S Viberti Shell Yellow-Red 2001 - 75
27PC Viberti Petrol Caltex Red 1999 - 145
27PL Viberti Petrolea Red 2002 - 70
27MIL Viberti green military 2003 - 70
27AI Viberti Aquila blue-white 2003 - 70

In 1999, as Scottoy was approaching the new millennium, questions arose as to our future direction. Should we go into diecast? We spoke to Rio, Progetto-K and Brumm, to ensure that any new product would not conflict with their plans; and we decided to produce a 1:43 scale Fiat 850. Giocher were already making the Fiat 600 Multipla and Coriasco, and could handle the 850 parts, so Faustino Mattei made a prototype, and we calculated that tooling costs would break even at 15,000 pieces, if we could sell them. The birth of TelModel! The 850 made less concessions to the ‘Scottoy style’ but continued the Mercury sixties approach, with a minimum of components, unlike many current ‘handbuilt kits’ with too many parts.

Telmodel (2000 onwards)
TEL 01 Fiat 850 saloon 1964 red, sable, grey, blue 2000
Total of all versions: 1170 blue, white 2001 green 2003
PR22 Fiat 850 1964 promo UAN pink 2000 - 100
TEL 02 Fiat 850 Carabinieri 1966 dark blue 2000 - 325
TEL 03 Fiat 850 1964 Polizia Sq Mobile olive 2001 - 210
TEL 04 Fiat 850 1964 Vigili del Fuoco Red 2000  - 230
TEL 13 Fiat 850 1964 AGIP Yellow 2001 - 150
TEL 05 Fiat 850 1964 driving school blue 2000 - 160
TEL 06 Fiat 850 1964 Croce Rossa It. White  2000 - 230
TEL 09 Fiat 850 1964 Guardia Finanza grey 2001 - 110
TEL 10 Fiat 850 Pol Strad Autosole olive 2001 - 210
TEL 12 Fiat 850 Croce Bianca Milano blue 2001 - 210
TEL 08 Fiat-Abarth 1000 road silver, white 2001 - 325
TEL 07 Fiat 850 Carabinieri 1964 Green 2002 - 160
TEL 11 Fiat 850 1964 Italian army Green 2002 - 160
TEL 15 Fiat-Abarth 1000 Yellow, Green, grey 2003 - 120
TEL 16 Fiat 850 1964 Ramazzotti Red 2003 - 60
TEL 14 Fiat 850 1964 Esso Red 2003 - 70
TEL 100 Fiat Ritmo 3 door 1978 60L Red 2003 - 100
TEL 101 Fiat Ritmo 3 door 1978 65L Green  2003 - 100
TEL 102 Fiat Ritmo 3 door 1978 75L White 2003 - 100
TEL 103 Fiat Ritmo 3 dr 1978 75CL Bronze 2003 - 100
TEL 104 Fiat Ritmo 3 dr 1978 60CL grey-blue 2003 - 100

The gestation was slow, but the 850 was an immediate success. At the end of 2003 the second TelModel appeared; a Fiat Ritmo. Meanwhile, the biggest activity at Scottoy was producing promotional models…

Special models and promotionals (R000 = Brumm)
PR1 Vespa KIT 1995 - 150 exclusive for Modelauto UK
PR2 Fiat 600 Multipla green-/white 1995 - 85. Exclusively for Aquilone, in Turin
PR3 Fiat 600 Multipla TAXI Yellow 1996 - 30 special for Bruce Sterling Toys USA
PR4 Fiat 600 Multipla Vigili del Fuoco red 1996 - 30 special for Bruce Sterling Toys, USA
PR5 Bianchina red-black, green-ivory, grey-blue 1996 - 50. Promo for Club Bianchina Italia
PR6 Ape box body BEA dk blue-white 1997 - 250 promo
PR7 Ape box Gaggia olive-sand 1998 - 40 Miniminiera
PR8 Ape box Martini red-white 1998 - 40 Miniminiera
PR9 Ape box Campari Blue-white 1998 - 40 Miniminiera
PR10 Alfa Romeo F12 Maitech USA Yellow 1998 - 280
PR11 Alfa Romeo F12 Bufab Norge White promo 1998 - 300. These Alfa vans all on base of Off '43.
PR12 Alfa Romeo F12 BEA White promo 1998 - 150
PR13 Alfa 'Romeo' van BEA White, blue top 1998 - 150
PR14 Alfa Romeo F12 BEA Nederland White 1998 - 50
PR15 Alfa 'Romeo' van BEA Nederland White, blue top 1998 - 50. All on Off '43 base models.

