Big Hand Crafted Four by Fours – Part Two

By Robert Gunn

Readers of MAR magazine will have been familiar with Robert’s contributions as an expert on pickup trucks. Since retirement he has been making a selection of 4×4 vehicles by hand which he will share with us over a series of articles. All photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

The Models

The models are hand made to 1:10 scale. Each is a unique creation and when finished is displayed on a modelled plinth in a clear cabinet. Here we look at the second of my models the Toyota Land Cruiser FJ25 from 1958.

How the models are made

All have a softwood chassis of pine or deal. Most body sides are tempered hardboard, as are the floors, but bonnet lids are metal – either aluminium or or nickel-silver sheet. Rounded corners are of timber beading, usually hardwood. Small details are made of anything which suits from my huge boxes of bits – parts of old pens, pieces of metal or plastic, nuts and bolts, tubes and so on. Sticks of solder are good to file into manifolds, carburetors and similar. Windscreen frames are either brass sheets and strips, or latterly in sheet polystyrene plastic.

Parts which I can’t make are brought-in, such as wheels, tyres, mirrors, lights, and badges.

Glues used vary from white PVA (Woodworking Glue) through super glue, Scotch glue and others. “JB Kwik” two pack epoxy is also very useful stuff – a combined glue and filler.

Part Two – Toyota Land Cruiser FJ25 1958

Like Rover in the UK Toyota were a company with a strong engineering heritage from power looms onwards. By the 1950s they too had seen the need for a sturdy utility vehicle with “go anywhere”  capabilities. Indeed they were asked to build some Jeeps for the US military during the Korean War. The Land Cruiser series were Toyota’s equivalent to the Land Rover built in various configurations to meet a multitude of requirements.

FJ 25 pedals and gear levers depicted in great detail.

Completed FJ25 model shown on a turntable diorama with Sarah the farm girl. The figure started life as Jennifer Lawrence as “Katniss” in the Hunger Games, re-clothed by the Author.

This is the basic body: tempered hardboard and sheet metal bonnet in nickel silver. The bonnet was very hard to make.

The windscreen frame: all made from brass.

Trial assembly painted with primer coat. As well as checking the fit of the parts test assembly helps keep up enthusiasm on a long and complex project.

Toyota rear bumper, bolted together just like the real (steel) one.

Toyota spare wheel carrier, pinned and screwed from solid brass.

Toyota seats – Imitation leather from a charity shop handbag stretched over wooden ‘cushions’ with frames made from coat hanger wire.

Dash and steering wheel of the Toyota. The glovebox opens on tiny hinges.

Frontal view of the completed Toyota.

Nearside view of the completed vehicle. 

Left hand side of the completed vehicle showing the 4×4 stance. 

Rear view of the completed Toyota. A specialist made me the ‘Toyota’ badges, and he did a fine job. Even getting the slightly greenish -cream enamel infill colour exactly right. Thanks, Gary!

Toyota bonnet badge was filed from two pieces of real silver bought as scrap pieces from a jeweller. Strip along the bonnet centre line is also made from silver. 

The Land Cruiser’s engine bay with detailed engine and ancillary parts.

The bonnet displayed opened.

I made a working, fully functioning screw-pillar jack for the Toyota. the Frame is bent from thick nickel silver bars and the rest is built of adds and ends. The jack can actually be used to lift the model!  

Sarah checking the radiator.

Loading animal feed. Showing the working drop down tailgate.


Future articles by Robert will cover the following vehicles: Datsun Patrol L-60 1965; and the Land Rover Defender Heritage Edition 2016.


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OXFORD MILITARY – Churchill Tank Mk III

By Robin Godwin

All photographs by, and copyright of, the Author.

The box reads “… not a toy. Collectors model not suitable for children under 14 years.” There is always a point of discussion between collectors with the addition of “toylike” features added to collectors’ scale models. For regular vehicles, this discussion usually involves opening features such as doors, bonnets and boots. I don’t consider these features toylike or gimmicks at all. If they are there on the real vehicle, then why not on accurate scale models? The argument that opening features ruin the lines of a vehicle with poor fit and large gaps is, unfortunately, sometimes true, and those manufacturers who don’t put the extra engineering effort into proper design/fit and actuation deserve criticism in the model press. In fact, perfection has been achieved by several manufacturers in 1:43 and even 1:50 scales (and is routine in the larger scale models, except in some of the cheaper ranges like the new Solido 1:18 scale VW Beetle with dog-leg door hinges) so it can be done.

