Suddenly it’s 1960 (A little later then planned)

By Graeme Ogg

All text and photographs are by, and copyright of, the Author unless otherwise stated.

Upper Photograph is from an Anonymous source on the Internet. Lower is the Author’s Handiwork

A few years ago I got hold of a Brooklin Models 1960 Edsel convertible and in one of those moments of rash enthusiasm decided to scratchbuild an estate roof on to it to make a Villager wagon, which would fill a gap in my Edsel collection. This was a rare bird (only 275 built before Ford finally pulled the plug on Edsel production) which essentially shared the 1960 Ford body, and I found the wagon roofline particularly attractive. Unfortunately I ran into problems with the build and chickened out (it’s a long, sad story) and set the whole thing aside. For about 5 years.

Meanwhile, fellow chopper John Quilter took the sensible approach to building his own Villager by making resin castings of the Brooklin bumpers and grille and fitting them into the Ixo body. I could have done the same, but clung to the idea I could make my Brooklin conversion work. Then along came the Ixo 1960 Ford wagon. I bought a couple of them and found that the roof was a remarkable good fit for the half-demolished Brooklin body.

 

After carefully sawing it off the Ixo body I glued it in place and it only needed a touch of filler here and there to blend it into the lower body. The rear fins on the wagon, curving their way around the tail-lights, differ from both the Edsel sedan and the Ford wagon, so those had to be fabricated. After that it was only (hah!) a matter of tidying and detailing.

I had kept the Brooklin seats but the Ixo seating unit sat better in the “blended” body so I used that, but tarted up the seats a little to make them look more like the Edsel upholstery pattern.  I replaced the Ford wheels with the Brooklins.

The Edsel wasn’t exactly lacking in brightwork, so a fair bit of work was needed with the Bare Metal Foil. I was going to foil the grille and bumpers but they looked bright enough to match the BMF so I left them alone, although I did drill out the metal headlamps and front sidelights and fitted plastic lenses, which brightened up the front quite nicely.

I also remembered to add the “gunsights” on the front corners that weren’t originally fitted to the Brooklin.

And that would have been it, really, except that when it came to the knee-trembling stage of final detailing and re-assembly, my nerve went again, and the model just sat there unfinished. However, in the past few weeks I finally got my whatsit back into gear and completed the job.

Of course (as a country barmaid once confessed to me) when you start fooling around with the country squire[*] it can be hard to stop. Pretty soon I was attacking another Ixo wagon. I’ve always admired the styling of the 1960 big Fords but only have a very warped plastic Galaxie (Anguplas) and a Starliner coupé (Motorhead Miniatures) in my collection, so I launched into a sedan conversion. For some reason I found the particular variation of the “Thunderbird” roofline used on the 1960 Galaxie less convincing than on some other Fords of that era, so switched my attention to the Fairlane 500 Town Sedan, with its slimmer rear pillars and huge back window (interesting that in 1960 Ford, GM and Chrysler all featured outsize “bubble” rear windows on some models).

While Ixo kindly provided a suitable lower body and roof structure, the whole back end had to be changed, with a new rear deck and the cropped fins of the wagon extended forwards and inwards, and the boot lid that sits lower than the rear wings, with the centre of the rear window dropping down into the valley. After more than 5 years without laying hands on an X‑Acto blade or a needle file, it was an interesting exercise in reviving old skills. (Skills? Surely you jest.)

I did at least successfully revive the old trick of carving the rear window in balsa and push-moulding it into heated plastic, with only minor charring of some domestic furnishings, although I did have to take the batteries out of the smoke detectors. And the moulding came out pretty well in the end.

The distinctive chevrons on the rear flanks were snipped from small staples. Fairlane 500s had a crest on the nose rather than “Ford” script, so that was done with a tiny colour photocopy. I put “Fairlane” on the boot lid in proper 1:43 lettering and it was pretty much invisible, so I went for over-scale lettering which may have been a bad idea (not helped by the elderly decal sheet having yellowed somewhat) but I wasn’t going to scrape it all off. Since I can’t print badges in chrome or white, I put “Fairlane 500” script on the front wings in black, which sounds like another daft move but if you look at photos of real cars the script is often half in shade and could almost be black …. OK, don’t believe me. At least it gives the impression that there’s a badge there.

