Supercars UK Partwork

Edited by Maz Woolley with contributions from Mike Allen and Jeffrey Stevenson.

Text by, and copyright of, the respective Authors. Photographs as credited. If no credit stated photograph by, and copyright of, the Editor. 

Just as my editorials had questioning the future of part works here in the UK both Mike Allen and Jeffrey Stevenson drew my attention to a new partwork being sold in the UK. This is currently being advertised on UK TV where Jeffrey saw the advert and was tempted to buy one, Supercars: The world’s greatest cars in miniature. The first part is in the shops now and I’ll let Mike take over the story:  “The format is similar to previous partworks – a huge piece of cardboard with a model car, a magazine about the car and information on future models. As usual the first one is sold at a very low price: 2.99 GB Pounds. After that the next one is 5.99 and then the remainder 10.99.

Photo Credit: Mike Allen

Mike says of the model: “The first model, a 1:43 scale Ferrari LaFerrari 2013 (most models have the year date in the description, a good idea), is in a hard plastic display box. Good features for me are the deep rich red colour, engine details, highlighted disc pads and the Ferrari logo on the centre of the steering wheel. The magazine is informative, but I wish it had some photos of real cars on roads as well as artwork and studio shots. For an additional £1.50 an issue subscribers get three 1:24 scale models, which look to have opening parts. The full collection is 60 models.”

Jeffrey says of the model: “It’s a nicely finished model with no opening features, but with glazed front lights, very good wheels, windscreen wipers and mirrors. The interior is clearly visible and looks good and there is a representation of the engine visible behind the passenger cabin. The base plate has a blank space where a maker’s name might appear on a different issue of the model.”

Photo Credit: Jeffrey Stevenson

Of the magazine Jeffrey says: “Each car comes with a magazine. This isn’t bad – a bit of a ‘showroom glossy’ type of magazine, but not bad.

With reviews like that, and the bargain price, I went to a newsagent and bought myself the La Ferrari to see what it was like and dissembled it to see if I could find any clue as to its maker. But no part had any markings other than a code number . If asked to guess I would say that this was made by either Universal Hobbies or PCT Industries (Ixo‘s parent)and is finished to a good standard for a budget model.

To find out more I initially went to the UK Panini site and there is absolutely no mention of the collection there.  However ‘Googling‘ quickly lead me to www.modelsupercarcollection.com which is the dedicated site for the collection. Browsing the site soon made it clear that the collection is distributed in the UK by Panini but is actually originated by Centauria whose logo appears on the cover of the magazine that comes with the model. Further investigation suggest that they, like DeAgostini, are substantial players on the Italian partwork market. In fact they are running both a Supercars series and Ferrari series  currently in Italy.

If any reader decides to collect this series we at MAR Online would  love to see a photograph or two of each model and to have your comments on how good they are. The models advertised as coming in the future are:

  • McLaren P1 2013
  • Ferrai Panamerica 2018
  • Bugatti Chiron 2016
  • Aston Martin DB11 2016
  • Lamborghini Aventador 2103
  • Ferrari 812 Superfast 2017

For subscribers only  the following additional models will be sent:

  • Maserati Bora Gruppo 4 1973
  • Lamborghini  400 GT Flying Star II
  • Aston Martin DB7 Zagato
  • Ferrari F60 America 2015
  • Ferrari Portofino 2018

With a standard subscription there are additional free gifts: A binder for your magazines and a book called Living the Supercar Dream. If you take out a premium subscription, which adds £90 to the cost of your collection if there are 60 parts, you also get three 1:24 scale cars which are all Ferraris with some opening parts.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Autocult and Avenue 43 August 2018

By Maz Woolley

All text by, and copyright of, the Author. Photographs by the manufacturer.

The latest releases from Autocult should now be available. These are made in resin in China for Germany to 1:43 scale. This release has models from the following series: Engineers/Limited production vehicles; Streamliners; and Protoypes. As ever unusual subjects.

