Atlas Deluxe Dinky 525 Peugeot 404 Commerciale

By Maz Woolley

All text and photographs by, and copyright of the Author.

After a longer gap than usual the next car in the Atlas UK Deluxe Dinky series has been delivered. This is Dinky France #525 and is a model of the Peugeot 404 Commerciale. This is known to have been made in cream and blue in some numbers and as a rare Pompiers version in red which commands a large price premium. Luckily Atlas has decided to have the model made in blue with a red interior which I think suits it much better than cream. The model is made in China under license from Mattel who own the Dinky brand and is marked as 1:43 scale.

The 404 was styled by Pininfarina and launched in 1960 with the estate coming along in 1962 in three versions, Familiale, Break and Commerciale. The Family version had three rows of seats whereas the other two just had two rows and the Commerciale was designed to capture the commercial travellers market. There was a choice between two petrol engines of 1400 and 1500cc and a diesel of 1900cc. The 404 finally ended production in Kenya in the 1990s so it stood the test of time as a tough car, especially in places where rust was unlikely.

Rear seat folded

Rear seat upThe Dinky model is nicely reproduced. This model replaced the Peugeot 403 Estate which had been sold since 1959 in 1964. It enjoyed several neat features: the opening rear door will clip into the open position firmly holding the door open. The rear seat can be raised or lowered using a knurled wheels just ahead of the drivers side rear wheel. Some semblance of steering is provided but it is poor, to balance that it is fitted with Dinky France’s jaunty white tyres. The badging is moulded in in a  basic manner and there is no paint on door handles or other fitments other than bumpers, side lights and rear light surrounds. The headlights are yellow jewels which reflect what was originally fitted. All true to the illustrations I have seen of the original.

Comments on collectors bulletin boards show that some people are very disappointed with the Deluxe Dinky series and even if they like the models they don’t consider them special enough to match the original way the series was sold. I imagine subscriber numbers are falling jow,  especially when DeAgostini sell some of the models directly on their own web site.

Bulletin boards also reveal the fact that Atlas are closing series down all across Europe and are failing to provide all the models released in the series to later subscribers. There are many complaints about the Stobart and UK Dinky Truck Series which appear to be ended for some collectors without several models being supplied. UK wholesalers now seem to have substantial stocks of Atlas models from UK and Continental series so it does seem that the rumours that Atlas are closing down their sales of transport models may not be far from the mark.


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Two 1950’s Cadillacs in Photos

By  Mike DeTorrice

1955 Cadillac Fleetwood Series 60

This is the 1955 Cadillac Fleetwood Series 60 sedan, as done by Greenlight, in the 1/43 “Elvis” series of vehicles.  All snaps are taken in the suburbs of Chicago.

It’s really well done and certainly is a bargain at generally less than US$20.

This is the blue version, and a pink one is available as well.

1957 Cadillac Eldorado

This is a beautiful 1/43 Solido ’57 Cadillac that I got a great deal on at the Countryside show.  The snaps of the ’57 start in the suburbs of Chicago again, but after a long road trip, we ended up in San Diego!

These were made in both Seville and Biarritz forms.


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Amateur Building #2 – being a reconstruction of GFCC’s Austin 7 of 1930

By David Holcombe

Unless otherwise stated all text and photographs are copyright of the Author.

When Maz reviewed this little fellow in all its 1:43 glory (MAR Online, 31 Dec. ’17), he concluded that it “.. really would benefit from taking the model apart and treating it like a kit.” That’s when I decided it was time to find one for myself.

I acquired mine a couple of weeks ago (the postage from China was far more than I paid for the model); I had only pictures with which to compare, for I have never seen an Austin 7. But surely the staid English motorists of 1930 would not have used this green! So I turned to my long-suffering internet pals on Forum 43 and braced myself. Comments flowed, “Needs window glazing,” “like the postal slot in brass,” and from Master John Roberts, “different colour?”. One collector even posted his hot rod version. Horrors!