The grossly over-scale chrome gunsights used by Ixo were replaced by something a little more delicate.

Building working steering into a model that will just sit on a shelf was a spectacularly pointless exercise and I don’t know what possessed me. (In retrospect, I think it was a bit of displacement activity at a tricky moment in the build.)

The Ford was done at the same time as the Edsel, and sat around unfinished for just as long, so I am just glad to get these models completed at last. It has to be said that doing a decent paint job, applying BMF tidily and putting small pieces of trim back neatly are all things that benefit from regular practice, so after the long lay-off this was not my finest hour in those areas. Close up, there are too many raggedy details, and after spending so long trying to get things right, it’s a little discouraging (said he, apparently calm but inwardly fuming). Of course I don’t plan on letting you get that close. Just stand back and enjoy the general impression. No, a bit further.  Further.  That’s it.  Nice, eh?

And here it is alongside an original Ford brochure photo.

Upper Photograph from period Ford Brochure, lower the Authors Handiwork.

[*] OK, so the Ixo is officially a Ranch Wagon, not a Country Squire. Listen, if you’re going to be difficult ….


 We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Auto World Plymouth 1:64 Models

By Maz Woolley

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

Auto World is both a US store and a manufacturer producing models under Auto World, Johnny Lightning, and Racing Champions brands. Models cover multiple scales and even include HO scale slot cars. In 1:64 there is a difference between Johnny Lightning and Racing Champions models (made under licence from Tomy who no longer make them) and Auto World ones. Johnny Lightning continue as they have always done with models of American vehicles with fat speed wheels and some custom finishes to give them on the peg appeal at a pocket money price. Racing Champions seem to have a less clear cut identity with prices similar to AW and some features like wing mirrors that AW models lack but slightly less detailed models in some cases. Auto World was created with the collector of classic American vehicles in mind and is a series stated to be to strictly to 1:64 scale and which is finished in realistic colours, with realistic wheels and fitments, and well printed detailing. Its main competitor is probably Castline’s M2 ranges. In my eyes Auto World tend to look rather more realistic than M2 because they do not include the opening doors which detract from many M2 models.

Here I look at two new AutoWorld models which are recolours on existing castings and which I think show how collectable US 1:64 models have become.

AutoWorld 1964 Plymouth Barracuda                  Vintage Muscle Series release 4b #3

Aware that Ford intended to use its compact Falcon as the basis for a sporty car other manufacturers started to design their own. Chrysler created a fastback design based on their new compact Plymouth Valiant. The large rear window was the largest producer for a production car at that time.  Engine and gearbox options were the same as the Valiant’s, including two versions of Chrysler’s slant-6 engine. The highest power option for 1964 was Chrysler’s all-new 4.5 Litre V8.

Though the Barracuda was launched two weeks before the Mustang it only sold 23,443 units in 1964 compared to Ford’s 126,538 Mustangs.

The styling influence lived on with the large rear window being a key feature of the Chrysler owned Sunbeam Rapier and Alpine 1750 Arrow cars.

The casting captures the shape of the car well. The printed chrome round the windows is well done as is the rear window surround and fuel filler.

Good wheels have the smaller white sidewalls that emerged in the early 1960s.

From the front the grille is neatly moulded in and then black washed and all the chrome printed. The lights are printed in white which is quite effective and seems to be becoming popular on US 1:64 scale models. Even the moulded in wiper arms are neatly over printed in silver.

That huge rear window and all its fittings are nicely caught. Rear lights are printed on with silver base over printed with light lenses. An effect which is acceptable in this scale.

The rear scripts and boot fittings are all printed very finely and all is topped off by a registration plate though there is none fitted on the front.

Some attention has been paid to the engine bay which appears to house the optional V8.

AutoWorld 1958 Plymouth Belvedere                    Classic Chrome series release 4b #2

This casting has been seen before in several colours and in the special movie related “Christine” model from the film based upon Stephen King’s book.

The Belvedere modelled here is the version sold from 1957 to 1959 at the height of the era of Fins as styling statements. The design was so forceful Chrysler advertising was under the strap line  “Suddenly, it’s 1960!” In 1958 the Belvedere was the top trim level and was available with a large V8 engine called the Golden Commando.

The profile of the car with its jet fins has been nicely captured and the side ornamentation printed well right down to the door handles and the Belvedere badging which can only read clearly if you enlarge photographs of the model.