05023 Zunder Cupé – Argentina 1964

The Zunder was the brainchild of the brothers Nelson José and Eligio Oscar Bongiovanni, two entrepreneurs who in the early years of the 1960s build their own car factory in Río Cuarto with the backing of the state as Argentina was then a government controlled economy. Their best known product made was the  Zunder 1500, already modelled by Autocult. This was a Porsche powered plastic car with unusual styling.

The Zunder 1500 was not a commercial success so the brothers developed a coupé based on the same underpinnings. The car is clearly inspired by the Volkswagen Karmann  Ghia and only two of the coupés were made before the funding ran out and the factory shut.

 


04018 Audi Berlin-Rome Streamline Coupé – Germany 1938

The idea of a long distance race using the new Autobahns and Autostradas was born in 1937 when imagined by Adolf Hühnlein  leader of the National Socialist Automobile Corps and his Italian colleague Count Alberto Bonacossa who was a close associate of Benito Mussolini . The first race was scheduled to take place between the capitals Rome and Berlin in 1938.

German car makers took the race very seriously with the Porsche Typ 64 being perhaps the best known as this set the scene for the post war Porsche. TSM and Premium Classix have both modelled this car to 1:43 scale.

In the late 1930s Audi was a member of the Auto Union group alongside  Horch, DKW, and Wanderer.  Auto Union had concentrated increasingly on smaller cars by the end of the 1930s, so by 1938 very few Audis were made and DKW was the companies major seller.  Against that background the top  executives at Auto-Union felt compelled to compete in the Berlin to Rome long-distance race. It was clear that none of their standard production cars were fast enough to win this race and the board signed off a budget to develop some extra-fast cars which could compete in the race. The internal project name was “Stromlinien-Limousine” (Streamlined Saloon). Different versions of the car were to be made each carrying a different group brand name. Here we have the Audi based on the type 920 underpinnings wearing an aluminium bodywork designed by Paul Jaray for aerodynamic efficiency which was built by the bodymaker Hornig. Internal testing suggested that this car could reach 160 KPH which was 30 KPH more than a standard 920.

Auto-Union, and other makers,  had their cars all readied for the competition, but the long distance race was first postponed from 1938 to 1939 and with the outbreak of war ultimately completely cancelled.

 


06022 Mercedes-Benz 1.2l Prototype – Germany 1948

After the Second World War, Mercedes-Benz passenger car production commenced with the successful 170 V model, initially as an ambulance, police patrol car and delivery van. In July 1947, production of the Saloon variant also recommenced. At the same time a number of completely new vehicles were designed, some of which were unusual creations.

In 1948, a particularly small car, at least for a Mercedes-Benz, was designed. It was compact with an overall length of only 3.70 metres. It only had two doors, and inside a bench seat was fitted in the front to seat three people and a small seat was fitted in the rear for small passengers. It was to be powered by a four-cylinder OHC engine of 1.2 Litres created by shortening the 1.8-litre six-cylinder engine which was also in the project stage.

The Chief Engineer of Daimler-Benz Fritz Nallinger is quoted as saying in March 1949 The design of a light, 2- to 2½ seater car (560 kg) decided on at that time has seen a great deal of progress in the meantime and is showing some promising results. However the vehicle, along with the two engines, remained stuck at the project stage. The prototype was to be influential as its styling introduced the Ponton styling which was to become a hallmark of 1950s Mercedes-Benz cars.

Avenue 43

This line of models is distributed by Autocult. The latest Avenue 43 model is a special version of the Mustang the Ford Mustang Milano.

In 1970 Ford showcased the Milano Mustang concept car at the Chicago Auto Show. It was to show of design features which might make its way onto the next version of the Mustang. This ultra-violet coloured coupé was  inspired by the pro-touring vehicles that drove around the northern Italian city. This new Mustang design featured just two seats and an almost horizontal fastback and according to Ford it was the most “radical” Mustang seen to date. The rear glass of this concept car was sloped at 67 degrees and sported an almost horizontal electronically-powered rear deck lid. Had Ford not badged the car as a Mustang many people might not have realised that this car derived directly from the 1970 Mustang SportsRoof.