Special models (R000 = Brumm) continued
PR16 Fiat 1100E van BEA dark blue-white 1999 - 300 on Brumm R177, finished by Scottoy
PR17 Fiat 1100E van BEA Nederland dark blue-white 1999 - 50. On R177.
PR18 Fiat 1100E IPS  yellow-black 2000 - 350 R177.
PR19 Fiat 1100E Maitech USA yellow 2000 - 350 R177.
PR20 Fiat 1100E Bufab Norge green 2000 - 450.R177.
PR21 Fiat-Viberti tanker Tectubi  yellow 2000 - 120
PR22 Fiat 850 UAN promo pink 2000 - 100
PR23a Fiat 600 Multipla BEA blue-white 2000 - 170. Promo on Brumm R250 first 170 with decal livery.
PR23b Fiat 600 Multipla BEA blue- white 2000 - 130. Brumm R250 tampo printed.
PR24 Fiat 600 Multipla BEA Nederland Blue-white 2000 - 50. On Brumm R250.
PR25 Fiat 600 Multipla Saudi BEA blue-white 2000 - 100. On Brumm R250.
PR26 Fiat 600 Multipla Bufab Norge green 2001 - 30 R250
PR27Ape open red-olive 2001 - 100 for Take-off snc
PR28 Lancia Aprilia BEA white 2001 - 300. Brumm R061
PR29 Lancia Aprilia BEA Nederland White 2001 - 50 R061
PR30 Lancia Aprilia Saudi BEA White 2001 - 250. R061
PR31 Ape Foritex beige-met green promo 2001 - 100
PR32a, PR32b Fiat 500B Servizi PT Statali grey 2002-3 Exclusive for Poste Italiane. On Brumm R050
PR33a-PR33b Fiat1100E Servizi PT Statali grey 2002 Exclusive for Poste Italiane. On Brumm R177
PR34 Jaguar XK120 Convertible Bufab Norge light green 2002 - 315. On Brumm R101
PR35 Ferrari 500/F2 BEA dark blue 2002 - 300. R035
PR36 Ferrari 500/F2 BEA Nederland dk blue 2002 - 50
PR37 Ferrari 500/F2 Saudi Bea dark blue 2002 - 200
PR38 VW Beetle 1200 BLU 3 promo White 150 - 2002
PR39 Jaguar XK120 Bufab Norge green 2003 - 365
BS019, S03/08, PR40 Cooper T53 F1 BEA Blue 2003 - 350 Promo on Brumm R300
BS020, S023A, PR41 Cooper T53 F1 BEA Nederland Blue 2003 - 50 Promo on Brumm R300
BS021, S023B, PR42 Cooper T53 F1 Saudi Bea dark blue 2003 - 50 Promo on Brumm R300
BS022, S023C, PR43 Ape van Piaggio France promo blue-white 2004 - 200
PR44 Fiat 1100E Dental Ambulance Dott Pezzini Genova beige 2004 - 44. based on Brumm R179, modified by Scottoy with approval of Brumm.
BS023a, S04/26a, PR45 Fiat 1100E dental ambulance Dott i Pratolongo-Farina Genova beige 2004 - 44
BS023b, S04/26b, PR46 Fiat 1100E dental ambulance Dott i Foglia-Ferraggiaro Genova beige 2004 - 44
BS023c, S04/26c, PR47 Fiat 600D Bufab Norge light green 2004 - 325 promo on Brumm R349 by Scottoy
BS024, S04/19, PR48 Alfa Romeo 158 F1 BEA dk blue 2004 - 350. On Brumm R036 by Scottoy
BS025, S04/17A, PR49 Alfa Romeo 158 F1 BEA Nederland dark blue 2004 - 50. On Brumm R036.
BS026, S04/17B, PR50 Alfa Romeo 158 F1 Saudi Bea dark blue 2004 - 75. On Brumm R036.
BS027, S04/17C, PR51 Fiat 1100E van Glamal Engineering silver-dark green 2004 - 320 Brumm R177.