The wheels and tyres are modelled well though a black wash on wheels might make them look more realistic.

The front grill and huge bumper are well modelled and this time a number plate is included though it only carries the legend Belvedere. In the centre of the grille the V sign is picked out in gold. The bonnet emblem is printed over a raised moulding and even has a tiny Plymouth script printed on it much too small for the naked eyes to read clearly.

From the rear the excellent printing on the lights, huge bumper, and even the tiny Plymouth script along the lip of the boot, are all clearly visible.

Finally we get the view under the bonnet which clearly houses a large V8 engine painted gold as one imagines that the Golden Commando would have been.

Two nice models of classic American cars.


 We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Model Auto Review 1988 Part Two

By Maz Woolley

We are sorry for the long gap in this series of articles this was caused by the fact that the way that we had been preparing them was very time intensive and was starting to squeeze out other content we felt needed to be posted. So from this posting on we will be posting colour pages and contents details but minimising the analysis of the content. 

This is the eighth in a series of articles looking at each year’s output of the original Model Auto Review magazine.   In October 2017 we reviewed the first half of 1988 so this month we look at the second half from the Summer Extra through to the Christmas Edition.  We show you the Cover and Contents pages of the magazines and some colour pages to give a flavour of what the magazine looked like. (Click on the images to get a larger copy.)

What was happening at MAR in 1988?

1988 saw an increase in the number of pages in MAR including the inclusion of colour centre pages which would be an ongoing feature. Expert contributors were now contributing regularly and the magazine was now established and developing a worldwide circulation.

What a year 1988 was!

The summer hits of the US and UK were as usual completely different. Over in the US “Roll With It” by Steve Winwood was the biggest summer seller whilst in the UK it was Yazz and the Plastic Population’s “The only way is up”.

In cinema a few classics hit the screen in 1988. That included the award winning Rain Man and the first of the Die Hard films which were to become a profitable series for 20th Century Fox. In the US it would have cost you about 3.5 Dollars to see the films and just over 90 cents a gallon to put fuel in the car to drive there.

In the computer world the IBM PC was a popular choice and one with a  30 Megabyte Hard Disk, Mono Monitor and 512K Memory would have cost 1,249 US Dollars.  If you fancied a new car instead a Ford Taurus started at around 9,996 US Dollars or you could go compact and buy a Volkswagen Rabbit (Golf) for 7,104. 

Around the world:

  • the Iraq-Iran war ended after 1.5 million people had died
  • A BA Jumbo Jet was blown up over Lockerbie in Scotland by terrorists
  • In England the pound note was replaced by a coin
  • In Poland Solidarity were starting their strikes.
  • In Afganistan the Soviet government withdrew their troops

#33 Extra 88 August/September

Front Cover

Inside Front Cover
Contents

Sample of Middle Pages

Inside Rear Cover

Rear Cover

#34 Autumn 88 October/November

Front Cover

Inside Front Cover

Content

Sample from Middle Pages

Inside Rear Cover

#35 Christmas 88 December/January

Front Cover

Inside Front Cover

 

Contents Page

Inside Back Cover

Back Cover


 We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Old Dinky Toy Lorries

By Terry Hardgrave

In the pre-WWII days of diecasting, many Dinky Toys, especially trucks, were a blend of several makes that resulting in nice looking models. However, these were impossible to link to a particular manufacturer.

My first example of this is the 22c Motor Truck, first made around 1936, discontinued in 1941, then re-introduced in 1946 for a few more years.

Many ardent collectors have tried searching for a matching prototype, such as a Bedford, to no avail. Headlights, which were separate fixtures in those days, were especially difficult to model, so in some cases, Meccano simply left them off. This particular model is a very, very early 1946 issue, as it is still using the pre-war style white tires, the smooth, non-ridged black wheels, and the use of black fenders.

The next one is another very early post-war model from around 1945, of the 25s 6 Wheeled Covered Wagon. This model was first introduced around 1938, in a military version as the 151b Transport Wagon, and is a somewhat generic design, based on a couple of English trucks from that era. The reason I know it is from 1945:  the smooth, non-ridged black wheels, and the very lightly treaded tires… a pre-war item. They used up leftover stock for a very short time after production resumed in 1945.