With armoured, tracked vehicles the discussion usually centres on the tracks, their accuracy and whether or not they roll. Again, I prefer working features, so I really like my tank models with rolling tracks. Virtually all the partwork 1:72 tanks and their derivative ranges feature fixed rolling wheels and tracks. They are marketed as collectors’ items as well, and generally feature very accurate running gear, which is fine for display models. The Oxford Diecast Churchill in 1:76 scale, with working tracks, leaves me a bit flat, however. It is the method of execution that has been under-engineered for what is described as a collectors’ model. The effect is uncannily similar to the solution sought by Dinky Toys and Matchbox over 60 years ago – obviously dummy cast wheels which hide a roller system behind, giving a remarkably toy like appearance rather than a seriously modelled effort. If this is meant to be a display model, it doesn’t display as well as it should. Forces of Valor (Unimax) produced a much more accurate working system on their 1:72 Churchill Mk VII tank several years ago. The pictures below illustrate the differences (in reality, the differences between a Mk III and a Mk VII largely amounted to additional armour, and up-gunning). Surprising as well is that OD omitted separate plastic antennas and features a fixed non-elevating fragile plastic barrel. Although the plastic turret rotates, these obvious omissions would have enhanced display value.

A complaint I have had before with OD products is quality control. Only one of my tracks rolls freely, with the other jammed a bit by a bent mounting bracket for the return roller/idler wheel. Since the base is screwed on, I may remove it and attempt to straighten the bent metal bracket, but this may chip the paint.

On average, though, the model is a decent replica of a Mk III tank that fought at el Alamein in North Africa in 1942. It features a satisfying amount of metal in it’s construction with a subsequent hefty feel. To me, it sits a bit high compared to more accurate 1:72 scale models, and finish appears to be way too glossy. Although OD calls it a collectors’ model, it is very toy like in execution. Unless you collect all versions of Churchills, or specific campaign versions, or are locked into 1:76 scale (and need a tank for your Oxford Diamond T Tank Transporter model, also used in the African Desert), then I recommend acquiring one of the 1:72 scale partworks. They are more accurate and generally less expensive.

Illustrations

Zylmex earlier generation Churchill Mk VII, left, Oxford Diecast Mk III, middle, Forces of Valor (FoV) Mk VII, right. Note non-elevating barrel on OD

The Zylmex is obviously a toy with the incorrect number of road wheels, but actually a simpler and (likely) less expensive production method (plastic one piece wheel/axle arrangement running through slots in the chassis). Zylmex at least added antennae, and opened up an access panel in the front of the track guards (likely for cleaning and/or repair access). The OD does the same panel in tampo black

The FoV is way more accurate, but spoiled by toy standard requirements for the metal wire antennae. It has what appears to be a better “posture” than the OD

Another Mk VII, this time from the Combat Tanks partworks by PCT/Ixo. Non-rolling wheels/tracks, but a way better looking model at half the price.

Matchbox Centurion, left, showing similar engineering solution to rolling wheels/tracks from over 50 years ago – solid cast “fake” road wheels with rolling mechanism hidden behind

The OD solution to rolling tracks. Not counting drive and idler wheels, there are 11 metal axles with plastic sleeve rollers per side. This can’t be the least expensive option for manufacturing, nor is it the best looking effect. Note bent idler wheel bracket on left side of photo, which means my model does not roll. A QC issue

The FoV solution to rolling wheels/tracks. Two plastic friction fit pieces per “axle” fit into holes in suspension casting. A better engineering solution, and a much better looking model


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A look at the Neo Ford Zodiac III Estate Car

By Maz Woolley

Photographs by the Author.

This Neo was released some time ago but it is still on general sale. It is made to 1:43 scale in resin in China for Germany. The Ford Zodiac Mark III was the top model in Ford’s line up from 1962 to 1966. With many mechanical similarities to the Mark II it somehow seemed like a larger car with a more dominating appearance. Its designer Roy Brown was also responsible for the Edsel and the Ford Cortina. The estate cars were a conversion by Abbots of Farnham who had had a profitable relationship with Ford which came to an end later in the 1960s when Ford decided Estate cars sold in sufficient volume to build them themselves. The Zodiac was powered by the familiar straight six engine of 2.6 Litres which had been fitted to the Mark II before it.