First, I made an attempt at just cleaning it up by touching the door handles and hub caps with silver/chrome, and adding a bit of pin striping. It still didn’t work. That green was just too green. So, I started with the conclusions of Maz and implemented the others as best as I could (where I agreed with them, anyhow). The model has two basic parts of die cast metal, being the cabin and the fenders/subframe. The rest, including a well-formed undercarriage, is plastic. The roof is also plastic, somewhat simplified. It appeared that the Austin was held together by two minute screws, but after removing them and the undercarriage, I found a third. Very small tabs, all plastic, tended to break as their glue gave way; but construction was so simple that they went back together rather easily.

The window glazing was relatively easy, working from the inside, as the metal of the cabin is quite nicely finished. That is, until I attempted the windshield (that’s “windscreen” in the UK). Sorry if a smear shows, but even my third attempt was faulty. I applied a light grey on the seats to ease all that black, and even picked out a little of the minimal dashboard. One of the guys who hangs around my models volunteered to drive, and he is still there.

Final touch-up was simple, as that’s the term for the Austin 7. My chosen dark red was advised by John Roberts, even though I found many, many shades of red in restored Austins. Chrome is only a touch here and there, and I had fun adding the pin stripe for a black on red contrast. That’s not paint; it’s a trimmed slice of the plastic striping I applied on my 1:1 PT Cruiser about 15 years ago. Never throw away something that you might need in the future. And, yes, I used a brass/golden tint on the postal slot. (I wonder if that is the correct term. Oh well, I like it and it seems to fit.)

If all this seems a lot of fuss over the very small car, then I suggest one of the several Austin 7 models that have been produced over the years. Oxford, I think, has one still in production. But none of them have just quite the same features as mine. (Big Smile!)

Picture from unknown source.

 

The 1:1 Austin 7 (sometimes referred to as the Austin Seven)

This is how it arrived, well packed but with no pretty box.

So I attempted a little work, but it still was too green! Time to “do a Maz!”

And so, we took it apart. And then I had fun!

And here it is now, on the streets of London, c. 1930. Okay, this driver found some pavement.

 

Here is how it looked in comparison to its English kin. That’s a Western Model’s version of the 1926 Rolls Royce Phantom 1 Doctor’s Coupe. And it’s a 2-passenger car. The Austin 7 was designed to handle four.

 

Sometimes it’s fun to take something apart and put it back together. . . kind of.

Yes these are both to 1:43 scale!


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News from the Continent – M4 Model Car Group March 2018

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

All photographs provided by the manufacturer.

All the models listed below are made in diecast metal to 1:43 scale in Italy unless otherwise stated.

ART Models

ART381 Ferrari 500 TR

Winner SCCA Laguna Seca 1957 – Pete Loylely #125

 

ART382 Ferrari 250 California LWB Spider America 1958 – red

 

ART383 Ferrari 860 Monza

3rd in Mille Miglia 1956 – Luigi Musso #556

 

ART384 Ferrari 625 LM

8th in GP Venezuela 1956 – Pierro Drogo #36

 

ART385 Ferrari 860 Monza

2nd in Mille Miglia 1956 – Collins/Klementaski #551

 

ART386 Ferrari 500 TRC

12 hours of Sebring 1957 – 1st in 2.0 litre class – Hively/Ginter #28

 

BEST Models

BEST9694 Lancia Fulvia F&M Special HF

Test car 1967 (new resin)

 

BEST 9695 Porsche 550 RS

Le Mans 1958 – 5th Godin de Beaufort/Linge #32

 

BEST9696 Jaguar E-Type Spyder

Elton John´s personal car.

 

BEST9697 Simca 1150 Abarth Rally 1963

 

BEST9698 Lancia Fulvia F&M Special HF

9th in Targa Florio 1969 – Munari/Aaltonen (new resin)

 

BEST9699 Ferrari 250 LM Spyder

Test car 1965

 

BEST9700 Ferrari 250 LM Spyder

Pernis von Innsbruck/Tirol 1965 – Heini Walter #2 first in class

 

BEST9701 Porsche 550 RS

2nd in Targa Florio 1959 – Mahle/Strähle/Linge #118

 

BEST9702 Ferrari 330 GTC 1966

light blue metallic

 

BEST9703 Porsche 908/02 Flounder

Interseries Norisring 1970 – Niki Lauda #39

 