About the earlier military version, one of the 1938 issues of the “Meccano Magazine”  stated that this model was “based on several vehicles made in the 6 wheel configuration for the government”.  Dinky collectors have found many different photos of similar military transport wagons of that era.  Two of the closest may be a Leyland Terrier (photo) or a Crossley (photo).

Even though these little models have no true identity, I still love the look and charm of a bygone era…..


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

The Volvo 265 Estate in 1/43

The 1976-81 Volvo 265 Estate
The Rapid Transit System for Families with Class

by Frank Koh

It was the top-of-the-line Volvo station wagon of its era, and the first-ever Volvo estate powered by a six-cylinder engine. As the flagship of the 240 series estate fleet, most 265 models were heavily-optioned to justify their upscale yet no less utilitarian character. Unfortunately, the 2.7 liter “Douvrin” V6 that Volvo shared with the Peugeot 604 and Renault 30 TS highline models was plagued with lubrication issues that often led to premature valve train failure. Coincidentally that same engine was used in the ill-fated DeLorean sports car. While the Volvo 240 series remained in production thru 1993, the rare and desirable 265 was phased out when the all-new Volvo 760 GLE Estate debuted in 1982.

Leather interior and “Corona” alloy wheels were two popular options that most Volvo 265 variants were equipped with. Only the contemporary limited edition Volvo 262C Bertone coupe was more expensive than the 265.

Atlas Editions

Even Volvo 265 model miniatures are rare.  This black 1/43 scale diecast is from the Europe-only Volvo Atlas Editions line and could be obtained only by subscription a few years ago.  Even today, it seldom turns up on the secondary market.  Aside from this Atlas Editions 265, the only other genuine Volvo 265 model miniatures are the vintage Norev 1/43 scale wagon erroneously labeled as a “264” sedan (the Norev wagon and sedan use the same baseplate) and the even older Dinky Volvo 265 DL Estate in 1/36 scale, one of my all-time favorites.

The raised leading edge of the”Coffin Nose” hood and exclusive grille of the 264 sedan and the 265 wagon (used also in some early-to-mid eighties North American-spec 240 four cylinder models) exuded elegance and power. The less expensive four cylinder Volvos from this range had a flat hood and less chrome on their grilles.

The Atlas Edition Volvo models came with a really cool black plinth that featured a separate plastic chrome Volvo emblem. Unfortunately, the Atlas Volvos did not come with their own clear acrylic cases.

Dinky Toys

This is the COMPLETE line of Dinky Toys Volvo 265 DL Estate variants, produced from around 1977 thru 1979 when the original Dinky Toys entity owned by Meccano Ltd. went out of business. All the Dinky models in this pic were made in England, except two, namely the orange civilian car in the center and the white police car on the extreme right, which were made in Italy because the Dinky Binns Road factory in the U.K. had closed down by then.

Norev

In the late seventies/early eighties Norev of France came out with a 1/43 scale Volvo 264 sedan, and soon after a Volvo 265 wagon variant was released. The latter was erroneously labeled also as a “264” because both sedan and wagon used the same “Volvo 264” baseplate. While most of these vintage Norev pieces were made in France, this particular example has a baseplate that says “Made in Portugal”. Strange indeed. This is the only Norev model I know of that was made in Portugal.

My Own Car

This Atlas Editions, Dinky Toys, and Norev are joined in this topic by another Volvo wagon,  my personal 1:1 scale Volvo 240 wagon, a 1992 U.S.-spec 5-speed manual car named Queenie.  My wife likes the car because its lack of performance keeps me out of trouble!

If you notice the #409 Wine Red Metallic Dinky in the photo above,  it is customized with the same paint as my car in the background.  We used the same paint to re-shoot Queenie last year.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Readers Letter – Greenlight Window fixings

Greenlight Window Fixings

What is your verdict on the way Greenlight has attempted to engineer flush side windows on the 1939 Chevrolet vans?

I don’t care for the engineering solution. Flush glazing yes, but not at the cost of overall appearance. Thinner wall castings getting windows closer to where they should be like Matchbox did some 55 years ago is still better in my mind!