The Neo model captures the size and shape of the Zodiac Estate well. Its profile being very good. The photoetch looks good at first sight but is a bit too shiny and is not always shaped to give a flush fit in the channels it fits in.

The front end with its twin headlights and large grille are well captured and the Zodiac badging correctly printed in gold.

The wing mirrors are perhaps a little large with overscale shafts but this is presumably to stop them becoming so fragile that they would be easily damaged.

The estate car was quite a handsome conversion of the saloon with a  roomy interior and huge luggage space. Many of these estate cars were destined to become police vehicles as they could carry lots of emergency equipment and still have a reasonable turn of speed for Motorway Patrols.

The rear view show that Neo has made a nice job of the rear lights, handles and other rear details. The twin rear exhausts are present and are for once not chromed which is excellent as few would have been in the Sixties.

 

All in all this is a nice model from Neo and a top of the line Zodiac saloon would be a nice companion.


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Neo Daimler DB18 Barker Special Sports

By Maz Woolley

All photographs by the Author.

The DB18 chassis was introduced in 1939 and lasted until 1953. Its 2.5 Litre straight six engine was shared with the Daimler Scout car which was built in considerable numbers during the war. Almost all DB18s were built after 1945 as production was halted as war was declared. Fitted with the characteristic pre-selector gearbox and fluid flywheel the cars were capable of reaching about 80mph which was respectable at that time.

The chassis  carried everything from formal six light saloons to low and sleek convertibles. Most formal bodies were built by Hooper and dropheads by Barker. The Neo model is of a Barker Special Sports of which about 600 were built post war. It is made in resin to 1:43 scale in China for Germany.

As can be seen in the photograph above the Daimler grille and lights with the typical Lucas details have been beautifully modelled. The wing top side lights are also very finely made and have lenses and are not just painted in.

The wheels are also very nicely finished with the body coloured rims and chrome hub cap with central area for the “D” badge in black.

The model has captured the flowing lines of the bodywork well, and has not missed the slight “nick” in the front wing behind the front wheel which is a feature of this car. The rear spats are well represented too.

At the back, the badging and Daimler logo are well printed and the lights neat with separate lenses.

The interior is well presented though the wood grain does seem to be a little larger than life. The side facing seat in the rear, which could be removed to allow a bigger luggage capacity, is modelled well. The steering wheel and printed instruments on the dash are all very nicely done.

Again another good model from Neo to complement the Daimler Majestic Major, Conquest, and Sovereign already in their range.


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Atlas/Oxford Dennis F106 Fire Appliance

By Maz Woolley

All photographs by the Author.

Oxford Diecast has made several Fire Appliances to 1:76 scale. These are diecast in China in their own factory. Some of these models have been produced under contract for Atlas Editions and sold in their Fire Service Vehicles subscription series. It should be noted that even the models sold by Atlas have Oxford on their bases.

The Dennis F106, as modelled here, was made between 1963 and 1968. Ninety-nine vehicles were built. The version modelled is the rear pump variant with white tips to the roof ladders and an escape ladder that can be removed, though not extended, as shown below. The London Fire Brigade crest is printed  on the side lockers on both sides and a lot of detail has been printed on including climbing slots and the water hose attachment points.

The Oxford model is excellent and also appears in their own range with a different registration and without the bell on the cab roof.

The escape ladder fits neatly onthe vehicle by two pins inserted into slots in the roof.

The modelling includes printing on the visibility panel in the front cab doors. Although the flashing lights on the roof are painted the translucent blue over silver paint is very effective.

The wheels too are good moulded replicas of the full size ones with the silver hub caps on the front wheels well detailed.

The front of the vehicle has an excellent grille, well printed lights and a finely printed Dennis badge. Inside the cab a basic interior is provided and the chassis underneath is a flat largely detail-less plate.


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Togi History – Part II

by Koen Beekmann and Karl Schnelle

In Part I of this series, we looked at the founding of Togi and its first 2 cars.   #1 Cursor and #2 Turbo Special were introduced around 1958.  NOTE: Koen Beekmann took all the photos unless otherwise noted.  He also did all the research which we are compiling here.

Here is a little more information on the Turbo Special. They are still made today and accompanied by a drawing in the box.  The current castings are diecast using zamac alloy, but the original ones were  aluminum or some other light-weight alloy. Two versions of the drawings are shown below with the different front steering mechanism. The curved arms are the earlier design on the left are Photoshopped from the original on the right.   To determine if the original design could easily fit into the newer drawing, Koen tried it (and it does)!