Image of car – no model shot available
BEST9704 Abarth 2000 SE

Mont Ventoux 1969 – Arturo Merzario #49 – 2nd – 1st in its class

 

BEST9705 Alfa Romeo TZ2

Pergusa Jolly Hotel Rally 1965 – De Adamich/Lini #148

 

RIO Models

RIO4560 Fiat 238 Tetto Alto

Service Van Lancia Racing 1975-1977

 

RIO4561 Volkswagen Beetle with skis 1953

This is again a very strange looking model. This Beetle has an oval rear window from 1953, but lacks the quarter lights in the doors and has the bumpers of a 1948 car. In between the windscreen wipers  there are air intake slots like those fitted to the Beetle from 1968 onwards. The rear lights are round, in original it were oval to this time. The model has been put together with no regard for accuracy.

 

RIO4562 Fiat 1500 6C

Police 1950

 

RIO4563 Fiat 519

Italian Red Cross 1932

 

RIO4564 Fiat 128 Rally 1971

Green

 

RIO4565 Volkswagen Beetle 1200 De Luxe 1953

Bordeaux red

Once again a very strange looking model and unauthentic. Oval rear window from 1953, but no quarter lights fitted at that time.bumpers of a 1948 car. In between the windscreen wipers  there are air intake slots like those fitted to the Beetle from 1968 onwards. The rear lights are round, in original it were oval to this time. The model has again been put together with no regard for accuracy.

 

RIO4566 Fiat 18 BL truck 1918

Italian Army


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Collecting M&M Model and Toy Cars

By Jerry Broz

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

M&Ms, the round, button-shaped chocolate candies, originated in
the United States in 1941. Since 1980, the candy coated  chocolate candies have been sold across the world in more than 100 countries.

They are available in many different colors and in various flavors.
Through the years the M&Ms brand grew and this brought about
additional lines of merchandise produced under the M&M logo.
Early black-and-white TV adverts for the candies were featured as
the now world famous two, computer-animated, personified M&Ms
candy characters. Now there are hundreds of plastic, plush and stuffed candy characters, candy dispensers, figures, lamps, candy dishes, clock, ornaments, jewellery, pins, toppers to name just a few. For the collectors of items produced under M&M logo, there is even the M&M Collectors Club, Mars Candy’s sponsorship of NASCAR race cars with the M&M logo has led to the licensing of M&M logo and M&M liveried die-cast, resin, slot and plastic model cars and kits. This is in addition to an already well established line of toy cars, trucks, fire engines, motorcycles and airplanes. The six M&Ms personified spokes candy characters, the additional M&M lines of merchandise and, as well as, the toy cars have become popular collectables.

An interesting themed collection can be created from one or all of the following M&Ms model and toy cars.

M&M’s liveried Revell/Monogram Model Racing 1:32 scale
VW Fun Cup analog slot car, winner of 25 hours Spa 2010
Runs on all slot racing tracks.

M&M‘s liveried Spark 1:43 scale resin VW Fun Cup TDI
Spa 2009 and Kyle Bush Action Racing #18 M&M‘s
Caramel 1:64 scale die-cast Toyota Camry.

M&M‘s Racing Team, Motorworks Elliot Sander’s #38
NASCAR 1;32 scale Radio-Remote Control Ford, the likeness
of the same car is available in the 1;64 scale (pictured) and
in the 1;24 scale. The cars’  full functions features: Forward,
Reverse, Left/Right Turn, & Stop. Adjustable Front Wheel
Alignment, On/Off Switch,

M&M‘s one of the numerous pick-ups and trucks with a
various loads and equipment, driven by M character.

M&M‘s Police Car candy dispenser. Two police uniform
dressed M characters. The car features both a siren and
flashing lights on the roof.

M&M‘s Fire Engine Candy Dispenser with lights on top
and blaring siren imitating the real fire engine sound.
Expand and lift the ladder or push the button on the
side of the truck to activate the lights and siren. Red M
character is the driver with yellow aboard the ladder.

M&M‘s  “Under the Hood” yellow race car candy dispenser
with yellow and red M characters. This candy dispenser
was also produced in red as a Christmas gift.