One unique feature, never seen on a road car, was the colour-changing tail lamps that glowed green during acceleration, red when the brakes were applied, and then turned back to amber when coasting. The wheel design imitated wire wheels but were  actually in aluminium and inspired many similar wheels on production cars.

Inside the purple theme continued with seats in purple leather with blue-violet cloth inserts and deep purple mohair carpeting. So ‘period’ now in the age of much blander interiors.

Whilst this exact car didn’t make it into production the design influenced not only the 1971 Mustang but also the Australian 1974 Falcon XB coupe, the car featured in the first two Mad Max movies.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

News from the Continent June/July 2018 – Norev

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

All text by, and copyright of the Author.  All photographs provided by the manufacturer.

Here are the latest releases from Norev. The models are diecast in China to various scales for Norev of France. As usual a mixture of new and historic vehicles.

June 2018 Releases

1:18 Scale

 

181632 Citroen C3 WRC No. 7 – winner Mexico 2017 – K.Meeke/P.Nagle

 

181633 Citroen C3 WRC No. 9 – Corsica 2017 – S.Lefebvre/G.Moreau

 

181634 Citroen C3 WRC No. 7 – Winner Spain 2017 – K.Meeke/P.Nagle

 

183420 Mercedes-Benz X-Class 2017 – silver

 

1:43 Scale

 

351339 Mercedes-Benz G-Class 2017 – green metallic

 

511322 Renault Kangoo 2013 “Fire Brigade”

 

511395 Renault Kangoo 2013 “Fire Brigade- fire chief staff car”

 

511326 Renault Kangoo van 2013 “Fire brigade V.L.U.”

 

511327 Renault Kangoo Van 2013 “Fire Brigade – medical rescue service”

 

511323 Renault Kangoo 2013 “Police municipale”

 

511324 Renault Kangoo 2013 “Police municipale – yellow and blue striped”

 

511325 Renault Kangoo 2013 “Gendarmerie Outre-mer”

 

511328 Renault Kangoo 2016 “Vigipirate”

 

July 2018 Releases

1:18 Scale

 

183591 Mercedes-Benz 300 saloon 1952 – dark grey

 

183457 Mercedes-Benz 450 SEL 6,9 saloon 1976 – blue grey metallic

 

188520 Volkswagen 1303 Beetle saloon 1972 – red

 

188521 Volkswagen 1303 Beetle cabriolet 1972 – orange

Scale 1:43

 

517856 Alpine A110 Premiere Edition 2017 – blue

 

155476 Citroen C4 Cactus 2018 – Aluminium grey & black decoration

 

155477 Citroen C4 Cactus 2018 – deep purple & white decoration

 

518783 Renault Master 2014 “Fire brigade first aid”

 

518784 Renault Master 2014 “Fire brigade VSAV”

 

518785 Renault Master 2014 “Fire brigade VSAV yellow bumpers”

 

1:43 Scale – Jet Car Range

 

350009 BMW M3 E30 2-door saloon 1986 – black

 

270559 Ford Sierra RS Cosworth 1986 – white

 

750033 Porsche 911 Turbo 19878 – green

 

517522 Renault Clio Williams 1993 – blue

 

840062 Volkswagen Golf GTI G60 1990 – red

 

155365 Citroen C3 WRC 2017 “Official Presentation Version

Second Release July 2018

1:18 Scale

 

182752 AC Cobra 289 1963 – white

 

182754 AC Cobra 289 1963 – black

 

 

181480 Citroen DS19 saloon 1956 – green & champagne

 

181481 Citroen DS19 saloon 1959 – Marron & Carrare white

 

187770 Fiat 500L 1968 – blue

 

183577 Mercedes-Benz 200 saloon 1966 – moss green

 

183589 Mercedes-Benz 280 CE Coupe 1980 – blue metallic

 

183467 Mercedes-Benz 300SL 1986 – Inca red

 

183453 Mercedes-AMG GT C Roadster 2017 – silver

 

183421 Mercedes-Benz X-Class 2018 – blue metallic

 

187663 Porsche 911 Turbo Targa 1987 -blue metallic

 