Robin Godwin
Canada
via eMail

Editor: I didn’t mention this in the article on these models, to be found here, as I only looked closely at it when Robin drew it to my attention. But he is right the fixing is extremely clumsy and when the model is in a light colour it is also very obvious as shown in photographs below where arrows point to new fixings intruding visually. The flush fittings being increasingly used by PCT/Sonic and Oxford with the side glazing being fitted into side from inside with all frames printed on is vastly superior. Or as Robin says if the casting is fine enough then the gap is scarcely noticeable anyway. I hope GL find a better solution for future castings. What do you think?


 We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Greenlight 1939 Chevrolet Panel Van

By Maz Woolley

Text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author. 

Greenlight have released the Chevrolet Panel van from 1939 in 1:24 and 1:64 scale across a number of their ranges all with attractive liveries. Like Models of Yesteryear there is no discernible differences between them other than their liveries. In 1:24 there are some opening parts but there are none in 1:64 scale which improves accuracy even if it reduces play value. The models are diecast in China for the USA.

In 1:64 scale there are liveries for Goodyear Tyres and Shell Petrol in series four of  “Running on Empty“.  In the “Blue Collar Collection” series three they sell Chevrolet Parts and Krispy Kreme liveried vehicles, there is a picture on the web of a Krispy Kreme van looking very like a 1939 Chevy but in a different livery to the one used by Greenlight. Like all Greenlight 1:64 scale models these are more expensive than Mattel Hot Wheels but cheaper than Auto World or M2.

The 1939 Chevrolet Panel Van was a functional vehicle with a car like look and was replaced in 1941 by a van with a waterfall front end only seen on vans. This van, new for 1939, was sold under the strap lines “The Nation’s Largest Builder of Trucks” and  “Quality Makes Volume – Volume Makes Price”.

Chevrolet Parts Model 1:64 Blue Collar Series release 3

The van has a good shape and captures most of the features of the original quite well though the way the lights are inset in silver blocks to the side of the radiator is an inelegant solution. The Tampo printing of the areas of blue is not as thick as it might be and there are small gaps in the paint here and there betraying the fact that these are made to a strict budget. On the plus side the livery is nicely printed and seems to match printed material of the time.

The light lenses being picked out in white is a nice touch and the grille is good enough though some black wash would be nice. Number plates are printed. The windshield is a bit of a let down. All the glazing is flush but the printed chrome surround at the base of the window is much too high and large.

The wheels and tyres are well modelled though the tyres seem slightly too wide and square shouldered for the period.

To the rear the curved panels are very evident and the rear light, number plate and livery is all well done. The rear door handle is picked out, though the photograph doesn’t show it. Sadly the paint splits at all the panel lines on the vehicle, again showing that these are painted quickly and with minimal materials in the factory to meet the selling price.

Goodyear Model 1:64 Running on Empty Series release 4

Great colours reflect the corporate colours of the period. Sadly the blue overspray does not wrap round wheel arches underneath and there are a few dots of yellow where the blue paint has not covered the yellow.

The blue wheels are neatly painted and show off the contrast with the hub cap well though they are a bit shiny for a working van.

From the front all my comments about the Chevrolet liveried van apply but here the front bumper, which is straight and level on the parts model shown above, is bent like a banana which shows that QC is not very strict.

The front windscreen differs as well. Here there is no chrome print at the base and the window looks all the better for it. Sometimes less is best.

Finally to the rear the finish is as good as the Parts van and the yellow has split less round panel lines too. One other difference between the vans is the silver coach line which is nicely printed along the side of the Goodyear liveried van.

I am sure that we will see many more of these vans in different liveries. Some like the Texaco one that I am sure will come, they already do it in 1:24, I will welcome. Whilst others will inevitably be printed in pretty but inaccurate liveries which I will not .


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Maserati Kyalami 1976

By Maz Woolley

All text and photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

From time to time models from Italian part works turn up on eBay and at toy fairs. When they do they often offer a good budget model for a modest price. The model this article focuses on is a 1:43 scale Maserati Kyalami issued as part of an Italian part work by Leo Models of Italy but made in China for them. Leo Models specialised in preparing a range of masters for part works and budget ranges  though the web site quoted on the model is no longer responding so this cannot be confirmed.

Excess stock from the Maserati part work series has been made available through wholesalers in the UK over the last few years, though not all the cars available to subscribers appear to have been made available on the secondary market. The standard of the models is variable but the Kyalami is very good.