Official M&Mâs Limited Edition Collectable Five Alarm Red’s
Firehouse Fire Truck Candy Dispenser. To fill the dispenser,
the top of the car is lifted. When pushing down on ladder,
the candies are dispensed. Red M character is the driver
with Yellow, in a firemans hat, on the back.

M&M‘s brown ceramic cruiser “Woody” with red and
green M characters. Woody is one of many ceramic cars
and ceramic car candy dishes, e.g., Halloween Hot Rod,
Red Convertible Sport Car, Limo Car, Blue “Fire 57”
Chevy convertible, etc., as well as a porcelain Valentine
Hot Rod. All driven by M characters.

M&M‘s NASCAR #36 race car collectible metal candy
container and, Volkswagen Love Bug collectible metal
candy can. Metal was also used for the M&M‘s lunchboxes.

M&M‘s Vintage Motorcycle with side car and a Blue M
character as a Patriotic Freedom Rider.

M&M‘s Vintage ‘90 yellow Hot Road race car jalopy
“Rebel without a Clue Cause” candy dispenser with red
and green M characters.

M&M‘s simple Radio-Remote Control toy car convertible
with a yellow M character as a driver. The drive system
(forward/reverse) operates independently of the steering
(left/right). Unfortunately, the car isn’t particularly fast.


 

The Essence of the Car – 2018 plans

By David Roots

All photographs provided by the Author.

The next four models to be released in the Essence of the Car range will be the cars described below. All have distinctive shapes which will suit the simple approach of this range of models made to 1:43 scale.

 

Mercedes Benz W129 540K.

The body, designed by Paul Jaray originally built for the 540 K Streamliner was designed to allow it to drive at high speeds for long periods of time and as efficiently as possible, and to that end it also incorporated a number of weight-saving technologies.

It was meant to compete in the Berlin-Rome race that never happened — WWII intervened. Powered by a 5-litre inline-eight helped by a supercharger, the car produced an impressive 180 hp.

 

Quantum V Sports Car.

The Quantum V was the last model designed by Walter Kern of Quantum Motor Cars in the United States 1965 and only one was produced. The Quantum V was manufactured using a modified Ginetta fibreglass body and used Saab mechanical parts.

 

Volkswagen Type 60K10

Also known as the Type 64, it is considered by many to be the first car from what was to become the Porsche company, and a true design precursor to the post-war production model. The model number comes from the fact that it was built mainly from design drawings for the Type 64 “record car”. Most mechanical parts came from the 1938 prototype series.

 

Ginetta G4.

Because the Quantum V used a modified Ginetta G4 fibreglass body. The natural progression will be to add this car to the collection.


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Dinky Supertoys Guy Vans

By  Terry Hardgrave

All photographs copyright by the author.

In 1949, Meccano introduced the first Dinky Supertoys Guy van, in the famous “Slumberland” livery. This was a most attractive model, finished in bright red paint, and featuring exquisite decals, in gold with black border, showing the company name as well as the Royal Crest of King George VI. Many think this is the most attractive of the 6 Guy vans made over a period of several years. This was in production from 1949 through 1951.

The second issue in the series was the “Lyons Swiss Roll”, made for only one year, 1952, so now quite rare and hard to find. Finished in a beautiful violet/dark blue, with more wonderful multi-colored decals, it makes a handsome model.

In 1953, Meccano released the third version of the Dinky Supertoys Guy Van, in the iconic “Weetabix” livery. Very rare and expensive! Mint, boxed examples can run over US$3000. For many serious, diehard Dinky collectors, this is the Holy Grail. After searching for several years, I settled for this one in very good condition, not quite up to my usual collecting standards.

The fourth van was in the “Spratt’s” livery and was one of more common, best remembered of this famous series, made from 1954 through about 1956.

Around 1956, the Guy Van in “Ever Ready” livery made its first appearance and was the fifth model in this series. As Ever Ready batteries were sold everywhere, this model got wide recognition.

Of the six Dinky Supertoys Guy Vans that were produced, maybe the most striking was the Robertson “Golden Shred”, also the last in the series.  If you want to know the history of the ‘Golly’ doll on the side of the van, see wiki or here.