187595 Porsche 911 Cabriolet 1993 – black

 

188433 Volkswagen Golf Cabriolet 1995 – red

1:43 Scale

 

155584 Citroen C5 Tourer 2011 “SMUR de Forez”

 

474218 Peugeot 402 Eclipse 1937 light green

 

479818 Peugeot Partner 2010 “Fire Brigade medical service”

 

 

530023 Chausson AP52 Coach 1955 – clear grey & blue

 

1:87 Scale

 

153028 Citroen 7A 1934 – blue & black

 

153027 Citroen 11A 1937 – grey

 

155054 Citroen ID19 Break 1960 – light brown

 

158511 Citroen SM 1972 – Scarabee brown metallic

 

451896 Panhard Dyna Z12 1957 – Narcissus yellow

We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Gama Mercedes-Benz 300TD

By Frank Koh

This old diecast Mercedes-Benz 300TD diesel wagon was introduced by Gama in the late 1970s. From the 50s thru the very early 90s, this West German toy company established by George Adam Mangold produced some very interesting miniatures from Mercedes-Benz, BMW, Opel, Audi/NSU, Volkswagen, and even an occasional non-German marque. Gama was even commissioned by the German auto manufacturers to produce some official dealer promotional models, mostly in diecast metal, but a few Gama cars were made in plastic and were battery-operated or friction-powered.

Personal favorites of mine from the Gama line included the Mercedes-Benz and Opel vehicles. In the late eighties and early nineties, many European manufacturers were hit hard by globalization, and Gama was one of the better known casualties. I miss this brand.

Like the real W123 series Mercedes-Benz station wagon, this 1:26-ish scale diecast model is built to last. The real 300TD was manufactured from 1978-85, so perhaps Gama stopped producing this one as well around 1985.   It is also the first factory-built Mercedes-Benz station wagon of modern times!

This Gama is all-metal construction, including a heavy chassis plate, resulted in a little car that can become a deadly weapon in the wrong hands.

In the quarter of a century that I have owned it, I have taken great care to avoid having this exceptionally heavy miniature roll off the table and land on my foot. Truth be told, they really don’t make model vehicles the way they used too.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

 

Vector Models Plymouth Station Wagons

By John. F. Quilter

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author unless stated otherwise.

Vector Models, based in the Ukraine, produce an astounding number of resin models in 1:43 scale. Much of their production is a range of buses from the USA, Russia, and Europe.  The number of liveries and varieties is just amazing. There are also some Russian trucks and of interest to American car collectors, a small number of US cars.  Having recently finished a conversion of a White Box 1959 Plymouth sedan into a convertible I was surfing through eBay and ran across a pair of 1959 Plymouth station wagons from Vector and marketed by an eBay seller in Washington state.  There was a red two door wagon with luggage rack and a pair of four door wagons, one in blue and white and one in persimmon and white.  All these appear to be correct colour choices for that era of Plymouth.

I acquired the two door in red known as a Sport Suburban and the persimmon four door just known as a Suburban.  They make great companions to my convertible conversion, and the ‘From Russia With Love’  movie black taxi that was part of the James Bond partworks series.  The base for these appears to be an IXO diecast four door sedan though that casting seems to have now been passed on to White Box.  [Editor’s note:  White Box models are made in China by PCT, Ixo’s parent company, for Modelcarworld in Germany to Modelcarworld’s specifications. The moulds are owned by PCT Industries]. The most recent two tone blue White Box one being marketed has a side trim that is not correct for a USA car but may have been used on some rare export version. Much discussion has taken place on 1:43 scale forums on exactly where this side trim came from if it ever existed at all.  The proportions of these White Box items are very good and my only nit-picks are the incorrect side trim, the wheel covers that are not correct for a USA sold car and the lack of a black wash for the egg crate grill.   But their reasonable price makes them great candidates for “chops” or as Vector has done,  fully built up “transkits”.

On the Vector wagons I would take issue with the overly large side mirrors, the lack of conical shaped wheel covers and the lack of grill blackwash which the skilled modeller can easily add. The paint quality is truly outstanding.