The Kyalami is a four seater coupé produced by Maserati from 1976 to 1983. It was named after the Grand Prix circuit in South Africa where a Cooper-Maserati won the Grand Prix in 1967

This was the first model developed after Alejandro de Tomaso bought the company and it was derived from, and mechanically similar to, the the Longchamp a three-box grand tourer made by De Tomaso AutomobiliPietro Frua was commissioned by De Tomaso to turn the Tom Tjaarda-designed Longchamp, into a Maserati. The interior was also upgraded to incorporate classic Maserati elements such the steering wheel and instrumentation. Thankfully the Maserati V8 was used and not the American-sourced Ford V8 which was used in the Longchamp. The same styling found its way to the larger Maserati Quattroporte which shared the same running gear as the Kyalami. The fact card in the part work is completely wrong in its statements about the engine which is described as a 6 cylinder 1488cc unit. Clearly the quality control in pre-production was non-existent!

The model captures the shape well. Hints of the Lancia Beta, and even the Fiat 130 coupé in the styling perhaps? It is certainly a clean design with typical late 70s mixture of boxiness and sculpted sides.

The wheels and tyres are accurate if a little bland.

The front end is well modelled with the grille and lights very neatly done and the multi part front bumper with embedded indicators and sidelights nicely moulded and printed. However, a little red paint on the trident would have made it even better.

The windscreen wipers are fine mouldings and better than the Photoetch ones on many dearer models.

Inside the model a pale blue matt finish suggests the leather sets and door cards. The dashboard has instruments moulded in but is all black.

To the rear the missing number plate is annoying. Again the lights are very well made separate units, the multi-part bumper is well modelled. The chrome strip and name badges has been printed so finely it is only obvious how fine when you blow up the photograph of the model.

The glazing for this vehicle is excellent. Flush fit all around the car is shown with an open drivers window.

All in all a very nice part work model of a vehicle from a period when styling was considerably different to the styling we see today.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Autopioneer – Correction

By Maz Woolley

Thorsten Sabrautzky of Autopioneer has been in touch to point out that his new range of models is made in Europe, but not in Germany as I stated in the recent article. I have updated the original articles and apologise for any confusion my error may have caused.


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.

Autopioneer – Made in Europe

By Maz Woolley

All photographs are supplied by, and copyright of, the manufacturer.

Autopioneer is a new range of models made to 1:43 scale in resin with white metal and photo-etched fitments. They intend to release a model every two months going forwards. However, unlike many similar ranges specialising in glamorous coach built cars from the past it is not built in China, but in Europe.  Each model will remain unique as they will not appear again in other colours and only 50 of each model will be made. This means that the models are expensive as well as exclusive.

Like Matrix, AutoCult and others Autopioneer only intends to announce each model shortly before it becomes available in the hope that the model will not be copied by others and spoil sales.

This article covers the second model made in this range which is a Hooper bodied creation on a 1947 Rolls-Royce Silver Wraith chassis made for Nubar Gulbenkian. Guilbenkian  was a playboy tycoon who lived at the Ritz Hotel in London. His money came from the family’s oil business – it owned five percent of BP‘s stock. He liked big, fast and expensive cars and developed a taste for Rolls-Royce cars. All his Rolls-Royces were coach built to his own suggestions for design and were extravagant in style and luxurious in fitment.

The car modelled was the first of his flamboyant Rolls-Royces and was based on a 1947 Silver Wraith chassis. There was a
traditional sliding Deville extension over the chauffeured compartment – a recurrent theme on his cars. All windows were electrically operated. There were no sweeping, but flush,
door handles which were not visible from the outside to support the streamline shape. It is said that deeply conservative Rolls-Royce was not very happy with the car and that the English coachbuilder Hooper had no desire to give his name in connection with the Rolls-Royce Silver Wraith, but both needed the business.

The car is coloured in the corporate colours of Gulbenkian’s firm after the pictures of the car which is currently undergoing restoration in the UK.

The photographs below show a well modelled representation of the original vehicle finished to a high level of detail.

The arrival of another entrant into this sector of the market means that collectors of unique coachbuilt cars have an even wider choice of models to collect – if they can afford them!


We welcome your comments and questions.   Please go to our Model Auto Review Facebook page or email the Editors at maronlineeditor at gmail.com.