All the Guy Vans were very popular, beloved models, made for several years in the 1950’s.  Many think that they and the Foden’s represent the best commercial models made by Meccano in that Golden Era of 1946-1960.


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Atlas Germany Ambulance Collection – Part Seven

By Hans-Georg Schmitt

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

The Atlas Ambulance Cars collection continues to be issued with two more items to 1:43 scale appearing since my last report.

7 495 114 Mercedes-Benz G-Class

On 1st February 1979 production of the Mercedes-Benz G-Class began in the Austrian city of Graz. The first Mercedes-Benz cross-country vehicle since the Second World War was developed in co-operation between Daimler-Benz and Steyr-Daimler-Puch which started in 1977.

The vehicle has since been used by businesses, private individuals, by utility firms, and for military purposes. Its suitability for off-road rescues because of its permanent four-wheel-drive.was identified early in its life.  Different rescue organisations are still using the G-class as emergency doctor´s cars today. The miniature shows an “Emergency Doctor Action Vehicle”, this means, that the doctor does first aid and prepares the patient for transfer to hospital by Ambulance and then moves on to the next call.

The model is true to the original shape and the livery is authentic. Many small separate parts are fitted and a baseplate with some detail fitted. The German registration plates are issued by Neustadt an der Waldnaab, not far away from the “Richard Wagner Town”, Bayreuth.

 

7 495 115 Saab 9-5 Sportcombi

In 1949 the Swedish aircraft manufacturer started their car production with the Saab 92. After many years with moderate success, the automobile production was sold to General Motors, who did not manage to grow the brand as they had hoped, and they sold Saab to the Dutch super sports car manufacturer Spyker who, under-capitalised and inexperienced in mass manufacturing, led the firm into insolvency in 2011.

The Saab 9-5 saloon was launched in 1997 and the estate appeared in 1999.

Outside major cities, Sweden is a sparsely populated country and so the emergency doctors often have long journeys to reach their patient. For this use the 9-5 estate was fitted as “AKUTBIL” with a huge range of medical equipment to help the Doctor cope with a wide range of emergency procedures.

The model is shaped accurately and the livery authentic and neatly printed. Many parts are small separately inserted ones. The baseplate has some detail. It is fitted with accurate Swedish registration plates.

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Countryside Weekend in Review!

By Randy Rusk

Editor’s Note:  Every March in the suburbs of Chicago, USA, a group of 1/43 collectors come together to meet face-to-face.  After all year reading MAR Online and interacting on various virtual groups like Forum 43, it’s very nice to meet in-person, socialize, buy and swap, and ‘talk toys’.  The guys (it’s all guys unfortunately) come from all over the US, Canada, and occasionally even the UK.   The weekend is very full with Friday dinner for early-birds,  BuzFest on Saturday, and Chicago deep-dish pizza that night.  Sunday morning is the Countryside Classic Toy Show where many of the 1/43 guys have tables.  Then we all head back home with our various purchases!


Here are my impressions from the Countryside weekend for those who weren’t able to make it.  After checking into the venerable Holiday Inn, I ventured off to BuzFest. Buz’ gracious “hostess with the mostest!” wife had a great spread of sandwiches, snacks and desserts out – but I was saving myself for the deep dish pizza that was to come. More on that in a minute.

There was already a solid group of guys in the room when I got there, full of tales about models they recently acquired – or were about to:

But what stopped me in my tracks – and had me immediately reaching for my wallet – was the surprise arrival of a new Conquest woody, the 1959 Mercury Colony Park Station Wagon in red, black or white (with or without roof rack):

These came in just a day earlier from overseas so the timing was perfect. I nabbed the red one.  Several others snapped them up as well.  Regardless of the model that weakened your knees, Buz was very happy to get us into that next new car:

With stories shared and money spent, it was off to Giordano’s for Chicago-style deep dish pizza. A big thanks to Frank for once again coordinating a good meeting space with hot pizza at a great price.

And while you might look at these pics and wonder why no one is smiling, it’s because they all took their pizza consumption very seriously! With lighter wallets and full bellies, it was time to retire to the hotel for a fresh start in the morning.