They come in small cardboard boxes with a colour photo of the real car on the side.

A little background on these 1959 Plymouths: things were simpler then as each major manufacture made one basic car but it was available in multiple trim levels and usually in two and four door sedans, two door and four door pillarless hardtops and two and four door station wagon. All shared such things and bumpers and grills although side trim varied by the model. Plymouth had four trim levels, entry level Savoy with minimal chrome trim, a step up was the Belvedere, then the Fury and finally the Sport Fury which was only a two door hardtop and convertible. Engines ranged from a very long running side valve six of 230 cubic inches and 132 horsepower, to a Golden Commando 361 cubic inch V8 which developed 305 horsepower with a single four barrel carburettor and dual exhaust. Given the size of these cars, sixes were becoming less and less popular and most likely the common engine was a 318 cubic inch V8 with a two barrel carburettor which developed 230 horsepower. Transmissions were a column shifted 3 speed manual, a Powerflite two speed automatic or the newer Torqueflite three speed automatic. For maximum economy an overdrive was optional with the manual three speed. These were big cars with sedans at 208 inches long and wagons at 214. The Sport Fury and others had an optional divided front seat that swivelled sideways to aid entry. This was a Chrysler Corporation innovation that was now available in the Plymouths which was the entry level Chrysler product.

The other Vector American cars are a stretch 1956 Ford limo, a 1956 Ford convertible, a 1948 Desoto Suburban and an ambulance version of the Desoto. There is also a 1965 Ford LTD sedan stretched into an extended wheelbase limo, 1938 Packard Super Eight coupe, 1948 Ford Sibert stretch ambulance limousine and a planned Checker stretch limousine. All rare items, though the 1956 Ford convertible duplicates an earlier Vitesse issue. I suspect all these are resin modifications of diecast items.

1965 Ford LTD Stretch Limo – picture from the Internet copyright acknowledged.

But the real attraction of Vector Models is their amazing selection of buses. For bus collectors it’s worth a look. Research them via Google which can translate the Russian site to English.

https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=ru&u=http://vectormodels.com.ua/&prev=search

There is also a US Based dealer in Vector Moldels whose website is perhaps easier to use at http://www.pb-scalemodels.com/node/564 


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

More new models from Matrix August 2018

By Maz Woolley

All text by, and copyright of, the Author. All photographs supplied by the manufacturer.

Hot on the heels of the announcement of their new Racing Series  Matrix has announced new models in the main ranges for the Autumn. The models are made in resin in China for the Netherlands to 1:43 scale and are expected to be available between September and November.

As usual the models represent some scarce coachbuilt or prototype models.

MX20303-021 Chrysler Newport Dual Cowl Phaeton LeBaron cream 1941

 

MX20303-031 Chrysler Thunderbolt Concept LeBaron green metallic 1941
MX20303-032 Chrysler Thunderbolt Concept LeBaron green metallic closed 1941

 

 

MX40102-091 Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 GS Figoni Coupe black / white 1933

 

MX40408-021 Delahaye 145 V12 Franay Cabriolet #48772-3 blue metallic 1946

 

MX41306-011 Mohs Ostentatienne Opera Sedan gold metallic 1967

 

MX50108-131 Aston Martin Bulldog grey 1979


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Big Hand Crafted Four by Fours – Part Five

By Robert P. Gunn

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

Readers of MAR magazine will have been familiar with Robert’s contributions as an expert on pickup trucks. Since retirement he has been making a selection of 4×4 vehicles by hand to 1:10 scale, four of which have already appeared in MAR Online. The fifth is a 1957 Land Rover 107 inch wheelbase described by Robert below.

 

History

When the Land Rover appeared in 1948, its all terrain usefulness was much appreciated from the beginning.  But farmers and other users soon found the rear load area to be too small, owing to the very short wheelbase – 80 inches originally, then 86 inches (2.3 Meters and 2.18 meters).

In 1955 Land Rover answered this criticism by introducing the long wheelbase Land Rover, in pickup and station wagon versions. The wheelbase was stretched to 107 inches (2.71 metres), giving much more room in the load area. Oddly, the allowable load was initially exactly the same as the short wheelbase model, but the road limit was soon raised; possibly the springs were strengthened.