Our first collaboration with another maker to produce promo models was with Off ’43, but from 1999 we made an important link with Rio Tattarletti of Brumm, with whom we produced 30 special issues in five years, including major issues for Poste Italiane.

For the tenth anniversary of Scottoy we made a new series of the Fiat 600 Multipla. Other plans include the Mercury 2000 series in 1:43 scale, such as the Fiat 124, 125 and 132, in many versions, and Fiat 682 truck.

Tel Model plans include Fiat Ritmo five door and Fiat 1500. Mercury classic models in the 1:40 Series, limited production.  New Scottoy models made from the end of 2004 include the Bianchina Panoramica, the Fiat 1100/103E (central light), the Lancia Flavia and the Fiat 1300.

Thanks: To everyone who has contributed to our development, in chronological order:

CLM Hitech di Genova, Messrs Destrero and Lavagetto, Grifo fusioni, Mr Ivaldi,   Beniamini prototipi, Elettren Castellanza,  Bruno Boracco, L’Aquilone Torino, Bruno Romano, Scatolificio San Giorgio, Genova,  Alfredo Albertini, Ruoteclassiche and Quattroruotine, Danilo Castellarin, Modelli Auto di Duegi Editrice, Modelauto UK, Rod and Val Ward Modelshop Cana, Japan , Bruce Sterling Toys, USA, La F1 del Modellismo di Franco Spreafico, Lorenzi Modellismo/U.A.N. S.a.s. di Agostino Zacchello, Bianchina Club, Dr Viceconte,  Alessandro Rigatto, Lancia Club Olanda, Mr Okke Mouissie,   Formula 43, Argus Miniature, M Flament,  Angelo Bellotti, Giocher, Enrico Niccolini, Off ’43,   Faustino Mattei prototipi, La Miniminiera di Piergiorgio Casati S.a.s, SMF AG Sonder Modell, Silvano Minari, M Models, Germac stampi, Mr. Agostino   –   Vamarplast, Mr Lino, La Tranciatura, Mr Bosoni,  Effegi, Mr Arnaboldi, Torneria Automatica, Mr Maverna, Microfusioni Artistiche, Mrnora Folli,   Silvia Cucchi, Zanchetti decal, Mr Sanchetti,   Bea Srl, Mr Antonini, Bufab Norge, Mr Willy Jensen,   Brumm, Rio Tattarletti, IPS Srl, Mr, ra Morra, Maitech International, J B Kale, Foritex srl, Mr, Bollani,   Poste Italiane Spa., Piaggio France SA,   Top Model, Pasquale De Stasio,  Francesco Calabro, Auto d’Epoca …   Everybody else who I forgot to mention … And all collectors everywhere.

As announced in MAR 207, I have handed over my part of Scottoy to my friend and partner Antonio Pezzini, so my role in the company has finished. It was a difficult decision, but after 13 years I decided that it was time to finish and spend more time with my family and personal life.  Good Collecting!


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Togi History – Part III

by Koen Beekmann and Karl Schnelle

In Part II of this series, we looked at the #3  Giulietta Sprint and the #4 159 Formula One car.  Now, we will examine the Alfa Romeo Giulietta SS. NOTE: Koen Beekmann took the photos or acquired them from other collectors, unless otherwise noted.  He also conducted all the research which we are compiling here. Without his enthusiasm for Togi, these articles would not have been possible.

The fifth car in the Togi lineup, the #5 Alfa Romeo Giulietta SS, or Sprint Speciale, was introduced right after the 159  in 1960 or so (see advertisement below).  As with the previous Togi’s, the number is cast on the baseplate (No 5).  Rampini says it was based on the 1957 model, so perhaps it also took several years to develop as with the previous Togi models.  However, it is not quite clear which model was the starting point for the Togi: 1957 was the prototype and the first production series was 1959-1960, with a re-introduction a year later.