And here is the mold for the Turbo Special; it looks like the earlier casting before the wrap-around windshield and is from the original owner, Mr Lorenzini.


The rest of Part II will concentrate on the next two models that came out.

After the first two cars, Togi moved on to reproducing actual automobiles.  All were Alfa Romeos in 1:23 scale (except for a Lancia).  Perhaps to keep the cars in the same size range as the first two, Mr. Lorenzini  chose the unusual scale of 1:23.  In the late 1950’s, there weren’t any 1:24 or 1:25 scale cars, so why not 1:23?

Thus, the third model was a 1:23 1959 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint. The development of this first Alfa model was delayed due to funding until 1959 or 60 and was finally on sale by 1962 (Rampini).  The earliest casting might not have Togi in the bottom and could in fact be a Trilor, Mr Lorenzini’s first company.  An Italian collector has one in his collection that he thinks is a Trilor (no name on the baseplate).   If this is the case, then Rampini could be mistaken and perhaps the first three cars were all made as Trilors first?   We may never know for sure…

Two generations of the #3 Giulietta Sprint are shown below.  The box calls it a Sprint Veloce (the higher horsepower version):

The first generation (in green on the left) has no interior, tight side windows, large wheels and metal headlights. The second generation (white) has interior, no side windows, silver lower side body trim, clear headlights, and smaller wheels with wheel nuts. Look and compare.  That beautiful box belongs to the old model.  Here is the green model again:

This first Alfa seems a little toy-like and rounder than it should be,  maybe that was the influence of their first two streamlined cars.  Here is a drawing included in the box of a later version:

The Giulietta Sprint was really not a very accurate model. Perhaps this was the best that Togi could do at the time.  The next Togi models will get better and better as they learned how to create more accurate model cars and still keep the toy characteristics (take-off wheels, suspension, and steering).  Togi was the abbreviation of Tonino GIocattoli  – Little Tony’s Toys –  after all!


According to Rampini, both the the 159 Formula One car and Giulietta SS  were introduced in 1962.  These two Alfa Romeos are beautiful model cars and a big improvement on the Sprint.  We will examine the 159 next.

The 159 ‘Alfetta’ raced in Formula One and a few other races during the 1951 season.  Coming out 11 years later did not matter, as this was an iconic race car.  However, Koen believes the #4 Togi 159 was developed earlier than 1962, sometime in 1959 or early 1960.  After the Corsar, the Turbo Special and the Giulietta Sprint, this was the fourth model from the Milanese manufacturer.

Simple spoke wheels were developed for this model, which were then carried over to the first two Togi’s.  Furthermore, it is still evident that it is just an old-style toy car: the design has been carried out very broadly, with some remarkable details such as operating steering wheel that moves the front wheels and working wing nuts on the wheels. The Togi, like the real 159, was only made in red, although the color differed over the years. The three 159’s below each have a different red color (and different wheels).

Like the other Togis, this Alfa was also available as a kit: nice for a model from the early 1960s but very simple as a kit!  What’s more fun than having a copy of the famous Fangio’s race car with racing numbers?  However, this model used fantasy race numbers, placed in the correct location on the body. The oldest versions are shown below:

The old 159 has never disappeared from the Togi range and is still being produced. Somewhere in the early 1970’s, the model was fitted with new open spoke wheels. These chrome wheels were still very simple and similar to the spoke wheels on Dinky’s at that time. In fact, the much nicer Revival race cars, from back then, still do not command the high prices that these Togi’s do now.  Here are closeups of the two older ones:

Apparently, Togi looked to see what low-cost improvements could be made to the 159.  A new perforated protective plate was added to the side exhaust pipes, but the metal exhaust was no longer chromed. The new spoke wheels were changed to black as well.  A unusual choice because the wheels of the real 159 were always silver.   Here is the newer version, bought in 1995 (photo by Karl):

Also, here is the original mold for the 159 from Mr Lorenzini; no reason for Togi to update that!

In 2011 or just before that, Togi announced a chrome 159, actually a nickel-plated model.    The prototype is shown below.