Sunday was bright and sunny and felt like it was at least 20 deg F warmer – a very good sign. Another good sign was the long line waiting to get into the toy show.

Now, normally I’m not a big fan of crowds, but for the future of our hobby, it was really nice to see a big turnout of avid collectors pouring over the tables.

Word on the street is that they were all lining up to see John’s latest pink and green masterpiece in model making excellence:

OK, well, maybe not so much, but it was great to see all the dealers who support our hobby out in force with lots of great stuff to buy.  You might spot Automodello in the collage below.

Finally, at the Forum table, our thanks to Esval for sending several boxes of models, as well as to Sergio for a sneak peek of prototype samples of some of his latest offerings from Goldvarg. That newest woody (top left) is a must-have for me:

Well, all in all, it was a great time to catch up with old friends and new models. I always think of this show as the first sign of spring… and with the mix of scale models viewed (and purchased) over the two days, I can’t wait to see what the rest of 2018 holds!

I hope everyone made it home safely and I look forward to seeing you all again next year. A shout out to Dick Browne, our fearless leader at Forum 43.  I hope all is well and that we’ll see you all back in Chicago in 2019.


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An Amateur Builder #1 – Western Models 1936 SS Tourer

By David Holcombe

All text and photographs by, and copyright of the Author unless otherwise stated. 

Amateur– “Participating in an activity for pleasure, not as a job; from the French ‘lover of’.” “Unpaid performer.” “Not qualified as a professional.”

Well, that’s me, plus add over seventy-five years of enjoying without becoming expert. But I have had fun in the process. Here’s just a taste:

Around 1973 Mike and Joyce Stephens started a little company to produce white metal model cars in both kit and built forms. By the 1980’s, their Somerset, England, firm had over thirty employees and were building under their own Western Models name and also for Motor City USA and other companies. Chinese competition cut their success and they became a smaller firm. They retired about 2007 and sold their firm, which now produces mostly plastic airplane models.   (Editor’s note:  Their 1/43 American model cars were bought by an American firm and are now sold as detailed handbuilts!) But for several years, the Stephens’ Western Models, in both 1:43 and 1:24, were admirable projects for amateur builders.

This is one of them, Number 43, the 1936 SS1 Tourer, probably produced in the early 1980s. Its 1:1 master was built in the mid-1930s by SS Cars Ltd., perhaps at that time better known as the old Swallow Sidecar Company and later as Jaguar. I bought it on eBay for less than 20 US Dollars.

Buying models on the secondary market (that means “used” or at least “previously owned”) can be risky. These parts can be small, tiny, miniscule, and all that means “easily lost.” This one I found in sealed envelopes, but somehow by the time of final assembly one door handle was missing. I fashioned a replacement and it seems okay. After all, one can’t see both sides of the model at the same look.

The other term to consider is “file to fit.” Remember, no matter how many files you have, from a Dremel tool through smaller and smaller files right down to your wife’s fingernail equipment, you still won’t have one that is exactly right. Sometimes it’s “make do with what you have.”

If you’re in a hurry, avoid white metal models. Go find a plastic Heller product and enjoy construction without filing. I recently finished a Heller 1:43 Citroen 11CV and had a lot of fun with it. Well . . . I may have touched it a little with sandpaper a time or two.

Keep an eye out for special features, and also for special problems. This Western SS has some of the best looking wheels I have ever used. They are almost jewelry. I buffed them a little with the Dremel’s soft brush and then mounted them. I also added a driver, probably an Arttista but I’m not sure. Getting him under the wheel was another “file to fit” chore. And fitting the windshield? Right now, after all the photography, the model is out on the desk with no windshield, waiting for yet another fitting. In one of the pictures, I noticed a gap where the body’s rear side panel meets the rear fender. Yep. It’s there. I tried to readjust it with the rear screw, but it doesn’t happen. This one I will live with.

Finally, develop a thick skin. There’s nothing like a combination of zoom lenses, enlarged pictures, and collectors who buy 200-dollar models assembled by the nimble fingers of people who grew up with chop sticks to point out flaws in your completed final product. Remember: building white metal models in 1:43 scale is fun. That’s the mantra to keep mumbling while down on the floor hunting for that door handle.


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