Here is an un-dated Togi catalog illustration.  As with other Togi’s, both built and kit versions were available:

This model car went through three generations (listed in order):

  1. Without bumpers and with smooth wheels. Very rare and short lived.
  2. With bumpers, closed side windows and cast-in rear lights.  No interior, just a deck that hides the rear axle.
  3. With bumpers, open side windows, a real interior and separate rear lights. As with other newer Togi, these are made of zamac and much heavier than the previous generations.

The three versions are shown below in a scan from an old Quattroruotine magazine (No 206, Nov/Dec 1997): left is the very rare and oldest bumper-less version, in the middle is the  version with bumpers and side windows, and on the right is the latest version:

Incidentally, the bumper-less version is not just a model without bumpers; the two body parts lack the front and rear holes for mounting the bumpers.   The lack of bumpers suggests that the oldest Togi model was based on the first Giulietta production version, but why was there no back bumper while the 1: 1 had one?  Or was it meant to be a sports car version where the ‘sportiness’ was enhanced by leaving the bumpers off?

Also, the wheels of the first version do not have any round holes. These wheels are made especially for the SS and no other Togi, for some reason.

Both the authors love the Sprint Speciale, so here are photos from the 2016 Alfa Romeo Owners Club meeting in Nashville, TN, USA:

{Photos by Karl Schnelle.]

The last two are Giulia SS’s, which were produced for a couple years right after the Giuliettas (same car with a bigger engine).

The 1st generation car is very rare in comparison to the other two.  Perhaps this bumper-less version did not last long at all.  It does seem to look a bit more like the 1957 Alfa prototype.  The photos below show that there were no holes for the bumpers in this version.

Here is a 2nd generation where you can see how the bumpers are attached:

The  older version (2nd generation) with box is shown on the left below;  the current version (3rd generation) with nickel-colored chrome parts on the right. The key for the wheel hub was standard on many Togi’s.  Notice that SS is spelled out on the box as Sprint Speciale!:

The older model (blue) has cast rear lights, while the later version (red) has the separate, chromed lights:

Here is a closeup of the blue one, the 2nd generation:

Maybe the windows were deleted so one could see the new interiors?  🙂   Here is a rare green version with interior; the wheels are silver colored but not chromed so it’s a later 3rd generation:

With three generations, many colors, and with and without race numbers, someone could collect a large number of just these Alfa Sprint Speciales!


Postscript – A French advertisement from September 1961 shows the Togi SS.  In France, Togi’s were imported and distributed by Safir, another toy car company.  The SS pictured below looks to have bumpers so it is not the first version!  This seems too early, so perhaps the Togi model was introduced in 1960 or 61, and not in 1962 as commonly thought?

Next time in Part IV, we will continue the Togi story with the Alfa Romeo Giulia Berlina.


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Togi History – Part II

by Koen Beekmann and Karl Schnelle

In Part I of this series, we looked at the founding of Togi and its first 2 cars.   #1 Cursor and #2 Turbo Special were introduced around 1958.  NOTE: Koen Beekmann took all the photos unless otherwise noted.  He also did all the research which we are compiling here.

Here is a little more information on the Turbo Special. They are still made today and accompanied by a drawing in the box.  The current castings are diecast using zamac alloy, but the original ones were  aluminum or some other light-weight alloy. Two versions of the drawings are shown below with the different front steering mechanism. The curved arms are the earlier design on the left are Photoshopped from the original on the right.   To determine if the original design could easily fit into the newer drawing, Koen tried it (and it does)!

And here is the mold for the Turbo Special; it looks like the earlier casting before the wrap-around windshield and is from the original owner, Mr Lorenzini.


The rest of Part II will concentrate on the next two models that came out.

After the first two cars, Togi moved on to reproducing actual automobiles.  All were Alfa Romeos in 1:23 scale (except for a Lancia).  Perhaps to keep the cars in the same size range as the first two, Mr. Lorenzini  chose the unusual scale of 1:23.  In the late 1950’s, there weren’t any 1:24 or 1:25 scale cars, so why not 1:23?