Several years later, it came to production and is listed on their website currently.  Three versions are shown: gold, ‘black’ nickel, and ‘white’ nickel.  This is a photo from Togi before it was released:

Many of the later Togi came with a plastic display case inside the outer box.  Similar to the Turbo Special,  a nice drawing was also included in the box, in case an enterprising kid wanted to take apart the 159 and hopefully put it back together:

Koen did an internet search and found at least five box types (not in any particular order):

  • nice red drawing of the 159 (original silver wheels)
  • color stripes on cardboard box (black wheel version)
  • yellow box with small window on the edge (silver or black wheels)
  • Styrofoam box with red/yellow sticker, inside is a clear plastic display box with brown base (black wheels)
  • Togi in white letters inside a red stripe on a sticker on a thin cardboard box (silver or black wheel versions)

Next time in Part III, we will continue the Togi story with the Giulietta SS.


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CMC Morris LD Van

By Maz Woolley

CMC plastic 1:76 model kits were only on the market for a relatively short time and were not widely seen even when in production. I have had their Morris J Van which I bought when the range was first sold which was an excellent model which made up reasonably easily for a multi-part kit.

I know that they also made a Morris LD and a Bedford CA and have kept my eyes open for them at toyfairs but have never seen any made or unmade until recently when I came across the LD. This was a bought from a toyfair made up and painted very poorly. I have taken it apart and over-sprayed it as I did not dare use paint stripper of any kind in case it attacked the plastic.

Like the Morris J, the CMC model is a fair representation of the real van though the paint coats needed to hide the original paintwork have rather smoothed out the sharper features.

All in all quite a nice model and unlike the Corgi Trackside to the correct 1:76 scale.

I shall keep looking for the Bedford CA and a better LD but it is a nice addition to my small scale range of commercials.


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Polish Ice Cream Truck, a 1:43 Conversion

By John-William Greenbaum

Here’s a decidedly post-communist truck converted from a communist-era design: the ZUK A-11B Pickup Truck (a 1/43 Polish partworks truck made by Ixo), as converted into an ice cream truck for Lodmor, a manufacturer of ice cream, sorbet, and yogurt in Gdansk!  This model truck was for sale in Poland and converted by some unknown person.

The Plasticville figure was actually part of the conversion in the rear suite, but came loose in transit. I’ve since reattached her using that guaranteed-to-work method: double-sided tape!

The ZUK A-11B was a pretty popular pickup truck in Poland more or less throughout the seventies and eighties, actually surviving communism to be manufactured in the nineties, albeit not in huge numbers. However, so many were in service and parts were so inexpensive that you could indeed convert these trucks into commercial vehicles like rent-a-trucks or indeed ice cream trucks that generally speaking weren’t crucial to Polish infrastructure.

Given the amount of French and German ice cream trucks made in a similar manner that are still on the streets manufactured in the seventies and eighties, I’d honestly not be surprised if one could walk around Gdansk and find one of these driving around.  In fact I found photos of one in-service and one not.

Remarks on the Real Truck

The last of the FSC ZUK pickup trucks, the ZUK A-11B, was probably the most successful of any of them. Based externally on the 1966-vintage ZUK A-14 Export Fire Truck that essentially inspired all post-1966 ZUK vehicles, it could best be seen as the successor to the ZUK A-03 pickup, which was the very first of FSC ZUK’s pickup trucks. As with the boxy A-03 it was meant to replace, the original ZUK A-11, which was introduced in 1968, made extensive use of corrugated steel in the construction of the cab. The most noticeable improvement was a hood that flipped up easily.

Although somewhat problematic due to an incredibly high center of gravity that saw the pickups often literally tip over onto their sides, it was all in all an improvement over the ZUK A-03 in the reliability department. Although handling could best be described as awful, the ZUK A-11 did at the very least receive a responsive steering wheel so as to try and prevent as many trucks from tipping onto their sides as possible. It did, however, have two glaring problems. First among these was that the engine design was still the old GAZ-M20 Pobeda engine. Worse, however, was that the truck used a wooden cargo bed that often dry-rotted and had all kinds of problems with cracking and damage.

In 1973, the vehicle received a new, more powerful engine, being renamed the ZUK A-11M. However, the problem with the wooden cargo bed proved rather serious. In 1975, the ZUK A-11M was withdrawn from production in favor of the ZUK A-11B that you see featured here.  In 1998, the ZUK A-11B had the honor of being the very last truck to roll off FSC ZUK’s assembly line before then factory  was closed for good. Many stayed in service for years afterward in all kinds of jobs.