The 107 inch was stretched to the more familiar 109 inches later, the extra length being to accommodate a diesel engine which longer.

Making the Model

This model was made in the same way as the other four earlier ones in my ‘1:10 scale 4×4’ series. (use the site search feature and search for ‘big hand crafted’ if you wish to read Robert’s four previous articles). It is of mixed materials, to strict 1:10 scale, using whatever suits a particular part best. Or sometimes simply what I have available!

The chassis is of pinewood, and most of the body flat panels are in hardboard. The cab roof is aluminium sheet glued to a softwood block, while the bonnet lid was formed from nickel silver sheet – this is more rigid than aluminium but easier to work than steel.

Springs and much of the steering is of brass strips and tubes; some universal joints from radio-controlled cars were adapted to enable the front wheels to turn.

Rubber tyres are correct tread pattern, Dunlop ‘TRAK-GRIP’, a tyre actually fitted by the factory as an option on this model.

Seats are carved from softwood and covered in vinyl, obtained from a cheap handbag bought in a charity shop – with some funny looks from the assistant!

The many galvanised parts presented a problem. Only the cowling above the windscreen is real galvanised steel sheet. This is very realistic stuff of course, but is too hard to work. Instead I bought some bright zinc sheet and made it dull by a special chemical process. Other parts are painted in grey primer, which seems to match quite well.

The number plates and photo-etched Land Rover badges were bought from eBay suppliers, as were the rear lamps.

This model has 1,500 parts and took nearly a year to complete. It’s overall length is 18 inches (455mm).

The Result

Front Steering

 

The steering assembly test fit.

 

 

Details of the Damper

 

Rear Bodywork

 

Rear bed made of hardboard with sheet brass floor and plastic rubbing strips.

 

Tailgate is of aluminium and brass, superglued together.

 

The Interior

The doors do not hinge open but were made as separate parts. This gave access to build the model, and resulted in realistic gaps around the doors.

 

Views of the steering column, instrument panel, and gear and other levers.

 

Seats look as uncomfortable as the they are in the real thing!

 

More Views of the Cab

Showing the galvanised screen and the wipers.

 

Doors in place and all the galvanised strips showing clearly.

 

Doors shown in more detail with hinging shown even though doors do not hinge! But as can be seen a realistic gap can be created if doors are fitted separately.

General Views of the complete model

Model seen from front three quarter view .

 

Passenger side with exhaust winding its way underneath and mirrors standing high and proud on the front wing.

 

Drivers side with exhaust box and tail pipe and spare wheel clearly visible.
The Rear End

Cross member built-up of brass sections.

 

The Engine

The engine is fully-detailed. Bonnet stay is hinged like the real thing and works.

 

The Tailgate

Tailgate opens on chains, and the spare wheel can be removed from its bracket.

 

The Underside

 

The underside is fully detailed with all the transmission shafts, pedal linkages, springs and chassis sections modelled.

 

The Front End

A general view from the front. Note the strengthened hole in the front bumper to allow a starting handle to be used.

 

A view of number plate, grille and front lights as well as the Land Rover badges.

 

A detailed look at the front grille and headlights as well as the neatly made Land Rover badge.

 

The Wheels and Suspension

The wheels were modified by fitting the nuts and studs, among other changes.

 

The rear leaf spring and damper are shown above with the rear axle and prop shaft.

Rear Detailing

‘UO’ was a Devon registration. Number Plates include a realistic effect to suggest the raised letters used on 1950s plates. Reflector and rear light flank the plate.

The Completed  Model

All complete and ready for work!

Completed Model On Display

The fisherman, from eBay, sits in the rear of the finished model.

 

In a natural setting – the Rocky Mountains!