Thus, the third model was a 1:23 1959 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint. The development of this first Alfa model was delayed due to funding until 1959 or 60 and was finally on sale by 1962 (Rampini).  The earliest casting might not have Togi in the bottom and could in fact be a Trilor, Mr Lorenzini’s first company.  An Italian collector has one in his collection that he thinks is a Trilor (no name on the baseplate).   If this is the case, then Rampini could be mistaken and perhaps the first three cars were all made as Trilors first?   We may never know for sure…

Two generations of the #3 Giulietta Sprint are shown below.  The box calls it a Sprint Veloce (the higher horsepower version):

The first generation (in green on the left) has no interior, tight side windows, large wheels and metal headlights. The second generation (white) has interior, no side windows, silver lower side body trim, clear headlights, and smaller wheels with wheel nuts. Look and compare.  That beautiful box belongs to the old model.  Here is the green model again:

This first Alfa seems a little toy-like and rounder than it should be,  maybe that was the influence of their first two streamlined cars.  Here is a drawing included in the box of a later version:

The Giulietta Sprint was really not a very accurate model. Perhaps this was the best that Togi could do at the time.  The next Togi models will get better and better as they learned how to create more accurate model cars and still keep the toy characteristics (take-off wheels, suspension, and steering).  Togi was the abbreviation of Tonino GIocattoli  – Little Tony’s Toys –  after all!


According to Rampini, both the the 159 Formula One car and Giulietta SS  were introduced in 1962.  These two Alfa Romeos are beautiful model cars and a big improvement on the Sprint.  We will examine the 159 next.

The 159 ‘Alfetta’ raced in Formula One and a few other races during the 1951 season.  Coming out 11 years later did not matter, as this was an iconic race car.  However, Koen believes the #4 Togi 159 was developed earlier than 1962, sometime in 1959 or early 1960.  After the Corsar, the Turbo Special and the Giulietta Sprint, this was the fourth model from the Milanese manufacturer.

Simple spoke wheels were developed for this model, which were then carried over to the first two Togi’s.  Furthermore, it is still evident that it is just an old-style toy car: the design has been carried out very broadly, with some remarkable details such as operating steering wheel that moves the front wheels and working wing nuts on the wheels. The Togi, like the real 159, was only made in red, although the color differed over the years. The three 159’s below each have a different red color (and different wheels).

Like the other Togis, this Alfa was also available as a kit: nice for a model from the early 1960s but very simple as a kit!  What’s more fun than having a copy of the famous Fangio’s race car with racing numbers?  However, this model used fantasy race numbers, placed in the correct location on the body. The oldest versions are shown below:

The old 159 has never disappeared from the Togi range and is still being produced. Somewhere in the early 1970’s, the model was fitted with new open spoke wheels. These chrome wheels were still very simple and similar to the spoke wheels on Dinky’s at that time. In fact, the much nicer Revival race cars, from back then, still do not command the high prices that these Togi’s do now.  Here are closeups of the two older ones:

Apparently, Togi looked to see what low-cost improvements could be made to the 159.  A new perforated protective plate was added to the side exhaust pipes, but the metal exhaust was no longer chromed. The new spoke wheels were changed to black as well.  A unusual choice because the wheels of the real 159 were always silver.   Here is the newer version, bought in 1995 (photo by Karl):

Also, here is the original mold for the 159 from Mr Lorenzini; no reason for Togi to update that!

In 2011 or just before that, Togi announced a chrome 159, actually a nickel-plated model.    The prototype is shown below.

Several years later, it came to production and is listed on their website currently.  Three versions are shown: gold, ‘black’ nickel, and ‘white’ nickel.  This is a photo from Togi before it was released:

Many of the later Togi came with a plastic display case inside the outer box.  Similar to the Turbo Special,  a nice drawing was also included in the box, in case an enterprising kid wanted to take apart the 159 and hopefully put it back together:

Koen did an internet search and found at least five box types (not in any particular order):

  • nice red drawing of the 159 (original silver wheels)
  • color stripes on cardboard box (black wheel version)
  • yellow box with small window on the edge (silver or black wheels)
  • Styrofoam box with red/yellow sticker, inside is a clear plastic display box with brown base (black wheels)
  • Togi in white letters inside a red stripe on a sticker on a thin cardboard box (silver or black wheel versions)

Next time in Part III, we will continue the Togi story with the Giulietta SS.