Fir this example, the cargo bed has been removed and replaced by a nineties-era ice cream truck suite! Lodmor is still a manufacturer of ice cream in Gdansk, and that’s the corporate sponsor that this particular A-11B ice cream truck has. Note the folding side window and refrigeration unit as well, which are probably licensed copies of features found on German or French ice cream trucks. A truck like this probably would have remained in service well into the twenty-first century, as there was absolutely no need to replace it with something technologically superior. Heck, I’m willing to bet there are is more than one of these still driving around, given the presence of Renaults from the sixties in France, old Mercedes-Benz O-series trucks in Germany, old Leylands driving around Britain, and seventies Dodge trucks driving around here in the US.

Given how successful  a late 1960’s design was doing in the 1990’s, one is forced to wonder just how well it could have done had FSC ZUK’s  communist bureaucrats not nearly destroyed the design during the 1980’s (updated the flaws with the wooden cargo bed, etc).

ZUK A-11B Lodmor Ice Cream Truck Conversion 
Poland, 1:43 Model by Ixo, modified by unknown
Figure by Plasticville, painted and modified
Years Built: 1975-1998
Engine: 70 HP 4-cylinder four-stroke
Fuel Type: Gasoline
Top Speed: 63 mph

More details about the real 1:1 scale ZUK  A-11B can be seen on the author’s Facebook page.


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Siku Claas Xerion with Slurry Tanker

By Maz Woolley

Photographs by the Author.

Most UK collectors will be familiar with the Siku displays that can be found in toy shops and garden centres around the land. These displays usually consist of the models that are sold in their fit in the box Super range. From cars to tractors, airplanes and motorbikes in a variety of scales.

To accompany that they have some more specialist ranges, in particular the Siku Farmer range which has 1:32 and 1:87 series. Siku is part of the Sieper Group, which also owns Wiking, and its Siku branded models are diecast in China.

This post looks at one of the current Siku Farmer 1:87 range which are nicely made though to a slightly lower level of detail than Wiking Plastic models. The cabs of the 1:87 tractors can be lifted off and could have drivers fitted if ones to fit could be found.

1827 Claas Xerion with Slurry Tanker

The Claas Xerion tractor is a large and impressive one. Powered by a Mercedes-Benz engine with large wheels front and back it is at the top of the Claas range of tractors.

The slurry it tows is fitted with tubes to connect it to the slurry tanks and the huge spray arms that fold out either side.

The arms are excellent and include a lot of moulded detail and even tubing to connect the spraying arms to the tanker.

Although 1:87 scale the model is large and very impressive especially for a budget range.


I hope to cover some more models from this range in the future as they portray the modern agricultural scene very well and are much easier to store and display than the more common 1:32 scale Agricultural models.


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Intergranular Corrosion

By Maz Woolley

Photographs by the Author of a model in Dave Turner’s collection of Fords in MIniature.

Integranular corrosion is better known to collectors as “metal fatigue” or “zinc pest”. The alloys used for diecast models (Mazak/Zamak) should be stable and models should remain fine for years unless impurities exist in the alloys. Many of us became aware of this phenomenon when collectors of early Dinky models watched their models disintegrating before their eyes. Since when the same has been seen in other ranges with pictures of broken and fatigued Saratov produced USSR models featuring on some bulletin boards for example.

Many collectors, including me, had believed that modern mainstream die casters quality control was a guarantee that such problems would not arise. But it isn’t true. The pictures below are of a Corgi model which is gradually failing but Corgi are not the only people whose models have issues, and the failure of the model below should not be taken as an indication that your stored Corgi models are any more at risk than other makes.

The Millionth Transit was a popular release from Corgi but as can be seen from the photographs below this one it is suffering so badly from the corrosion that the sides are bowing out and the bonnet and roof are wrinkled.

Things are a little complicated by the fact that it appears that poor preparation or paint issues by some makers may cause the paint to lift and craze whilst the casting below is still actually in good condition. However, as the pictures above show when the metal starts to fail the surfaces become “wavy” which means that it is not just a problem with paint.

Many collectors, myself included, have models stored in boxes. It may be worth your while looking over models that you have not looked at in a while to check that they are all OK. If you should find models with Intergranular corrosion please let us know by email or facebook or via the contact form on the website. It would be interesting to see pictures and perhaps do a round up of the wider experience of collectors at a later date.


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