 


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Building a white metal kit of a Triumph TR250

By John F. Quilter

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

The small artisan business of K & R Replicas in Sandhurst, England produce a multitude of kits in white metal of all the popular Triumph (and MG and Austin Healey) sport cars. Just about every variation of Triumph sport cars is available, some with wire wheels, some with disc wheels, some with top up, some top down. Since my extensive collection of 1:43 scale Triumphs did not include the one year only US specification TR250, I needed to add this missing link to my progression of Triumph’s models. I ordered up the kit (KR130) from their website http://www.kandrreplicas.co.uk/ and within a few days I had the kit in hand. I chose the one without the targa rear window but that variation is also available. All the kits come with a fascia in LHD or RHD to suit. And I was impressed with the included decal for the stripe, and some of the badges that were TR250 specific.

Forty-third scale means the model is 43 times smaller than an actual car making it about 3.5 inches long. This international collecting scale is small enough for a collector such as myself to amass and display a virtual museum of automotive history. White metal is a sort of soft lead like material that is a favourite of small scale 1:43 scale model makers both in built form or in kit form. The kit comes with some chromed parts such as the bumpers and grill. Replicas of the stainless steel faux Rostyle wheel covers that were standard on all US TR250s are also included. I suspect you could request a set of wire wheels be substituted if wanted as many of the other kits come with wire wheels.

Building a white metal kit takes model builder’s skill and techniques, though there is an instruction sheet showing all the parts and some tips on how to complete the car. You will need a pin vice with some very small drill bits and a Dremel tool to drill out the mounting points for the door handles, both interior and exterior, the front parking lamps, the rear tail lamps and reversing lamps, etc. The mounting holes for the bumpers may have to be adjusted with a drill bit to get accurate positioning of these items. The same applies to the holes for the axles shafts to get the exact proper ride height and fore and aft positioning. Final positioning can be effected with a dab of J B Weld or equivalent epoxy metal. Some parts will need cleaning up with a small file to remove any casting flash. I begin by trial fitting everything after cleaning up the castings as needed. Tip: you will need a very small tweezers to hold some of the parts and do this in an area where if they (and they will) jump out of the tweezers to places unknown. Ask me how long I have spent looking for wayward parts on the floor! So have a very clean uncluttered work space.

Trial fit and trim the vacformed windscreen to the separate windscreen frame but do not fit it until after painting the frame. I wanted to do this car in Valencia blue a common colour from this TR250 period. I usually use rattle can Krylon paints but there was no colour matching Valencia blue. My solution to this was to take two shades of blue, dark and light, and a touch of dark green and mix them together in a small jar. Then using my Prevo sprayer (a sort of poor man’s airbrush) I simply sprayed on the custom colour. After fully drying I put a layer of Testors clear over the car for a high gloss look. Keep in mind that Testors clear is slow drying so set the painted body aside for at least 4 days before continuing the assembly project.

Since the wheels did not come chromed, I covered them with Bare Metal Foil chrome and touched in the black areas and lug nuts. The rubber tires provided in the kit are all black but as all Triumph fans know these cars came with red stripe tires as did the subsequent TR6. To create this effect I have perfected a new technique. I use some 28 gauge wire (available at Hobby Lobby or any hobby store or maybe hardware store) wind it around a round object such as a pen, Sharpie, or drill bit pull it tight and cut if off leaving a small ring of wire. Then lay out the four identical sizes rings and spray paint with red paint from a rattle can. When dry simply glue on to the tires as a final step in assembly.

The fascia piece will take some black paint on the top roll, brown on the face and black for the instruments. The grill piece is chromed to but to add realism it is necessary to “black wash” this piece to make the horizontal bars stand out from the background. Black washing is a modelers technique effected by mixing up some very thin flat back paint in say a bottle cap, and brushing it on whereupon it flows off the higher bars and settles in between bars area leaving a realistic appearance. Tail lamps are separate non chrome pieces so they get the Bare Metal Foil chrome treatment after being fitted then using clear red paint applied to the rear most surface. This gives an almost translucent lens appearance.

Much of the information on the details for building this car came from an original factory brochure and from a very thorough article on restoring a real car in Hemmings Sport & Exotic magazine January 2017 issue covering a car owned by Jim Whalen of Loudonville, New York.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Matrix’ New Racing Series

By Maz Woolley

All text by, and copyright of the Author. Photographs all supplied by the manufacturer.