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Polish Ice Cream Truck, a 1:43 Conversion

By John-William Greenbaum

Here’s a decidedly post-communist truck converted from a communist-era design: the ZUK A-11B Pickup Truck (a 1/43 Polish partworks truck made by Ixo), as converted into an ice cream truck for Lodmor, a manufacturer of ice cream, sorbet, and yogurt in Gdansk!  This model truck was for sale in Poland and converted by some unknown person.

The Plasticville figure was actually part of the conversion in the rear suite, but came loose in transit. I’ve since reattached her using that guaranteed-to-work method: double-sided tape!

The ZUK A-11B was a pretty popular pickup truck in Poland more or less throughout the seventies and eighties, actually surviving communism to be manufactured in the nineties, albeit not in huge numbers. However, so many were in service and parts were so inexpensive that you could indeed convert these trucks into commercial vehicles like rent-a-trucks or indeed ice cream trucks that generally speaking weren’t crucial to Polish infrastructure.

Given the amount of French and German ice cream trucks made in a similar manner that are still on the streets manufactured in the seventies and eighties, I’d honestly not be surprised if one could walk around Gdansk and find one of these driving around.  In fact I found photos of one in-service and one not.

Remarks on the Real Truck

The last of the FSC ZUK pickup trucks, the ZUK A-11B, was probably the most successful of any of them. Based externally on the 1966-vintage ZUK A-14 Export Fire Truck that essentially inspired all post-1966 ZUK vehicles, it could best be seen as the successor to the ZUK A-03 pickup, which was the very first of FSC ZUK’s pickup trucks. As with the boxy A-03 it was meant to replace, the original ZUK A-11, which was introduced in 1968, made extensive use of corrugated steel in the construction of the cab. The most noticeable improvement was a hood that flipped up easily.

Although somewhat problematic due to an incredibly high center of gravity that saw the pickups often literally tip over onto their sides, it was all in all an improvement over the ZUK A-03 in the reliability department. Although handling could best be described as awful, the ZUK A-11 did at the very least receive a responsive steering wheel so as to try and prevent as many trucks from tipping onto their sides as possible. It did, however, have two glaring problems. First among these was that the engine design was still the old GAZ-M20 Pobeda engine. Worse, however, was that the truck used a wooden cargo bed that often dry-rotted and had all kinds of problems with cracking and damage.

In 1973, the vehicle received a new, more powerful engine, being renamed the ZUK A-11M. However, the problem with the wooden cargo bed proved rather serious. In 1975, the ZUK A-11M was withdrawn from production in favor of the ZUK A-11B that you see featured here.  In 1998, the ZUK A-11B had the honor of being the very last truck to roll off FSC ZUK’s assembly line before then factory  was closed for good. Many stayed in service for years afterward in all kinds of jobs.

Fir this example, the cargo bed has been removed and replaced by a nineties-era ice cream truck suite! Lodmor is still a manufacturer of ice cream in Gdansk, and that’s the corporate sponsor that this particular A-11B ice cream truck has. Note the folding side window and refrigeration unit as well, which are probably licensed copies of features found on German or French ice cream trucks. A truck like this probably would have remained in service well into the twenty-first century, as there was absolutely no need to replace it with something technologically superior. Heck, I’m willing to bet there are is more than one of these still driving around, given the presence of Renaults from the sixties in France, old Mercedes-Benz O-series trucks in Germany, old Leylands driving around Britain, and seventies Dodge trucks driving around here in the US.

Given how successful  a late 1960’s design was doing in the 1990’s, one is forced to wonder just how well it could have done had FSC ZUK’s  communist bureaucrats not nearly destroyed the design during the 1980’s (updated the flaws with the wooden cargo bed, etc).

ZUK A-11B Lodmor Ice Cream Truck Conversion 
Poland, 1:43 Model by Ixo, modified by unknown
Figure by Plasticville, painted and modified
Years Built: 1975-1998
Engine: 70 HP 4-cylinder four-stroke
Fuel Type: Gasoline
Top Speed: 63 mph

More details about the real 1:1 scale ZUK  A-11B can be seen on the author’s Facebook page.


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