Matrix has announced a new range of models called “Race Collection” with full details being available on their website at http://www.matrixscalemodels.com/ 

The initial release of models are all of cars driven by Sir Stirling Moss in the 1950s. All are made to 1:43 scale in resin and photoetched materials in China for Holland. All the models shown are pre-production samples which have been hand finished. The models are expected to be released September and October this year (2018).

MXR40108-011 Aston Martin DBR1 1000kms Nurburgring #1 winner Moss / Fairman 1959

Moss qualified fastest in this car but when Jack Fairman span the car and ended up in a ditch when overtaking an Alfa Romeo Guiletta it looked like it was all over. Amazingly Fairman pushed the car out of the ditch unaided and made it back to the pits for Moss to take over and get the car back up to first place in just three laps. The car went on to win the race.

 

MXR40108-012 Aston Martin DBR1 #7 Winner RAC Tourist Trophy Moss / Brooks 1958

Aston Martin had a good day at Goodwood in 1958 finishing 1-2-3! Moss and Tony Brooks lead home the field in this four hour race.

 

MXR40108-013 Aston Martin DBR1 #30 Second Silverstone Sports Car Race Stirling Moss 1959

A different story in 1959 as the Aston became less competitive. Moss struggled to meet the pace of the other cars and did very well to finish second to Ray Salvadori in a Cooper-Maserati.

 

MXR41311-011 Maserati 250F #28 Winner GP Monaco Stirling Moss 1956

Fangio may have been quicker in practice but Moss set of well and lead the race right until the end despite a heart stopping moment when he drove into the rear of Perdisa‘s car when braking for a corner.

MXR41311-012 Maserati 250F #1 Winner Goodwood Glover Trophy Stirling Moss 1956

Moss decided to drive the works car rather than his own for this race. Mike Hawthorn in a BRM lead from the line but Archie Brown and his Connaught took the lead for some time with Moss overtaking him and then running on to an easy win.

 

 

MXR41311-013 Maserati 250F #34 Third Grand Prix Belgium Stirling Moss 1956

A dramatic race although the Maserati could just not meet the pace set by the new Lancia-Ferrari driven by Fangio which won the race. Moss running an easy second then had a major mechanical breakdown as the rear half shaft and wheel seized and destroyed themselves.  Unlike today when an F1 driver would have been out of the race Moss could run back to the pits take over Pesari’s car and use it to finish third.


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News from the Continent June/July – Solido

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

All text by, and copyright of the Author. Photographs supplied by the Manufacturer

Solido models are diecast in China for France. Solido is part of the same group of companies as Schuco.

June 2018

1:18 Scale

S1800405 Citroen Acadiane “La Poste”

 

S1800903 Citroen Traction 11 CV

 

S1801106 Porsche 911 Carrera 2.8 RSR

 

S1800802 Subaru Impreza #5 Rally Monte Carlo 1995

 

S1800823 Alpine A110 1800S #1 Tour de Corse 1973

 

S1801501 BMW M3 Sports Evo black 1990

 

S1801502 BMW M3 saloon – red – 1986

 

1:43 Scale Models

 

S4302600 Bugatti T35B 1928 – blue

 

S4302700 Mercedes-Benz 190E saloon – 1984 – silver

 

S4302800 Renault Fuego 1982 – blue

 

S4302900 Simca Rally 2 1974 – yellow

 

S4303000 Jaguar D-Type 1952 – British Racing Green

 

S4303100 FIAT Panda 1990 – red

 

More SOLIDO 1:18

 

S1800305 Citroen Dyane 1974 – blue

 

S1800406 Citroen Acadiane “Michelin”

 

S1800506 Volkswagen Beetle 1303 SCCA Rally

 

S1800804 Porsche 911 SC Group 4 Rally dÁrmor 1979

 

S1801105 Porsche 911 RSR Sunoco 24 h of Daytona

 

S1801402 Fiat 500L 1969 – pink

 

421184670 Citroen 2CV6 “Cochonou”

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